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School Improvement Planning Opening Doors To Improved Student Achievement

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Title: School Improvement Planning Opening Doors To Improved Student Achievement


1
School Improvement PlanningOpening Doors To
Improved Student Achievement

Fully Accredited and Met AYP
Virginia Department of Education ? Office of
School Improvement April 5 and 24, 2006
2
Todays Workshop Objectives
  • To examine critical components of school
    improvement planning through the use of a
    comprehensive needs assessment
  • To reinforce a review of academic data as the
    most critical component of the needs assessment
  • To review additional components of the needs
    assessment

3
Todays Workshop Objectives
  • To offer this presentation as a school
    improvement planning tool to assist principals,
    lead teachers, and school support team members
    begin, continue or improve the whole-school
    reform effort.

4
  • The School Improvement Effort Begins with
  • COURAGE.

5
Is It Best To Leave Some DoorsUnopened?
Welcome
6
Opened Doors Reveal
  • Juggling Priorities
  • Todays schools juggle many different
    prioritiesto ensure
  • that they improve the education of the children.
  • They aim to improve the literacy and numeracy of
    their
  • student populations, raise standards of
    achievement in general,
  • maximize the learning opportunities for pupils
    with special
  • needs, improve on poor attendance, share good
    teaching
  • practices with staff and perfect performance
    monitoring.
  • When laid out in a list like this, it can seem
  • that the role of most school managers is
  • something akin to a highly skilled
  • juggling act.

  • Phil Neal, Capita Education Services

7
Opened Doors Reveal
  • The Quality of Teaching
  • Effective teachers employ effective instructional
    strategies,
  • classroom management techniques, and classroom
  • curricular design in a fluent, seamless fashion.
  • Leinhardt and Greens Brooks and Hawke
  • The most important factor affecting
  • student learning is the teacher.
  • Robert J. Marzano

8
Opened Doors Reveal
  • The Degree of Central Office
  • Support
  • Effective school improvement involves building
  • the capacity for change and development. This
  • necessitates pressure and support from both
  • external and internal sources.
  • The need for 'change agentry' is well established
  • in the literature however, relatively little has
    been written
  • about the role of the LEA as an external agent of
    change.
  • School Leadership Management, Taylor Francis
    Group

9
Opened Doors Reveal
  • The Order of
  • Priorities
  • "The old way of thinking was that parental
    involvement was all about parents. The new way is
    that it's about student success."
  • Dr. Joyce Epstein, Center on School, Family and
    Community Partnerships

Is Increased Parental Involvement a Top Priority
in Our School?
10
Opened Doors Reveal
  • Fundamental
  • Student Beliefs
  • What matters most is that students
  • come to believe deeply in their own
  • capacity to master difficult academic
  • material through sustained,
  • thoughtful effortThe behaviors
  • cease to identify
  • watershedsbecause no student is set
  • apart from others.
  • Every student is completing
  • homework, volunteering in class
  • Changing the Culture, D. Bruce Jackson

11
Open Doors Should Reveal the Fulfillment of
  • The Vision
  • Schools should be places that challenge students
  • academically, support
  • teachers instructionally,
  • and encourage
  • principled leadership
  • at all levels.
  • Tim Knowles, Executive Director of the Center for
    Urban School Improvement, Chicagolt Illinois

12
It Can Be Done.
  • Research Shows
  • "Any school in the United States can operate at
  • advanced levels of effectiveness--if it is
    willing to
  • implement what is known about effective
    schooling.
  • If we follow the guidance offered from 35 years
    of
  • research, we can enter an era of unprecedented
  • effectiveness for the public practice of
    education."
  • Robert J. Marzano

13
Doors Swing Both Ways.
  • The Good
  • The Bad
  • The Ugly

Whats Really Behind Your School Doors?
Are You Brave Enough?
14
Behind Those Doors
  • The Good
  • Changing Behaviors
  • Assessing Students
  • Parent Conferencing
  • Articulation Among/Across Grade Levels
  • Thinking Big
  • On-going Development of Integrated, Sequential
    Curriculum
  • Team Building
  • Sharing Ideas, Materials, Resources
  • Creating a Supportive Risk- Taking, No-Fault
    Environment
  • The Bad and The Ugly
  • Inadequate Planning Time
  • Lack of Adequate Funding
  • Few Materials / Resources
  • Traditional Assessments
  • Lack of Parental Involvement
  • Community Apathy
  • Student Apathy and Poor Behavior
  • Fear of Job Security
  • Constant Change in Administrative Policy
  • Inadequate Teacher Compensation
  • Inconsistent Professional Development

15
Workshop Time
15 minutes
Choose a recorder and a reporter for each
workshop activity.
  • In your school teams, decide what are the top
    three Goods and the top three Bads and Uglies
    in your school.
  • Discuss the impact each of the six factors has on
    your school.
  • Prioritize the three positive factors and the
    three negative factors.

16
Organizing Todays Thoughts
GO1
  • Mount the Courage to Look At the Entire Schools
    Strengths and Weaknessesthe Good, the Bad, and
    the Ugly.
  • Examples of What School Teams Will See
  • Juggling Administrative Priorities
  • The Quality of Teaching
  • The Degree of Central Office Support
  • The Order of Priorities
  • Fundamental Student Beliefs
  • Attained or Unattained Division and School Vision

17
Why Are the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly All Good?
  • For the lowest achieving students in the highest
    poverty schools to meet high standards of
    performance, the entire instructional program
    must be substantially
  • improved and every facet of the school must
    be examined.
  • Administration, staff, parents, and community
    must assess the good, the bad, and the ugly (of
    the whole school) before there can be change.
  • No Child Left Behind Act of 2001
  • Comprehensive School Reform


18
Schools Must Conduct a Comprehensive
Needs Assessment.
19
Research-based FundamentalsExamining the School
Teams Primary Tasks
  • Where are we now?
  • Where do we want to go?
  • How will we get there?
  • How will we know when we get there?
  • How will we sustain the focus and the momentum?
  • Asking the Right Questions Techniques for
    Collaboration and School Change
  • Edie Holcomb

20
Conducting An Effective
Needs Assessment
  • How Do We Get There
  • From Here?

21
By Examining Data Obstacles or Passports
to Improved Student Performance?Academic Data
Sources
  • Achievement Tests Scores
  • Criterion-Referenced Tests
  • Norm-Referenced Tests
  • Diagnostic Tests
  • Benchmark Tests
  • Competency Tests
  • End-of-Chapter Tests
  • Other Performance Indicator Tools
  • Progress through Levels of Instruction
  • Teacher Grades (Report Card)
  • Grade-point Averages
  • Progress Checklists and Logs
  • Workbook Completions
  • Student Assignment Sheets

22
Even More Data School/Student Status Indicators
  • Percentages of
  • Students--
  • On Honor Roll
  • Taking AP Courses
  • College Bound
  • Attending College Each Year
  • On, Below, Above Grade Level
  • Involved in Extra-Curricular Activities
  • Percentages of
  • Students--
  • Continuing in, Formerly in, or New Identification
    for Special Programs
  • Retained
  • Dropping Out
  • Attending at or Near 100 percent and lower
  • Tardy Each Day
  • Referred, Suspended, Homebound, Expelled

23
(Non-Academic)More Needs Assessment Data
  • Instructional Support Programs
  • Guidance/ School Health
  • Gifted and Talented
  • Title I /Other Federal Programs
  • Parent Resource Center
  • Instructional Materials
  • Technology
  • Before/After School Programs
  • Staff
  • Staff Credentials
  • Staff Attendance
  • Staff Morale
  • Use of Instructional Time
  • Teacher After-school Involvement with Students
  • Professional Development

24
...and More Data Possibilities
  • In-School
  • School Climate
  • Parent / Teacher / Adm. Relationships
  • Teacher Satisfaction
  • Building / Equipment
  • Communication
  • Accessibility to Adm.
  • Student Nutrition Program
  • Transportation
  • Community Relations
  • Confidence in School
  • Commitment to School
  • Volunteerism
  • Donations
  • Open Door Policy
  • Mentorships
  • Quality of Public Relations

25
Learning About Students from Parents and Teacher
Conferences
  • Parental Input
  • Parent-noted Strengths/Deficiencies
  • Noted Adjustment Problems
  • Physical Handicaps or Health Problems
  • Degree of Commitment to Education in Home
  • Parent Requests for Certain Teachers
  • Student Comfort in Classroom
  • Peer Influence
  • Student Appreciation of Academics
  • Student Respect for Teachers and Administration
  • Student Response to Rewards and Consequences

26
This Is An Opportunity. This is Too
Much Data.
Its Unavoidable. Start WithEnd WithData
27
Organizing Todays Thoughts
GO2
  • Conduct a Comprehensive Needs Assessment, and
    Consider Areas Beyond Academic Data.
  • A. Academic Performance
  • B. Administration/Staff
  • C. Socio-economic School Status
  • D. Instructional Program
  • E. Parent and Community Involvement
  • F. Technology and School Facilities
  • G. School Culture and School Climate
  • H. Use of Fiscal Resources

28
What Do You Need to Know About Your School?
  • SCHOOLS
  • MUST
  • ORGANIZE DATA.

Presenter Ann Sheehan, Title I
Specialist Office of Program Administration and
Accountability Virginia Department of Education
29
But First What Is A Needs Assessment?
  • A comprehensive needs assessment is a
    systematic effort to acquire an accurate and
    thorough picture of strengths and weaknesses of a
    school
  • community, thus,
  • identifying the needs
  • of the students of your
  • school.

30
What Are the Basic Steps to Organizing a
Comprehensive Needs Assessment?1.Select Areas
To Be Assessed
  • Examples of Universally Accepted Needs Assessment
    Areas
  • A. Academic Performance
  • B. Administration/Staff
  • C. Socio-economic School Status
  • D. Instructional Program
  • E. Parent and Community Involvement
  • F. Technology and School Facilities
  • G. School Culture and School Climate
  • H. Use of Fiscal Resources

31
 
Is There a Match Between the Examples of
Universally Accepted Needs Assessment Areas and
the SOA and NCLB School Improvement Plan
Requirements?
Examples of Universally Accepted Needs Assessment
Areas A. Academic Performance
(SOA 2 / NCLB v) B. Administration/Staff
(SOA 6 / NCLB iii,
x) C. Socio-economic School Status D.
Instructional Program
(SOA 1, 3, 4, 5 / NCLB i, ii, ix) E. Parent and
Community Involvement (SOA 7 / NCLB viii,
vi) F. Technology and School Facilities G.
School Culture and School Climate H. Use of
Fiscal Resources (SOA 8, 9 / NCLB vii, iv)

 
 
32
Whats Next?
  • 2. Decide what data are
  • needed.
  • Under each agreed upon /selected area from the
    comprehensive listing of types of possible data,
    decide what data are needed to generate an
    in-depth picture of your school.
  • Develop a
  • Work Plan for the
  • Comprehensive
  • Needs Assessment for
  • Your School.

33
Step Three
  • 3. Select Methods to Collect Data.
  • Divide Faculty and Staff into Committees to
    Review
  • Online AYP and SOL Report Cards
  • School SOL Reports
  • Student Performance-by-Question
  • SOL Strand Data
  • Guidance Department Reports
  • Existing School Improvement Plans
  • Interview
  • Key Informant Interviews
  • Devise
  • Surveys
  • Organize
  • Forums

34
Steps Four and Five
  • 4. Record, Analyze, and Report
  • Data.
  • Establish Procedures
  • Reporting Formats (charts, graphs)
  • Prioritize Findings
  • Report to the Entire School Community
  • 5. Use the Needs Assessment for
  • Program Planning.

35
Final Step
  • 6. Plan for continual
  • review.
  • Updating of data and revision of the school
    improvement plan must be a part of the design.

36
Easier Said Than Done
  • The Needs Assessment
  • A High-Stakes Task
  • To understand the importance of undertaking the
    steps, we have to understand the critical nature
    of the Purpose
  • of the Needs Assessment.

37
PurposeThe needs assessment provides schools
and school divisions with a well-developed
database for making decisions.
38
The Goal of the Needs Assessment To Answer
Such Questions As
  • WHICH
  • Which Grades?
  • Which Classes?
  • Which Gender...?
  • Which SWDs...?
  • Which LEPs...?
  • Which Schools...?
  • Which Teachers...?
  • Which Resources?
  • WHAT
  • What Quartile...?
  • What Number...?
  • What Level...?
  • What Percentage...?
  • What Changes...?
  • What Differences...?
  • What Similarities...?
  • What Patterns...?

39
Comprehensive Needs Assessment Improved
Definition
  • A comprehensive needs assessment is a
    systematic, on-going, dynamic process that seeks
    input and data from many sources to make
    decisions regarding program focus, special
    educational need, student selection, and service
    delivery models.

40
Organizing Todays Thoughts
GO3
  • Conduct a Comprehensive Needs Assessment Using
    the Seven Steps.
  • Focus on the Purpose of the Needs Assessment--to
    provide schools and school divisions with a
    well-developed database for making decisions.
  • Include Areas Other Than Academic Performance in
    the Needs Assessment. (Note there is an
    alignment between the universally accepted areas
    and the SOA and NCLB School Improvement Plan
    requirements.)

41
Example A Closer Look or Brief ReviewSchools
Number One Priority Assessment of
Academic Performance
42

Unavoidable Data Source
  • Achievement Tests Scores
  • Criterion-referenced Tests
  • Standards of Learning
  • AYP Calculation
  • Accreditation Calculation
  • Norm-referenced Tests
  • Diagnostic Tests
  • Benchmark Tests
  • Competency Tests
  • End-of-Chapter Tests

Unavoidable Questions
43
Each Schools Response Should Guide Its School
Improvement Planning.
  • Unavoidable Questions
  • Which targets were met in your school?
  • Which ones were not?
  • Which subgroup(s) performed best?
  • Which subgroup(s) underperformed?
  • By how many points were targets
  • missed or exceeded?

Unavoidable Process
44
DD
DD
DD
DATA
DD
DD
DD
DD
DD
DD
DD
DD
DD
DD
DD
DD
DD
DD
DD
DD
DD
DD
DD
45
Definition of Data Disaggregation
  • Definition
  • Data disaggregation involves looking at data
  • by student subgroups / sub-categories to see
  • if there are important differences in the
  • performance of the subgroups / sub-categories
  • which are not seen when looking at the data as
  • a whole.

46
Purposes of Data Disaggregation
  • To monitor academic equity goals regarding race,
    gender, ethnic groups, socio-economic status,
    disabilities
  • To identify areas for further study (assessing)
    such as additional mathematic assistance versus
    reading or the value of increasing the reading
    block from 60 to 90 minutes
  • To laser focus on pockets of improvement to
    generate whole-school improvement
  • To provide a method to present the school to
    colleagues and to the community
  • To define a way to make continuous improvement a
    baseline for incremental improvement instead of
    dramatic change

47
Workshop Time
15minutes
Choose a recorder and a reporter for each
workshop activity.
  • Using the Academic Performance area of
    assessment, list 10 questions your school would
    like answered through the comprehensive needs
    assessment process. Use the previous slide for
    hints.
  • Then indicate a specific data source and process
    that could be used to gather the information to
    answer each question.
  • A. Academic Performance
  • Example
  • What is the AYP performance of Hispanic students
    in grades 3 and 5?
  • Data Source Disaggregated AYP test data from
    central office DDOT. Process Review and analysis
    of actual data.
  • B. Administration/Staff
  • C. Socio-economic School Status
  • D. Instructional Program
  • E. Parent and Community Involvement
  • F. Technology and School Facilities
  • G. School Climate
  • H. Use of Fiscal Resources

48
Organizing Todays Thoughts
GO4
  • Needs Assessments Will Always Include an In-depth
    Look at Academic Data.
  • Academic Data Must Be Disaggregated In Order to
    Answer Specific Questions About Student/Subgroup
    Performance.

49
Most Critical Disaggregation QuestionsHow
Are Subgroups Performing in Your School?How Will
Subgroups Perform in Your School? ? ? ? ? What
Are the School Improvement Plans Based on this
Performance? Are School Improvement Plans Based
Only on Current Performance or Current Benchmarks?
50
Fact or Fiction?
  • This current years instructional program in your
    school was likely based on an analysis of school
    year 2004-2005 (last years) student academic
    data.
  • and
  • The next set of revisions to your plan will
    likely be based on school year 2005-2006 (this
    years) results.
  • so
  • Its important to think about one years set of
    benchmarks / targets / annual measurable
    objectives at a time.

51
This Years Reminder There are 29 Targets for
Virginia Schools to Meet Based on Standards of
Learning Performance, Participation, and the
Other Academic Indicator. OAI
Elementary/Middle Attendance 94 or Science
70 OAI High Graduation rate 57
Performance by School and Subgroups
Total School
Black
White
Hispanic
Economically disadvantaged
Limited English Proficiency
Students with disabilities
52
School Year 2006-2007 Reminder There are 29
Targets for Virginia Schools to Meet Based on
Standards of Learning Performance, Participation,
and the Other Academic Indicator. OAI
Elementary/Middle Attendance 94 or Science
70 OAI High Graduation rate 57
Performance by School and Subgroups
Total School
Black
White
Hispanic
Economically disadvantaged
Limited English Proficiency
Students with disabilities
53
Another ReminderSchool Improvement Planning
Ahead
  • School Improvement Plans Under the SOA Are
    Three-Year Plans.
  • School Improvement Plans Under NCLB Are Two-Year
    Plans.
  • Student Achievement Activities, Goals,
    Benchmarks, etc. must be based on the targets
    (annual measurable objectives-AMOs) that
    continually increase.

SUBGROUPS
54
Reminder School Improvement Plans Are
Three-Year Plans The Benchmarks or Targets
Increase


By 2013-2014, all students will reach high
standards, at a minimum, attaining proficiency or
better in reading and mathematics.
55
Workshop Time
15 minutes
Choose a recorder and a reporter for each
workshop activity.
  • In preparation for the receipt of this years AYP
    report, take out your schools current AYP report
    and highlight the underperforming subgroups by
    subject (English 65 / Mathematics 63).
  • Indicate also if participation (95) and/or the
    other academic indicator were issues of concern
    (attendance 94, science 70 or progress,
    graduation rate 57).
  • Be able to share during report out several
    strategies included in your school improvement
    plan that were designed to increase student
    performance in the particular area(s).
  • Write a corresponding strategy that should
    contribute to the sustaining of the anticipated
    improvement in order to reach the next set of
    benchmarks.

56
Organizing Todays Thoughts
GO5
  • Keep Your Eye on the Benchmarks / Targets /
    Annual Measurable Objectives Now Through 2014.
  • Re-evaluate and Revise the Three/Two-Year School
    Improvement Plan Accordingly.

57
  • Presenting
  • Data
  • Presenter
  • Dr. Shelly Bazemore,
    Specialist
  • Office of School
    Improvement
  • Virginia Department
    of Education

58
Ways to Organize and Review Data
Disaggregated AYP Performance Analysis of Grade 3
AYP Performance Over Time
Insert Current Targets
2002-2003
2005-2006
2004-2005
2003-2004
Reading Mathematics
Science Social Studies
59
Ways to Organize and Review Data
Classroom/Teacher Performance Analysis of
Performance Above the 50th Percentile
Classroom A
Classroom D
Classroom C
Classroom B
60
Great County Public SchoolsSOL Assessment Pass
Rates
61

Great County Public SchoolsSOL Assessment Pass
Rates
62
(No Transcript)
63
(No Transcript)
64
(No Transcript)
65
(No Transcript)
66
DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA
DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA
DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA
DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA DATA
Does It End Here?
67
  • Beyond the Initial Needs
  • Assessment
  • Assessing As An Ongoing
  • Process
    Presenter
  • Kathleen Smith,
    Director
  • Office of School
    Improvement
  • Virginia Department
    of Education

68
Beyond the Initial Needs Assessment Assessing
As An Ongoing ProcessA Closer Look at Step 6
  • STEP 6
  • Plan for Continual Review.
  • Updating of data and revision of the school
    improvement plan must be a part of the design.
  • New data must be collected and reviewed on an
    ongoing basis.

69
Formative Assessment
  • Checkpoints prior to summative assessment (which
    comes at the end of the teaching/learning process
    and gives a summary of how well lessons were
    taught)
  • Ensures a match between written and taught
    curriculum
  • Purpose is to adjust teacher/student behavior
    based on student performance
  • Guides Adjustments
  • Re-teaching, enriching, pacing, grouping,
    individualizing
  • Re-thinking daily schedules, use of specialists,
    materials, length of day (or school year).
  • Redesigning role of principal as instructional
    leader, professional development, role of parents
  • Reallocation of resources

70
Some Lessons from Formative Assessments
  • Too Many Curricula
  • Written curriculum
  • Taught curriculum varies by classroom
  • Tested curriculum classroom, division, and state
  • levels
  • The three must be aligned.
  • Teachers are the critical factor.

71
Is it Important to Conduct Formative
Assessments? More Lessons from Formative
Assessments
  • Misalignment of Grade-by-Grade Instructional
  • Goals and Instructional Objectives or
    Competencies
  • Embedded in the Standards of Learning
  • One Strategy to Remedy
  • Unpack the competencies or instructional
    objectives embedded in the Standards of Learning.
  • Align the competencies with the schools reading
  • program.
  • Utilize grade level teacher teams to align the
  • reading program to the SOL objectives.

72
Another Lesson from Formative Assessments
(continued)
  • Need for more frequent checks (mini
  • assessments) for each smaller part of the
  • larger instructional task.
  • One Strategy to Remedy
  • Develop teaching (staged or leveled) activities
    for each task.
  • Develop an assessment for each stage or level of
    the task as part of the teaching activity
  • Develop a tracking process for each student
  • that indicates how the student is
    progressing.

73
Formative Assessments Can Help Answer These
Familiar Questions Before the End of the School
Year.
  • Which Grades...?
  • Which Classes...?
  • Which Programs...?
  • Which Teachers...?
  • Which Students...?
  • Which Gender...?
  • Which Skills...?
  • More Questions
  • Which SES Providers?
  • Which Volunteer Tutors?
  • Which Teaching Strategies?
  • What Supplemental Materials...?
  • Which Supplemental Mathematics Program...?
  • Which Title I Reading Program
  • What Patterns...?
  • What Additions...?
  • What Deletions...?

74
Organizing Todays Thoughts
GO6
  • Collection and Analysis of Data Are Ongoing.
  • Formative Assessments Are a Necessary Part of the
    Ongoing Needs Assessment.
  • Continual Benchmarking is An Important Key to
    Changing Instruction to Meet Instructional Needs.

75
  • Taking A Look at Other Major
  • Needs Assessment
  • Categories
  • Presenter
  • Catherine (Katie) Rosenbaum, Specialist
  • Office of School Improvement
  • Virginia Department of Education

76
The Other Categories for Which We Must Formulate
Questions
  • Academic Performance
  • Administration and Staff
  • School Status
  • Instructional Program
  • Parent and Community Involvement
  • Technology and School Facilities
  • School Culture and Climate
  • Use of Fiscal Resources

77
Why Would These Questions Be Asked?
  • Administration and Staff
  • Is the school-level professional development tied
    to the school improvement plan?
  • School Status
  • Do students on free or reduced lunch have a
    higher homework incompletion rate than students
    not on free or reduced lunch?
  • Instructional Program
  • What percentage of the schools student
    population is limited English proficient,
    migrant, speech/language impaired, and what
    programs are provided for each?

78
Examples of Questions Under Designated Needs
Assessment Categories
  • Parent and Community Involvement
  • Are we providing important documents to parents
    in languages other than English, as needed?
  • Technology and School Facilities
  • Are teachers incorporating computer-assisted
    learning into their daily lessons? Is the
    hardware/software up-to-date?
  • School Culture and Climate
  • Do teachers demonstrate a belief that all
    children can learn?
  • Use of Fiscal Resources
  • Are Title I funds being used in the most
    effective manner?

79
Workshop Time
15 minutes
  • Taking A Look at Other Major Needs
  • Assessment Categories
  • A. Academic Performance
  • B. Administration/Staff
  • C. Socio-Economic School Status
  • D. Instructional Program
  • E. Parent and Community Involvement
  • F. Technology and School Facilities
  • G. School Culture and School Climate
  • H. Use of Fiscal Resources
  • Develop at least two questions in each category
    that you would like answered about your school
    and that you anticipate including in your ongoing
    needs assessment.

Choose a recorder and a reporter for each
workshop activity.
80
Organizing Todays Thoughts
GO7
  • Conduct a Comprehensive Needs Assessment Using
    the Seven Steps.
  • Focus on the Purpose of the Needs Assessment--to
    provide schools and school divisions with a
    well-developed database for making decisions.
  • Include Areas Other Than Academic Performance in
    the Needs Assessment. (Note there is an
    alignment between the universally accepted areas
    and the SOA and NCLB School Improvement Plan
    requirements.)

81
School Improvement Planning
  • Hard
  • Work


82
What are the constant think abouts in order
to breakthrough to effective school
improvementplanning?
School Improvement Planning
A
83
Effective School Improvement Planning
IncludesCollaboration.
Come together to eliminate the isolation that
characterizes working conditions for so many
educators
84
Effective School Improvement Planning
IncludesIntegration of Services.
  • Address the needs of
  • students in an integrated way.
  • Bring school and district
  • personnel together, especially
  • those that administer
  • programs that directly
  • impact students.

85
Translation
  • Build on innovative,
  • integrated, whole-school
  • teaching and learning
  • strategies that are
  • research-based rather
  • than creating numerous
  • and separate add-on
  • services. (Ensure that no group of
    students feels fenced out.)
  • Assess the effectiveness of each
  • existing add-on program.
  • Eliminate those that are not
  • generating improved student
  • achievement.

86
Effective School Improvement Planning
IncludesCoordination and Reallocation of
Resources.
  • Other Smaller Funding Sources
  • Community/Business /Civic Project Funds
  • Greek Organizations
  • Newspapers In Education Mini Grants
  • Other Community Scholarships
  • Division Incentive Grants
  • Principals In-School Budget
  • Cultural Establishments
  • Major Funding Sources
  • Title I A- Basic Programs
  • Title II A-Professional Development
  • Title IID- Technology
  • Title III-LEP
  • Title IV-Safe/Drug-Free Schools and 21st Century
    Learning Communities
  • Title V- Innovative Programs
  • Title VI- Rural and Low Income Programs
  • Homework Assistance Programs

87
Effective School Improvement Planning
IncludesA Study of Research-based
Strategies, Methods, and Models.
88
  • A Few Minutes
  • With The Research
  • Presenter
  • Dr. Donna Carr, Consultant
  • and Virginia Liaison
  • Edvantia
  • (formerly AEL, Inc.)

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Policy Analysis for California Education PACE is
an independent research center that aims to
enrich education policy debates with sound
analysis and hard evidence--from preschool, to
K-12, to higher education.
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The Education Trust March 2006
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Invaluable Research
Closing the Achievement Gap
Achievement Gaps
Achievement Gap
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Students in Poor Schools Receive As for Work
That Would Earn Cs in Affluent Schools
Education Trust Improving Achievement and
Closing Gaps Between Groups Lessons from
Schools on the Performance Frontier, February
2006
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Organizing Todays Thoughts
GO8
  • Focus School Improvement Planning Around
    All-Staff Collaboration and Integration of
    Services.
  • Make Decisions About Improving Student
    Achievement Based on Research.

100
Effective School Improvement Planning Includes
  • Job-Embedded
  • Presenter
  • Marsha Owens, Accreditation Specialist
  • Office of School Improvement
  • Virginia Department of Education

Professional Development
101
Who Moved My Cheese?
  • Underneath the surface torrent of complaints
    and cynical humor and eye-rolling, there is a
    hidden river of passion and commitment which is
    the reason the complaints even exist.
  • Robert Kegan

102
So What Exactly is Job-Embedded Professional
Development?
  • Characteristics of Job-Embedded Professional
    Development
  • Weaves Seamlessly Into the School Day
  • Occurs in Learning Communities
  • Requires Collective Responsibility for Learning
  • Is Authentic and Meaningful
  • Requires That Staff Members Write
    Self-Evaluations, Create Professional Portfolios,
    and Undergo Peer Review

103
Professional Development That Improves Student
Learning Will
  • Be Data Driven
  • Reflect School and Division
  • Goals and Objectives
  • Reflect State Requirements
  • Be Formalized in Division
  • Policy, as well as in Systems and Practices

104
Effective Learning Designs for Adult Learners
  • Study of Theory and Practice
  • Observations
  • Discussions
  • Frequent Practice
  • Coaching
  • Minimizing Sit n Git

105
Professional Development That Addresses Adult
Learning Theory Will
  • Occur Within a Culture of Collegiality,
    Collaboration, Shared Decision-Making
  • Affirm the Value of Adults Prior Learning and
    Experiences
  • Attend to Physical Needs
  • Differentiate to Address All Learning Styles
  • Recognize the Importance of Trust and Safety
  • Allow Time to Practice, Fail, Succeed, and
    Implement

106
Evaluating Professional Development
  • Types of Evaluation
  • Both Summative and Formative
  • Participants Reaction
  • Did they like it?
  • Can they demonstrate it?
  • Organizational Change and Support
  • Does it impact the organization?
  • How?
  • Student Learning Outcomes
  • What was the impact on students?

107
Examples of Award Winning Professional Development
  • Teachers and Related Staff
  • Work in Teams to Develop Tests, Grade Student
    Work, Review Student Portfolios, Develop
    Curriculum, Assist with School Management
  • Conduct Action Research in Classrooms
  • Conduct Individual or Small Team Research
  • Develop Staff Study Groups

  • From NCREL

108
Who Is At the Table When the Professional
Development Calendar Is Being Planned?
Who Should Be At the Table?
109
Workshop Time
15 minutes
Choose a recorder and a reporter for each
workshop activity.
  • Picture yourself at a professional development
    planning table.
  • Pretend that whatever professional development
    topics/activities you and your school need will
    happen.
  • What professional development activities will
    increase student achievement in your school?
  • The Goal
  • Match the needs of the instructional program of
    your school to the
  • professional development.

Instructional Needs of the Schools
Professional Development
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Effective School Improvement Planning Examples
of Common Professional Development Topics
  • Effective Use of Assessment to Guide Instruction
  • Effective Reading and Mathematics Strategies
  • Effective Teaching and Learning Strategies for
    ESL Students
  • Effective Pre-School Transition Programs
  • Creating Effective Tutorial Programs
  • Creating Teacher Leaders
  • Creating School Environments Conducive to
    Parental Involvement
  • Motivating the Middle School Student

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Did Any School Include These Topics?
  • Increasing the Amount of Learning Time
  • Providing an Enriched/Accelerated Curriculum
  • Setting High Expectations for All Students
  • Meeting the Educational Needs of Historically
  • Undeserved Populations
  • Working with the __________ NCLB Subgroup
  • Improving Classroom Discipline
  • Bridging Central Office Instructional Staff and
    School
  • Staff
  • Understanding AYP

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Did Any School Include These Topics?(continued)
  • Teaching Reading To ensure that children
  • learn to read well, explicit and systematic
  • instruction must be provided in these five
    areas
  • 1. Phonemic Awareness
  • 2. Phonics
  • 3. Vocabulary Development
  • 4. Reading Fluency, Including Oral Reading Skills
  • 5. Reading Comprehension Strategies
  • Adopted by the
  • United States Department of Educations
  • National Reading First Program

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Did Any School Include These Topics?(continued)
  • What Are the Attributes of Successful Schools?
  • Long-Standing Research Says
  • Successful Schools Have
  • Appropriate Instructional Material
  • High Degree of Coordination Among Programs,
    Projects, Whole School
  • Active Parent Community Involvement
  • Closely Monitored Student Progress
  • Professional Development Training
  • From The United States Department of Educations
    National
  • Reading First Program

A
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Did Any School Include These Topics?(continued)
  • What Are the Attributes of Successful Schools?
  • Research Says Successful Schools Have
  • Recognized and Rewarded Excellence
  • Clear Program Goals
  • Strong Leadership
  • Program Planning Based on Evaluation Results
  • Positive School Climate
  • High Expectations for Student Learning
  • Maximum Use of Academic Learning Time

A
115
and What About These Topics?
  • New Attitude
  • Toward the Disadvantaged
  • Learner
  • Are teachers able to
  • Appreciate the intellectual accomplishments
    learners bring to school?
  • Build on their strengths rather than remediate
    deficits?
  • Learn about childrens cultures to avoid
    mistaking differences for deficits?
  • Make connections with students out-of-school
    experience and culture.

116
and These Topics
  • Reshaping
  • the
  • Curriculum
  • Focus on complex meaningful problems.
  • Fold the teaching of basic skills into meaningful
    tasks.
  • Align with the Standards of Learning.

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Breakthrough Topics or Just Good Teaching?
  • Apply
  • Best Practice Instructional
  • Strategies
  • Model powerful thinking strategies, and create
    environments that are stimulating and
    challenging.
  • Encourage multiple approaches.
  • Provide scaffolding to enable students to
    accomplish complex tasks.
  • Make student dialogue the central medium for
    teaching/learning.
  • What your students do changes not only the
    way they use their brains, but changes the actual
    physical structure of the brain. No matter how
    well planned, how interesting, stimulating,
    colorful, or relevant the lesson, if the teacher
    does
  • all the interacting with the material, the
  • TEACHERS--NOT THE STUDENTS brain will grow.

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That Was Then
  • After-School Staff Meetings/Workshops
  • Attending a One-Shot Presentation
  • Attending a Graduate Class
  • Top Down Planning

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This Is Now
  • PD must. . .
  • Focus On Improving Student Achievement
  • Use Adult Learning Theory
  • Recognize Difficulty of Change for Adults
  • Be Evaluated and Monitored
  • Be Job-Embedded and
  • Sustained

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Organizing Todays Thoughts
GO9
  • Plan Professional Development
  • To Be
  • Embedded and Sustained.

121
Todays
  • School Improvement Planning Objectives

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Through Effective School Improvement Planning
  • GO1
  • Mount the Courage to Look At the
  • Entire Schools Strengths and
  • Weaknessesthe Good, the Bad, and
  • the Ugly.
  • GO2
  • Conduct a Comprehensive Needs
  • Assessment, and Consider Areas
  • Beyond Academic Performance.
  • A. Academic Performance
  • B. Administration/Staff
  • C. Socio-Economic School Status
  • D. Instructional Program
  • E. Parent and Community Involvement
  • F. Technology and School Facilities
  • G. School Culture and School Climate
  • H. Use of Fiscal Resources
  • GO4
  • Include in the Needs Assessment an
  • In-depth Look at Academic Data, and
  • Disaggregate, Disaggregate, Disaggregate.
  • GO5
  • Keep Your Eye On the Benchmarks /
  • Targets / AMOs Now Through 2014. Re-
  • evaluate and Revise the Three/Two-Year
  • School Improvement Plan Accordingly.
  • GO6
  • Collect and Analyze Data On an Ongoing
  • Basis. Formative Assessments Are a
  • Necessary Part of the Ongoing Needs
  • Assessment. The Purpose is To Drive
  • Instructional Change, As Needed.

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Through Effective School Improvement Planning
  • Which of the nine themes is the most important
  • to your continued school improvement planning?
  • GO7
  • Include Areas Other
  • Than Academic Performance in
  • the Needs Assessment. (SOA/NCLB
  • Connection)
  • GO8
  • Make Collaborative Decisions About
  • Improving Student Achievement
  • Based On Research.
  • GO9
  • Plan Job-Embedded
  • Professional Development.

124
  • Effective School Improvement Planning Will Result
    in
  • Schools Doing Something
  • Different.

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Hard Work
  • Changing Behaviors
  • Increasing Articulation
  • Within/Across Grade Levels
  • Thinking Big
  • Sharing Ideas, Materials, Resources
  • Setting Schoolwide High Expectations
  • Creating a Supportive
  • Risk- Taking Environment
  • Staying Current with the Research
  • Creating a No-Fault Environment
  • Teaching Child-by-Child
  • Believing All Children Can Learn
  • And then--Assessing
  • and
  • Re-Assessing

126
Todays Goal To Open More Doors of Opportunity
  • More Effective
  • Team/Collaborative Teaching
  • Individualized Instruction
  • Instructional Grouping
  • Parent Workshops
  • Pupil Services Coordination
  • Additional Technology
  • Mentoring Programs
  • Peer Coaching
  • Frequent Student Assessment
  • Business-School Partnerships
  • Research-based Programs
  • Elimination of Programs
  • More Effective
  • Volunteerism
  • Reduction in Class Size
  • In-class Instruction from Specialists
  • Strong Academic Reading and Mathematics Programs
  • Early Reading Interventions
  • Preschool Programs
  • GED Programs for Parents
  • Summer Enrichment Programs
  • Gifted and Talented Strategies
  • Before- and After-School Tutorials

127
But We Will Get There!There Improved Student
Achievement
Fully Accredited and Made AYP
128
Department of Education Contact Persons
  • Office of School Improvement
  • Kathleen Smith, Director (804) 786-5819
    kathleen.smith_at_doe.virginia.gov
  • Dr. Shelly Bazemore (804) 371-0117
    shelly.bazemore_at_doe.virginia.gov
  • Mia Gomes (804) 225-2657 mia.gomes_at_doe.virginia
    .gov
  • Dr. Mary Holm (804) 225-2064 mary.holm_at_doe.virgi
    nia.gov
  • Selena McBride (804) 371-4989
    selena.mcbride_at_doe.virginia.gov
  • Annette Monroe-Martin (804) 225-3146
    annette.monroe-martin_at_doe.virginia.gov
  • Kimberly Nunnally (804) 371-0909
    kimberly.nunnally_at_doe,virginia.gov
  • Marsha Owens (804) 692-0250 marsha.owens_at_doe.vir
    ginia.gov
  • Katie Rosenbaum (804) 225-2665
    catherine.rosenbaum_at_doe.virginia.gov
  • Brenda Spencer (804) 371-6201
    brenda.spencer_at_doe.virginia.gov
  • Office of Program Administration and
    Accountability (Title I Office Staff)
  • Roberta Schlicher, Director (804) 225-2870
    roberta.schlicher_at_doe.virginia.gov
  • Shady Clark, Jr. (804) 225-2901
    shady.clark_at_doe.virginia.gov
  • Doris (Gabie) Frazier (804) 225-2907
    gabie.frazier_at_doe.virginia.gov
  • Rita Ghazal (804) 225-2904 rita.ghazal_at_doe.virg
    inia.gov
  • Dr. Philip Iovino (804) 371-2934
    philip.iovino_at_doe.virginia.gov
  • Rebecca Marable (804) 371-0044
    rebecca.marable_at_doe.virginia.gov

129
Virginia Department of Education Office of
School Improvement http//www.doe.virginia.gov/VD
OE/SchoolImprovement/
Also On This Website Checklist and
Certification of SOA and NCLB School Improvement
Plan Requirements
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