Soutenance de stage Programmation Orient - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Soutenance de stage Programmation Orient PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 402978-YTU4M



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Soutenance de stage Programmation Orient

Description:

Soutenance de stage Programmation Orient e motion K vin Darty 7 septembre 2011 Responsable : Nicolas Sabouret * Introduction M thode de programmation R solution ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:644
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 31
Provided by: Kev975
Learn more at: http://www-desir.lip6.fr
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Soutenance de stage Programmation Orient


1
Soutenance de stageProgrammation Orientée
Émotion
  • Kévin Darty
  • 7 septembre 2011
  • Responsable Nicolas Sabouret

2
Introduction
  • Méthode de programmation
  • Résolution de problème Hartal 68
  • Informatique affective Darwinal. 02
  • Émotion
  • Cadre de programmation

3
Plan
  • Classe de problème
  • États de lart
  • Résolution de problème
  • Affective computing
  • Modèle
  • Implémentation
  • Évaluation
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliographie

4
Classe de problème
5
Classe de problème
  • Sans connaissance du but

6
Classe de problème
  • Sans connaissance du but
  • Multi objectifs

7
Classe de problème
  • Sans connaissance du but
  • Multi objectifs
  • Dynamique

8
Classe de problème
  • Sans connaissance du but
  • Multi objectifs
  • Dynamique
  • Ressources limitées

9
Classe de problème
  • Sans connaissance du but
  • Multi objectifs
  • Dynamique
  • Ressources limitées
  • Temps limité

10
Classe de problème
  • Sans connaissance du but
  • Multi objectifs
  • Dynamique
  • Ressources limitées
  • Temps limité
  • Partiellement observable

11
Classe de problème
  • Sans connaissance du but
  • Multi objectifs
  • Dynamique
  • Ressources limitées
  • Temps limité
  • Partiellement observable
  • Complexe

12
État de lart résolution de problème
  • Normatif
  • Exploration A Hartal 68
  • Optimum / Temps limité
  • Planification GraphPlan BlumFurst 97
  • Base de règle / Dynamique
  • / Problème abstrait

13
État de lart résolution de problème
  • Normatif
  • Exploration A Hartal 68
  • Optimum / Temps limité
  • Planification GraphPlan BlumFurst 97
  • Base de règle / Dynamique
  • Descriptif
  • Comportement FreeFlowHierarchies Tyrrell 93
  • Compromis / Problème abstrait
  • Animat MHiCS RobertGrillot 03
  • Adaptatif / Complexe
  • Architecture psychologique ACT-R Andersonal.
    04
  • Humain / Méthode simple

14
État de lart informatique affective
  • Mémoire
  • Mémoire à long terme AtkinsonShiffrin 68
  • Vécu ? mémorisation ? apprentissage possible
  • Mémoire de travail AtkinsonShiffrin 68 Miller
    56
  • Concentration ? Minimise lespace de recherche

15
État de lart informatique affective
  • Mémoire
  • Mémoire à long terme AtkinsonShiffrin 68
  • Vécu ? mémorisation ? apprentissage possible
  • Mémoire de travail AtkinsonShiffrin 68 Miller
    56
  • Concentration ? Minimise lespace de recherche
  • Émotion
  • Catégoriel Plutchik 80
  • Dimensionnel MehrabianRussell 74

16
Conclusion
  • Modélisation de la classe de problème ?
  • Résolution généralisée de problèmes ?
  • Heuristiques émotionnelles ?
  • Réduire la tâche du programmeur ?
  • Séparation problème / solution
  • Niveau dabstraction
  • Solveur Orienté Émotion automatisé
  • Environnement de programmation aisé

17
Modèle (1/4) architecture
18
Modèle (2/4) Environnement
  •  

19
Modèle (3/4) Solution
  •  

20
Modèle (4/4) Solveur
  •  

21
Implémentation (1/2)
22
Implémentation (2/2)
23
Évaluation (1/4) Labyrinthe
  •  

24
Évaluation (2/4) Conclusion
  • Problème
  • Dynamique
  • Partiellement observable
  • A temps limité
  • Séparation problème / solution
  • Heuristiques émotionnelles
  • Comportements adaptés
  • Mise en œuvre rapide

25
Évaluation (3/4) Protocole
  • Testeurs humains
  • Similitudes sur une même instance de labyrinthe
  • Taux de réussite
  • Séquences dactions Levenshtein 66
  • Nombres de tours
  • Nombres dactions
  • Trésors récoltés
  • Tests
  • 2 configurations avec/sans monstres
  • 30 personnes X 4 instances de labyrinthe

26
Évaluation (4/4) Attentes
  • Taux de réussite proches
  • Longueurs de séquence et nombres de tour
    équivalents
  • Comportements similaires
  • Logique parcours
  • Émotionnel réaction aux perceptions par un
    choix de comportement semblable

27
Conclusion perspectives
  • Modélisation de la classe de problème
  • Tache réduite
  • Séparation problème / solution
  • Appraisal automatisé
  • Heuristiques émotionnelles indépendantes du
    problème
  • Comportement adapté du solveur
  • Réaction par émotion
  • Concentration via les filtres et la WM
  • Utilisation stricte de la mémoire
  • Évolution de limportance dune perception
  • Apprentissage du critère de dominance
  • Application du protocole dévaluation

28
Bibliographie (1/2)
  • Andersonal. 04 Anderson, J.R. and Bothell, D.
    and Byrne, M.D. and Douglass, S. and Lebiere, C.
    and Qin, Y. An integrated theory of the mind.
    Psychological review, vol.111.41036, 2004.
  • AtkinsonShiffrin 68 Atkinson, R.C. and
    Shiffrin, R.M. Human memory A proposed system
    and its control processes. The psychology of
    learning and motivation Advances in research and
    theory, vol. 289-195, 1968.
  • BaarsFranklin 09 Baars, B.J. and Franklin, S.
    Consciousness is computational The LIDA model of
    global workspace theory. International Journal of
    Machine Consciousness, vol. 123-32, 2009.
  • Baars 05 Baars, B.J. Global workspace theory of
    consciousness toward a cognitive neuroscience of
    human experience. Progress in brain research,
    vol. 15045-53, 2005.
  • BatraHolbrook 90 Batra, R. and Holbrook, M.B.
    Developing a typology of affective responses to
    advertising. Psychology and Marketing,
    vol.7.111-25, 1990.
  • BlumFurst 97 A. Blum et M. Furst. Fast
    Planning Through Planning Graph Analysis.
    Artificial Intelligence, 90281-300, 1997.
  • BonnetGeffner 98 Bonnet, B. and Geffner, H.
    HSP Heuristic search planner. Citeseer, 1998.
  • Caplat 02 Caplat, G. Modélisation cognitive
    résolutions de problèmes, Presses polytechniques
    et universitaires romandes, 2002.
  • Conklin 06 Conklin, J. Wicked problems social
    complexity. Citeseer, 2006.
  • Darwinal. 02 Darwin, C. and Ekman, P. and
    Prodger, P. The expression of the emotions in man
    and animals, Oxford University Press, 2002.
  • DoKambhampati 01 Do, M.B. and Kambhampati, S.
    Sapa A domain-independent heuristic metric
    temporal planner. Proceedings of the 6th European
    Conference on Planning, 190-120, 2001.
  • EdellBurke 87 Edell, J.A. and Burke, M.C. The
    power of feelings in understanding advertising
    effects. The Journal of Consumer Research, vol.
    14.3421-433, 1987.
  • FikesNilsson 71 Fikes, R.E. and Nilsson, N.J.
    STRIPS A new approach to the application of
    theorem proving to problem solving. Artificial
    intelligence, vol2.3/4189-208, 1971.
  • Greeno 78 Greeno, J.G. Natures of
    problem-solving abilities. Lawrence Erlbaum,
    1978.
  • GuillotDaucé 03 Guillot, A. Daucé, E.
    Approche dynamique de la cognition artificielle.
    Hèrmes Scienes Publications, 2003.
  • Hartal 68 Hart, P.E., Nilsson, N.J. et
    Raphael, B. A formal basis for the heuristic
    determination of minimum cost paths. Systems
    Science and Cybernetics, IEEE Transactions on,
    4100-107, 1968.
  • HoffmannNebel 01 Hoffmann, J. et Nebel, B. FF
    The fast-forward planning system. Journal of
    Artificial Intelligence Research, 14.1253-302,
    2001.
  • Jamesal. 81 James, W. and Burkhardt, F. and
    Bowers, F. and Skrupskelis, I.K. The principles
    of psychology, Harvard University Press, vol. 12,
    1981.
  • LazarusFolkman 96 Lazarus, R. Folkman, S.
    Stress, appraisal and coping. Springer, 1996.

29
Bibliographie (2/2)
  • Levenshtein 66 Levenshtein, V.I. Binary codes
    capable of correcting deletions, insertions, and
    reversals. Soviet Physics Doklady, vol.
    10,8707-710, 1966.
  • MehrabianRussell 74 Mehrabian, A. and Russell,
    J.A. An approach to environmental psychology. the
    MIT Press, 1974.
  • Miller 56 Miller, G.A. The magical number
    seven, plus or minus two some limits on our
    capacity for processing information.
    Psychological review. Vol 63.2, 81, 1956.
  • ParkKoelling 89 Park, Y.B. and Koelling, C.P.
    An interactive computerized algorithm for
    multicriteria vehicle routing problems. Computers
    Industrial Engineering, vol. 16.4477-490,
    1989.
  • Plutchik 80 Plutchik, R. Emotion A
    psychoevolutionary synthesis. Harper Row New
    York, 1980.
  • RittelWebber 73 Rittel, H.W.J. and Webber,
    M.M. Dilemmas in a general theory of planning.
    Policy sciences, 4.2155-169, 1973.
  • RobertGrillot 03 Robert, G. and Guillot, A.
    MHiCS, a modular and hierarchical classifier
    systems architecture for bots. 4th International
    Conference on Intelligent Games and Simulation
    (GAME-ON03), 140-144, 2003.
  • RosenblattPayton 89 Rosenblatt, J.K. Payton,
    D.W. A fine-grained alternative to the
    subsumption architecture for mobile robot
    control. IEEE/INNS International Joint Conference
    on Neural Networks, 317-323, 1989.
  • Rosenbloomal. 93 Rosenbloom, P.S. Laird, J.
    Newell, A. The SOAR papers Research on
    integrated intelligence. Mit Press Cambridge,
    vol. 1, 1993.
  • Russell 80 Russell, J.A. A circumplex model of
    affect.Journal of personality and social
    psychology, vol. 39.61161, 1980.
  • Schmeichelal. 08 Schmeichel, B.J. and
    Volokhov, R.N. and Demaree, H.A. Working memory
    capacity and the self-regulation of emotional
    expression and experience. Journal of Personality
    and Social Psychology, vol. 95.61526, 2008
  • Tyrrell 93 Tyrrell, T. The use of hierarchies
    for action selection, Adaptive Behavior, vol.
    1.4387, 1993.

30
Questions
About PowerShow.com