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REAL WORK FOR REAL PAY: Inclusive Employment

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Only 35% of people with disabilities reported being employed full time or part ... CRACKER BARREL. POSITION. FOOD PREP ASSISTANT. Meet Ryan. Nursery Worker. Duties: ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: REAL WORK FOR REAL PAY: Inclusive Employment


1
REAL WORK FOR REAL PAY Inclusive Employment
  • Vancouver, British Columbia
  • June 11, 2007

2
WHY WORK?
  • MAXIMIZING HUMAN POTENTIAL!

3
The Goals
  • Good Pay
  • Health care benefits
  • Control over job selection/work conditions
  • Upward mobility
  • Improving social and community connections and
    integration
  • Therapeutic benefits

4
  • WORK IS THE GREAT EQUALIZER

5
  • WHICH WOULD YOU
  • WANT…THIS

6
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7
  • OR THIS

8
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9
  • SO…. How Are We Doing?

10
According to a 2004 Louis Harris Poll
  • Only 35 of people with disabilities reported
    being employed full time or part time, compared
    with 78 of those who do not have disabilities.
  • Three times as many people with disabilities live
    in poverty, with annual household incomes below
    15,000 (26 versus 9)

11
Louis Harris Poll (Contd)
  • People with disabilities remain twice as likely
    to drop out of high school (21 versus 10)

12
  • In Canada, persons with disabilities participate
    in employment at a significantly lower rate than
    for persons without disabilities.
  • B.C. Participation and Limitation Survey,
    2001

13
  • Nationally, 42 of persons with disabilities are
    employed, compared to 74 of persons without
    disabilities, a 32 difference.
  • B.C. Participation and Limitation Survey,
    2001

14
  • In BC, 44 of persons with disabilities are
    employed, compared to 72 of persons without
    disabilities, a 28 difference.
  • B.C. Participation and Limitation Survey,
    2001

15
  • SEGREGATION IS STILL PREVALENT

16
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17
  • What do sheltered Workshop Participants think?

18
  • 78 of persons with Intellectual Disabilities
    said they would prefer employment OUTSIDE
    workshops
  • (N 203)
  • (Migliore, et al., 2007)

19
  • What Does the Community Think About People with
    Disabilities Who Work?

20
According to a 2004 Gallup Poll
  • Most of the 800 respondents in the Gallup Poll
    indicated they had direct experience with people
    with disabilities in a work environment.
  • About 75 of the participants have at some point
    worked directly with someone with a disability
    and/or received services as a customer by a
    person with a disability.

21
Gallup Poll (Contd)
  • Overall 92 of the participants were more
    favorable toward giving their business to
    companies that hire people with disabilities.
  • Siperstein, et al., 2006 (JVR)

22
  • In Canada 680 nondisabled people were
    surveyed87 favored integrated employment.
  • (Burge, et al., 2007)

23
  • WHAT DOES THE U.S. CONGRESS THINK OF SEGREGATED
    EMPLOYMENT?

24
ACCORDING TO SENATOR EDWARD KENNEDY
  • Disabled Americans want to work and contribute to
    their communities in the same way as their
    non-disabled friends and families. They have
    dreams just like everyone else. For far too
    long, they have been denied the talents and
    contributions of thousands of our fellow
    citizens, just because they are disabled.
  • October 20, 2005

25
  • SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT THERE IS ANOTHER WAY

26
SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT
  • Paid work in integrated settings
  • Employees are hired, supervised and paid by the
    business
  • Employment specialist or coworkers provide
    ongoing or intermittent support

27
MEET KIT
28
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29
FUNCTIONAL POSITIVES
  • Walks and stands
  • Hand use
  • Uses body language to communicate
  • Polite
  • Performs task in sequence
  • No financial obstacles
  • Supportive family

30
MAJOR PERCEIVED BARRIERS
  • Severe mental retardation
  • Autism
  • Limited communication skills
  • Limited strength and endurance
  • Unusual behaviors (rocks body, sucks fingers,
    flaps hands)
  • Needs frequent prompting to stay on task
  • Cannot distinguish between work supplies
  • No functional reading
  • Limited transportation options

31
  • JOB FINDING TECHNIQUES USED

32
  • Used Situational Assessments to identify
    interests and abilities
  • Job Coach spent time to develop rapport with Kit
  • Job Coach sought a team oriented work environment
  • Kit visited jobsite several times to help
    determine if she liked it

33
EMPLOYER
  • Spaghetti Warehouse

34
  • CHALLENGING WORK ISSUES

35
  • Transportation
  • Taking off and putting on coat
  • Clocking in and out
  • Putting on gloves
  • Setting up work station
  • Replenishing supplies
  • Learning job tasks
  • Needing constant prompts to perform work

36
  • WORK ACCOMMODATIONS SUPPORTS

37
  • Transportation provided by school on weekdays and
    family on weekends
  • Magnetic scanning device
  • Manager/co-worker assistance
  • Job coach/systematic instruction
  • Audio prompting reinforcement system

38
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39
  • MEET RONNIE

40
Ronnie
  • Self Employment
  • Keep It Kleen
  • Sterilizes Towels
  • Individual Training Account Purchases
  • High-tech washer and dryer
  • Magnetic advertising panels for Jeep
  • Business License
  • Jeep Repair
  • Total Individual Training Account expenditures
    4,200

41
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42
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43
  • MEET KELLY

44
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45
FUNCTIONAL POSITIVIES
  • Walks and stands
  • Hand use
  • Friendly and outgoing
  • Works well with reinforcement
  • Good problem solving skills
  • Experience in assisting in school cafeteria
  • No financial obstacles
  • Supportive family

46
  • CHALLENGING WORK ISSUES

47
MAJOR PERCEIVED BARRIERS
  • Severe mental retardation
  • Tactile defensive
  • Needs to be given one direction at a time
  • Easily distracted
  • Limited communication skills responds using
    yes/no
  • Second grade reading level
  • No math skills
  • Needs structured environment
  • Limited transportation options

48
  • JOB FINDING TECHNIQUES USED

49
  • Interviewed family, Kelly, and school personnel
    on likes and dislikes
  • Observed Kelly in classroom and in community
    setting
  • Appealed to business sense of community
    involvement
  • Carved job to help food prep worker during busy
    times
  • Coached employer on best way to interview Kelly
  • Sought employer willing to assign mentors to Kelly

50
EMPLOYER
  • CRACKER BARREL

51
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52
POSITION
  • FOOD PREP ASSISTANT

53
Meet Ryan

54
Nursery Worker
  • Duties
  • Outdoor Assist Nursery Staff with watering
    plants, loading unloading plant stock, clean
    nursery area
  • Hours 12 per wk
  • Pay 6.50 per hour

55
promotion
  • Ryan was performing his job tasks so well, the
    manager created indoor tasks for Ryan to do
    during off seasons when hours are usually cut

56
Indoor Assistant
  • Duties
  • Indoor Clean employee/office areas and restrooms

57
Ryan at Work

58
Ryans Workplace Supports
  • Supports on the Job
  • Team atmosphere
  • Supportive management
  • Managements willingness to create job tasks
  • Supported Employment
  • Training of specific tasks
  • Memory strategies
  • Continued support throughout employment

59
  • Supported Employment Implementation. Where Is It
    Working? How Well?

60
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61
Participation Supported Employment - 2002
  • 483,000 in Day/Work programs
  • 24 in supported employment
  • 76 in predominantly segregated settings
  • Parallel growth rates in supported and day
    programs

62
Connecticut
63
Vermont
64
VERMONT
  • Division of Developmental Services funds cannot
    be used at all to fund the following
    services/settings
  • Congregate (defined as 3 or more individuals)
    residential settings for children under 18 years
    old5
  • Institutional settings (e.g., nursing facilities,
    etc.) for providing community supports other
    than for people living, working or volunteering
    in the setting.
  • Effective July 1, 2004
  • 5 Existing group home for children with
    emotional, behavioral and/or developmental
    disabilities in Chittenden County is
    grandfathered in.

65
Washington State
66
  • How Do We Change the System?

67
Systems Change Methods
  • Support Self Determination
  • Focus on Job Outcomes
  • Expand Relations with Business
  • Mission Driven Systems
  • Align Dollars with Mission

68
Community Participation
  • Community Participation. When people with
    disabilities are segregated from community life,
    all Vermonters are diminished. Effective
    services and supports foster full community
    participation and personal relationships with
    other members of the community. Community
    participation is increased when people with
    disabilities meet their everyday needs through
    resources available to all members of the
    community.

69
(Continued)
  • Employment. The goal of job support is to obtain
    and maintain paid employment in regular
    employment settings.

70
(Continued)
  • Accessibility. Services must be geographically
    available so that people with developmental
    disabilities and their families are not required
    to move to gain access to needed services,
    thereby forfeiting natural community support
    systems.

71
Support Self Determination
  • Self Determination
  • Informed Choice
  • Report Cards
  • Career Options

72
Focus on Integrated Job Outcomes
  • Defined Services Support Outcomes
  • Services Consistent w/ Best Practices
  • Truly Individualized Support Plans
  • Measure Progress

73
Expand Relations with Business
  • Business Leadership Networks
  • Workforce Investment Boards
  • Business as an Informed Partner

74
Mission Driven Systems
  • Legislation
  • State Level Initiatives
  • Consistency Across Agencies

75
Align Dollars with Mission
  • Rates Consistent with Market
  • Performance Based Funding
  • Flexible Funding Accounts
  • Support Customized Employment Outcomes

76
Quality Indicator 1 Meaningful Competitive
Employment
  • Is it an integrated work setting?
  • Are employees hired, supervised and paid by the
    business?
  • Are employment benefits commensurate with
    non-disabled coworkers?

77
Quality Indicator 2 Informed Choice, Control
Satisfaction
  • Who selects the job coach?
  • Who selects the job?
  • Does the new employee like the job?
  • Is the new employee satisfied with the service
    and worksupports?
  • Is the new employee able and willing to retain
    the job?

78
Quality Indicator 3 Level and Nature of Support
  • Do customers assist in selecting the support
    options?
  • Does the program advocate moving from the least
    intrusive level of support to a more intrusive
    support option based upon customer need?
  • Does the program have staff skilled in
    identifying, matching and fading possible
    workplace supports options?

79
Quality Indicator 4 Amount of Hours Worked
Weekly
  • What percentage of program participants work in
    competitive employment over 30 hr/wk or under 20
    hr/wk?
  • For those working under 30 hr/wk how many hours
    of alternative programming are provided.
  • What is the satisfaction level of participants
    with their hr/wk?

80
Quality Indicator 5 Well Coordinated Job
Retention System
  • What percentage of individuals placed in
    competitive employment retain their jobs for less
    than 90 days / 90 days / 180 days over 180 days?
  • What is the replacement rate?
  • What are the reasons for job separation?
  • Record and schedule for monitoring job stability?
  • Is there identifiable extended services funding
    for planning and unplanned responses to retention
    issues?

81
Quality Indicator 6 Maximizing Integration
Community Participation
  • Does the company offer opportunities for physical
    and social integration such as common break areas
    / company socials?
  • Does the employees work area facilitate physical
    and/or social interactions?
  • In what activities does the customer engage in
    the community (friends, clubs, groups)?
  • Is the employee satisfied with the job and level
    of community integration?

82
Quality Indicator 7 Employer Satisfaction
  • Does the program develop business profiles
    complete with business culture notations and
    language specific to the business?
  • Is there staff development program that stresses
    the use of business friendly language?
  • Does the program engage in community outreach
    with disability awareness training?
  • Does the program serve as a liaison for the
    business and people with disabilities?

83
  • What Does Supported Employment Cost?

84
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85
Vocational Rehabilitation Cost in Wisconsin
  • Mental Retardation - 8,225
  • (N503)
  • Mental Illness - 5814
  • (N 244)
  • Autism - 6,705
  • (N46

86
Marketing, Networking and Job Development
87
Marketing - Networking
  • Organizational Marketing
  • Understanding the Needs (business us)
  • Business Partnerships
  • Business Presentations

88
Old Way of Doing Business
  • One Person One Job!
  • Charity or it is the nice/right thing to do!
  • Low Expectations of people with disabilities!
  • Exclude employers from policy making!

89
New Way of Doing Business
  • Value the Employer as a customer!
  • Understand the Business needs and culture!
  • Meeting the Needs of the Business!
  • Implement a Marketing Strategy

90
Marketing
  • An activity that satisfies the needs and wants of
    customers through an exchange process!
  • Basic to process Each Party receives a valued
    good or service!

91
Key to Marketing Success
  • Better services for employers equals better
    services for people with disabilities!
  • It is all about
  • RELATIONSHIPS, RELATIONSHIPS, RELATIONSHIPS,
    RELATIONSHIPS MORE RELATIONSHIPS!!!!!!!

92
Marketing Things to Know
  • Something about the business.
  • What do they offer/produce/sell.
  • Significant factors affecting the business.
  • Growth or change over past year.
  • Future directions for the business.
  • Greatest demands and pressures.
  • Changes in technology.

93
Remember
  • Your goal is to find out information in order to
    help the business with their bottom lines----
    (there are more than one bottom line)

94
WHO ARE YOU???
  • To market your organization, yourself, your
    customers you need a clear sense of purpose
    identity!!
  • Why should I do business with you instead of
    your competitor???
  • Tell us about you and your organization!

95
Understanding Business
  • Myths Fears
  • Government Jargon
  • Lack of Urgency
  • Dont understand the business culture
  • Need a diverse workforce
  • Future labor shortage

96
Understanding Us!
  • Touch economic times!
  • Our folks face more difficult barriers which
    makes it difficult to compete with others!
  • Not all of the people we work with want to go to
    work!
  • Job developers and managers have little, if any
    training on how to work with business!
  • Attitudes of job developers and managers!
  • VCU-RRTC, 2003

97
New Approach
  • Move from a social work salesperson to a
    visionary leader, effective manager, supportive
    supervisor!
  • We go from an apply for an opening approach to
    creating new opportunities

98
Business Partnerships- why do they value
partnerships?
  • Mutual benefits!
  • Opportunities to hire talented people!
  • More choices in hiring!
  • Knowledge leveraging additional resources!

99
How can the Public Sector make services more
appealing?
  • Organize a single point of contact!
  • Attend participate in employer organizations!
  • Educate business on disability issues
    accommodations!
  • Advertise success stories!
  • Careful pre-screening to match applicants
  • Use Business to Business marketing use business
    language!

100
What other HR needs beyond referral of job
candidates could be provided to Business?
  • Service after the placement!- job retention
    services
  • Joint training ventures to up grade candidates
    skills!
  • On demand training consultation on Disability
    issues
  • Office work environment assessment!

101
What incentives would attract more employers to
enter partnerships?
  • Single point of contact!
  • Marketing that links partnerships to bottom line
    diversity issues!
  • Positive exposure for company!
  • Simplified process!
  • Tax incentives if simple and easy to use!
  • Any activity that shows concern for bottom line!

102
What would businesses be willing to contribute to
a partnership?
  • Time to meet with representatives!
  • Share experiences with other businesses!
  • Co-host training events!
  • Welcome rehabilitation to meetings of business
    organizations!

103
Supported Employment Funding Overview
104
THE FUNDING FRAMEWORK
  • Fund Process / Fund Outcomes
  • Fund Programs / Fund People
  • Fund Status Quo / Fund Change

105
SERVICE/SUPPORT COMPONENTS
  • Assess Work Interest
  • Establish Job and Career Goals
  • Complete an Effective Job Match
  • Support Work Performance
  • Insure Job Stability
  • Provide Ongoing Supports
  • Assist with Community Supports
  • Respond to Career Interests

106
SERVICE PITFALLS
  • Failure to Plan
  • Poor Job Match
  • Prolonged Training Period at Workplace
  • Dependence on Job Coach/Difficulty Fading
  • Lack of Co-worker Involvement
  • Funding Breakdowns Across Agencies
  • Ignoring Career Interests

107
FUNDING and RESOURCE OPTIONS
  • Vocational Rehabilitation
  • Fees/contracts from MH/MR/DD agencies, including
    Home Community Based Waiver
  • Other Public Funds
  • S.S.A. Work Incentives (PASS/IRWE/TICKET)
  • Private Funding (e.g.United Way)
  • One Stop Career Centers

108
BALANCING FUNDING INTERESTS
  • Consumers
  • Funding Agencies
  • Supported Employment Service Agencies

109
CONSUMERS FUNDING
  • Services are available.
  • Services are individualized and customized as
    needed.
  • Incentives are in place to encourage progress to
    valued outcomes.

110
AGENCIES FUNDING
  • Cost Effective An appropriate supported
    employment outcome is achieved and maintained
  • Cost Efficient An appropriate return is
    achieved for the dollars expended

111
S.E. Service Programs Funding
  • Hire, appropriately pay, and maintain quality
    staff
  • Accept referrals made by community
  • Provide effective staff development
  • Offer quality services

112
FUNDING PITFALLS
  • Consumers needing services cannot access
    Supported Employment
  • Services non-responsive to individual job match
    and ongoing support needs
  • Inequities in rates/funding create inequities in
    service availability
  • Limited career oriented career and job
    replacement activities

113
Funding Options
  • Grants and Contracts
  • Fee for Service
  • Performance Based Funding
  • Other
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