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Request for Proposals and Proposal Writing (non-profit and profit)

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Request for Proposals and Proposal Writing (non-profit and profit) Preliminary Proposal Non-profit Many grantmakers permit grant applications by invitation only ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Request for Proposals and Proposal Writing (non-profit and profit)


1
Request for Proposalsand Proposal
Writing(non-profit and profit)
2
Preliminary Proposal Non-profit
  • Many grantmakers permit grant applications by
    invitation only, and require potential grant
    recipients to submit preliminary proposals in the
    form of inquiry letters in order to be invited to
    submit a Full Proposal.Inquiry letters are
    designed to convince the grantmaker to consider
    your request. They provide you the opportunity to
    give the grantmaker a snapshot of your proposed
    project/program. Be sure to establish a
    connection between your proposal's goals and the
    grantmaker's priorities, and focus on detail,
    clarity, and conciseness, while conveying the
    impact your proposal will make on the need or
    problem you are addressing.

3
Inquiry Letter main elements
  • Organization Overview/Purpose
  • State Reason for and Amount of Funding Request
  • Describe Needs or Problem (including target
    population, statistics, examples)
  • Describe Project or Program
  • List other Project Funders (prospective and
    committed)
  • Request Funding Application
  • Typical inquiry letters, usually a maximum of 2-3
    pages, include the following componentsCOVERSHE
    ET Organization Name, Address, City, State, Zip
    Code, Country, Contact Name, Title, Telephone,
    Fax, E-mail Address

4
Cont
  • INTRODUCTION
  • The mission of your organization (one paragraph)
  • The purpose of your request (one paragraph)
  • How your request fits the grantmaker's funding
    priorities (one sentence)
  • Total annual general operating budget
  • Fiscal Year
  • Total proposed project/program budget (if other
    than general support)
  • Grant amount being requested
  • Matching funds committed from other funding
    sources
  • Proposed grant project/program time frame
    (beginning and ending dates)
  • Tax exempt status

5
Cont
  • NARRATIVE (maximum of 1/2 page)A concise
    narrative or a synopsis of the proposed
    project/program, that generally covers the
    following
  • The purpose of the request (project or program)
  • The problem or need being addressed, and how you
    will address the identified problem or need
  • The population or community served by your
    organization
  • How your project or program will promote
    long-term change
  • FINANCIAL INFORMATIONFor project or program
    finding requests, you will usually need to submit
    both a project/program budget and a general
    operating budget. However, for general support
    requests, you will usually only need to submit a
    general operating budget.

6
Full Proposal Non-profit
  • Always follow the exact specifications of the
    grantmakers in their grant applications, Requests
    for Proposals (RFPs) and guidelines. Full
    Proposals are generally a maximum of 15 pages
    (single-spaced) and include a Cover Letter, Cover
    Sheet, Narrative, Budget, Qualifications,
    Conclusion and Appendices, as follows)
  • Cover Sheet - a case statement and proposal
    summary
  • Needs Assessment - a concise demonstration of the
    specific situation, opportunity, problem, issue,
    need, and the community your proposal addresses
  • Program Goals and Objectives - a succinct
    description of the proposed project/program's
    outcome and accomplishments in measurable terms,
    and how it matches the funder's interests
  • Methodology - a rational, direct, chronological
    description of the proposed project and the
    process used to achieve the outcome and
    accomplishments
  • Evaluation - the plan for meeting performance and
    producing the program/project

7
Cont
  • Budget/Funding Requirements - a realistic budget
    with a detailed explanation of the funding
    request, committed matching funds, evidence of
    sound fiscal management, and long term funding
    plan
  • Qualifications - your organization's background,
    its funding history, board involvement and staff
    qualifications, and its capacity to carry out
    your proposal
  • Conclusion - a brief, concise summary of your
    proposal
  • Appendices - additional attachments required by
    the funder, such as proof of tax-exempt status,
    organizational and financial documents,
    staff/board lists, support/commitment
    letters.Unless required, do not include an
    index or table of contents, or bind the proposal,
    and be sure to sign it and submit the number of
    copies requested by the grantmaker.

8
Federal Government RFP
  • What's in a typical Federal Government RFP?
  • Federal Government RFP format and composition is
    mandated by the Federal Acquisition Regulation
    (FAR). They are typically broken down into
    sections that are identified by letter. Here is a
    list of what is in each section
  • Section A. Information to offerors or
    quotersIdentifies the title of the procurement,
    procurement number, point of contact (POC), how
    to acknowledge amendments and how to indicate No
    Response if you decide not to bid.
  • Section B. Supplies or Services and
    Price/CostsThis is where you provide your
    pricing. It defines the type of contract,
    identifies Contract Line Items (CLINs), and
    Subcontract Line Items (SLINs) that identify
    billable items, describes the period of
    performance, identifies option periods (if any),
    and provides cost and pricing guidelines. This
    section is often presented and responded to in
    tabular form.
  • Section C. Statement of Work (SOW)Describes what
    the Government wants you to do or supply. Outside
    of your pricing, most of your proposal will be
    responding to this section, tell them how you
    will deliver what they need. Sometimes this
    section is contained in a separate appendix and
    is frequently associated with other appendices in
    Section J with other details to enable the bidder
    to understand the nature and scope of the tasks
    requested in Section C.

9
Cont
  • Section D. Packages and MarkingDefines how all
    contract deliverables such as reports and
    material will be packaged and shipped. This
    information is important as these instructions
    may effect costs and raise logistics issues.
  • Section E. Inspection and AcceptanceDescribes
    the process by which the Government will
    officially accept deliverables and what to do if
    the work is not accepted. This can also affect
    costs and identifies tasks you must be prepared
    to undertake.
  • Section F. Deliveries or PerformanceDefines how
    the Government Contracting Officer will control
    the work performed and how you will deliver
    certain contract items.
  • Section G. Contract Administrative DataDescribes
    how the Government Contracting Officer and your
    firm will interact and how information will be
    exchanged in administration of the contract to
    ensure both performance and prompt payment.
  • Section H. Special Contract RequirementsContains
    a range of special contract requirements
    important to this particular procurement, such as
    procedures for managing changes to the original
    terms of the contract, government furnished
    equipment (GFE) requirements, and government
    furnished property (GFP) requirements.

10
Cont
  • Section I. Contract Clauses/General
    ProvisionsIdentifies the contract clauses
    incorporated by reference in the RFP. These
    clauses will be incorporated into the contract.
    While it doesnt require a separate response,
    its terms will be binding.
  • Section J. Attachments, ExhibitsLists the
    appendices to the RFP. These attachments can
    cover a wide range of subjects ranging from
    technical specifications through lists of GFE. It
    generally is used to provide data you need in
    order to respond to the Statement of Work.
  • Section K. Representations/Certifications and
    Statements of OfferorsContains things that you
    must certify to bid on this contract. These can
    include things such as certification that you
    have acted according to procurement integrity
    regulations, your taxpayer identification, the
    status of personnel, ownership of your firm, type
    of business organization, authorized negotiators,
    that your facilities are not segregated, that you
    comply with affirmative action guidelines,
    whether you qualify as a small business,
    disadvantaged business, and/or women owned
    business, etc.

11
Cont
  • Section L. Proposal Preparation Instructions and
    OtherProvides instructions for preparing your
    proposal. These include any formatting
    requirements, how they want the material
    organized/outlined, how to submit questions
    regarding the RFP or procurement, how the
    proposal is to be delivered, and sometimes
    notices, conditions, or other instructions.
  • Section M. Evaluation CriteriaDefines the
    factor, subfactors, and elements used to grade
    the proposal. Proposals are graded and then cost
    is considered to determine who wins the award and
    gets the contract.

12
How to be successful
  • Prove that you have a significant need or problem
    in your proposal.
  • Deliver an answer to the need, or solution to the
    problem, based on experience, ability, logic, and
    imagination throughout your proposal. Make sure
    your proposal describes a program/project for
    change.
  • Reflect planning, research and vision throughout
    your proposal.
  • Research grantmakers, including funding purposes
    and priorities, and applicant eligibility.
  • Determine whether the grantmakers' goals and
    objectives match your grantseeking purposes.

13
And
  • Target your proposal to grantmakers appropriate
    to your field and project, but do not limit your
    funding request to one source.
  • Contact the grantmaker, before you write your
    proposal, to be sure you clearly understand the
    grantmaker's guidelines.
  • Present your proposal in the appropriate and
    complete format, and include all required
    attachments.
  • State your organization's needs and objectives
    clearly and concisely. Write well. Do not waste
    words. Use active rather than passive verbs. Use
    proper grammar and correct spelling. Be clear,
    factual, supportable, and professional. A
    well-written proposal is a key factor in the
    grantmaker's decision-making process.

14
And
  • Present your proposal in the appropriate and
    complete format, and include all required
    attachments.
  • State your organization's needs and objectives
    clearly and concisely. Write well. Do not waste
    words. Use active rather than passive verbs. Use
    proper grammar and correct spelling. Be clear,
    factual, supportable, and professional. A
    well-written proposal is a key factor in the
    grantmaker's decision-making process.
  • Be clear about why you are seeking a grant, what
    you plan to do with the money, and why you are a
    good fit with the grantmaker's priorities.
    Prepare an interesting, persuasive and unique
    proposal.
  • Always cover the following important criteria
    project purpose, feasibility, community need,
    funds needed, applicant accountability and
    competence.

15
And finally
  • Answer these questions Who are you? How do you
    qualify? What do you want? What problem will you
    address and how? Who will benefit and how? What
    specific objectives will you accomplish and how?
    How will you measure your results? How does your
    funding request comply with the grantmaker's
    purpose, goals and objectives?
  • Demonstrate project logic and outcome, impact of
    funds, and community support. Be specific about
    broad goals, measurable objectives, and
    quantified outcomes.
  • Always follow the exact specifications of the
    grantmakers in their applications, Requests for
    Proposals (RFPs) and guidelines.
  • Follow-up with the grantmaker about the status,
    evaluation, and outcome of your proposal, after
    it is submitted. Request feedback about your
    proposal's strengths and weaknesses.
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