Wagon Trains from Tennessee and Alabama entered Texas after the Civil War. Early day Blueridge settl - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Wagon Trains from Tennessee and Alabama entered Texas after the Civil War. Early day Blueridge settl

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Soon, however, railheads in Kansas led cowboys up the Chisholm Trail to Abilene, ... Cowboys branding 'mavericks' in the 1880's. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Wagon Trains from Tennessee and Alabama entered Texas after the Civil War. Early day Blueridge settl


1
Wagon Trains from Tennessee and Alabama entered
Texas after the Civil War. Early day Blueridge
settlers were looking for a fresh start, and
Texas seemed to be the best place to find it.
2
1874 Red River view. Early immigrants make their
way in an overcrowded boat down the swollen Texas
river. Source http//www.printsoldandrare.com/tex
as/
3
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4
Kiowa and Cheyenne leaders pose in the White
House conservatory with Mary Todd Lincoln
(standing far right) on March 27, 1863, during
meetings with President Abraham Lincoln, who
hoped to prevent their lending aid to Confederate
forces. The two Cheyenne chiefs seated at the
left front, War Bonnet and Standing In the Water,
would be killed the next year in the Sand Creek
Massacre.
5
Southern Plains Indian tribes during the Red
River War and location of reservations. Map
courtesy of the Texas Historical Commission.
6
The threat of Indian raids was a constant source
of anxiety for settlers on the Texas frontier,
particularly after U.S. troops left Texas during
the Civil War years. Painting by Nola Davis,
courtesy of Fort Richardson SHS, Texas Parks and
Wildlife Department.
7
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8
U.S. Army columns of the Red River War. Courtesy
of the Texas Historical Commission.
9
A Kiowa ledger drawing possibly depicting the
Buffalo Wallow battle in 1874, one of several
clashes between Southern Plains Indians and the
U.S. Army during the Red River War.
10
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11
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12
Rath Wright's buffalo hide yard, showing 40,000
buffalo hides baled for shipment. Dodge City,
Kansas, 1878.
13
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14
Kiowa brave. Tow-An-Kee, son of Lone Wolf. Killed
in Texas in 1873. Photo, ca. 1867-1874, courtesy
of the Center for American History, Caldwell
Collection (03962), The University of Texas at
Austin.
Kiowa camp, ca. 1867-1874. Photograph courtesy of
the Center for American History, Frank Caldwell
Collection (10187), The University of Texas at
Austin.
15
Topin Tone-oneo, daughter of Kicking Bird. The
only one of the great Kiowa chief's children to
survive him, she was with the first group sent to
Carlisle Indian School in 1879. Source
http//www.texasbeyondhistory.net/forts/indians.ht
ml
Indians at Fort Marion. Indians of various tribes
who were captured in the Texas Red River Wars and
other Indian battles of the late 19th century
were imprisoned at this Florida military fort.
Photo ca. 1860s-1930s, courtesy the National
Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
(Lot 90-1 INV 09854500). Source
http//www.texasbeyondhistory.net/forts/indians.ht
ml
16
Pupils at Carlisle Indian school, Pennsylvania.
Established in 1879 by Richard Pratt, the school
attempted to assimilate Indian children into the
"white man's world" through education and
financial support. Among its students were four
of Comanche chief Quanah Parker's children and
those of others involved in the Texas Indian
Wars.
Source http//www.texasbeyondhistory.net/forts/in
dians.html
17
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18
Texas Cattle Trails Before the Civil War, the
Shawnee Trail (far right) led Texas cattlemen to
markets in Kansas City and St. Louis. Following
the war, increased settlement closed that route,
and in 1866 Charles Goodnight and Oliver Loving
blazed a trail west to the New Mexico and
Colorado markets, called the Goodnight-Loving
Trail (far left). Soon, however, railheads in
Kansas led cowboys up the Chisholm Trail to
Abilene, and up the Western Trail to Dodge City
and points north.
19
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20
Roundup on Texas Ranch
21
Cover of The Beef Bonanza How to Get Rich on the
Plains, by Gen. James. S. Brisbin, one of the
books that helped fuel the cattle boom of the
early 1880's. (Courtesy Beinecke Rare Book and
Manuscript Library, Yale University.)
22
Bucking Broncos
23
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24
Cowboys branding mavericks in the 1880's
25
"Second Guard." A cowboy camp at night in the
1880's, with some cowboys bedding down while
others prepare to head out for night duty
watching over the herd. Photograph by F. M.
Steele.
26
Cowboys branding "mavericks" in the 1880's. This
cowboy name for cattle without a brand can be
traced to Texas rancher Samuel Maverick, whose
habit of neglecting to brand his herd led his
neighbors to call an unbranded steer "one of
Maverick's." Photograph by F. M. Steele.
27
Cowboys eating dinner on the range. A typical
chuckwagon, like the one shown here, carried
potatoes, beans, bacon, dried fruit, cornmeal,
coffee and canned goods. (Library of Congress)
28
"Where we shine." Cowboys at the end of an 1897
roundup in Ward County, Texas, pose with their
herd of almost 2,000 cattle. By this time, barbed
wire had closed down the long cattle trails for
nearly two decades. Photographed by F. M.
Steele.
29
1871 Kansas-Transport of Texas Beef on the
Kansas-Pacific Railway-Scene at a Cattle-shoot in
Abilene, Kansas. This beautiful, hand colored
engraving is from the August 19, 1871 issue of
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper. Source
http//www.printsoldandrare.com/texas/
30
1882 Picture of a capture of a Texas Town by
cowboys. Source http//www.printsold
andrare.com/texas/
31
1882 Texas-Herders Driving Their Sheep, Menaced
by a Prairie Fire, To a Place of Safety. Source
http//www.printsoldandrare.com/texas
32
Dignitaries and railworkers gather to drive the
"golden spike" and join the tracks of the
transcontinental railroad at Promontory Point,
Utah, on May 10, 1869. The Central Pacific's
wood-burning locomotive, Jupiter, stands to the
left, the Union Pacific's coal-burning No. 119 to
the right.
33
The starting line for the first Oklahoma Land
Rush, April 22, 1889.
34
Homesteaders photographed in the 1880's by
Solomon Butcher in Custer County, Nebraska.
35
Exodusters waiting for a steamboat to carry them
westward in the late 1870's. (Library of
Congress.)
36
Homesteader Omer Yern and family photographed by
Solomon Butcher in Custer Country, Nebraska,
1886. (Courtesy Nebraska State Historical
Society.)
37
David Hilton and family pose for homestead
photographer Solomon Butcher, showing off their
prize possession, a pump organ. Butcher noted
that Mrs. Hilton insisted on having the organ
hauled into the yard, so her family portrait
would not reveal that the Hilton's still lived in
a sod house.
38
While preserving some traditions of their
homeland, settlers on the Texas frontier were
transformed by their experiences, becoming
"westerners."
39
Fenced in Ranch
40
A winter cattle drive photographed by Charles
Belden. (Library of Congress.)
41
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42
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43
Theodore Roosevelt on horseback in the Dakota
Territory in the 1880's, when he had moved west
to live as a cattle rancher. (Library of
Congress.)
44
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