Developing conceptual frameworks for effective school - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Developing conceptual frameworks for effective school PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 401da0-M2QxZ



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Developing conceptual frameworks for effective school

Description:

... and to enhance the professional skills of teachers How successful ... of effective leadership) ... Developing conceptual frameworks for effective ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:69
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 33
Provided by: Home1720
Learn more at: http://www.acsa.edu.au
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Developing conceptual frameworks for effective school


1
Developing conceptual frameworks for effective
school based planning and curriculum development
  • Jia Xu and Colin Marsh
  • Curtin University

2
  • Is it necessary and possible to have SBCD at
    schools in Australia?
  • Is it necessary and possible to use conceptual
    frameworks to help us understand and develop more
    effective SBCD?

3
SBCD in China
  • SBCD has been a highlight of Chinas new
    curriculum reform since 1999.
  • A curriculum policy change towards devolving
    partial power in curriculum decision-making to
    teachers.
  • 10 of curriculum is decided by local regions and
    individual schools.
  • Transforming teachers role from book-knowledge
    transmitters to curriculum developers.

4
Defining school-based curriculum development
(SBCD) as
  • a slogan,
  • a democratic philosophy,
  • a practical series of steps.

5
Caveats
  • SBCD is a constantly evolving term. It is very
    difficult to come up with a perfect form of SBCD.
  • Although it is a desirable process for teachers
    to become involved in SBCD yet the hard realities
    of systems and governments necessitate
    limitations.

6
What is a conceptual framework?
  • It provides a structure for curriculum planning.
  • It provides a coherent grouping of terms or
    values.
  • It provides ideal goals.

7
Some preliminary questions
  • Is school-based curriculum development alive and
    well in 2011 in Australia?
  • Is there a perfect type of school-based
    curriculum development and has it ever existed in
    a pure form?
  • Do ideas about school-based planning change over
    the decades, for better or worse?

8
Some different priorities of SBCD
  • A democratic vision to have more teacher
    involvement
  • A way of supplementing student resource materials
  • A way of addressing critical problems in an
    education system
  • A way to support systemic reforms and to enhance
    the professional skills of teachers

9
How successful are current efforts to do SBCD in
Asian countries ?
  • An example from Hong Kong
  • An example from Singapore

10
SBCD in action in Hong Kong
  • Innovative teachers are selected to be seed
    teachers and given special training at head
    office.
  • Creation of new promotional positions of
    curriculum leader in each primary school
  • Setting up of school-based support team in each
    education district
  • Celebration of exemplary efforts

11
SBCD in Singapore
  • Intensive workshops on SBCD provided for all
    primary schools
  • Research activists appointed for each school to
    support a specific SBCD project
  • Learning journeys to other schools locally
    overseas
  • Celebration of successes through public
    presentations/workshops

12
The Australian scene in 2011
  • Teaching has always been a complicated process.
  • Teachers need to be able to do a number of things
    almost simultaneously, including
  • unpacking knowledge and ideas,
  • making this accessible to others within a caring
    productive environment.

13
New pressures for teachers
  • New external pressures ongoing internal,
    school level pressures.
  • New external pressures
  • Australian Curriculum,
  • NAPLAN,
  • MY SCHOOL website,
  • Professional standards for teachers.
  • School-based planning and central planning
    working towards educational reform.

14
General problems for doing SBCD
  • Lack of time
  • Lack of expertise
  • Lack of finance
  • Externally imposed restrictions
  • Threatening school climate (resistors or lack of
    effective leadership) (Marsh,1992).

15
The arrival of the National Curriculum
  • Materials produced so far for the first four
    subjects indicate that what ACARA is requiring is
    more than just general principles and outcomes
    for each subject area.
  • There will be a major emphasis upon content and
    specifying of what is taught at each grade level.
  • This will be reinforced through NAPLAN results in
    terms of literacy and numeracy. This will flow
    over into other subjects.

16
Likely impacts
OR
17
Curriculum planning models
  • These models are typically general and apply
    across various subjects and teaching levels.
  • Models provide simple procedures for teachers to
    go about planning of lessons.
  • prescriptive models (Tyler, 1949 Taba, 1962).
  • Naturalistic Model (Walker, 1970).
  • Understanding by Design model (Wiggins McTighe,
    1998).

18
SBCD planning models
  • In situations where teachers want to get involved
    in school-based planning SBCD models need to be
    considered.
  • It is important to remember that each school
    situation is very different and so it makes the
    task of developing SBCD planning models all the
    more difficult.

19
Major categories of school-based models
20
Models that create typologies of different
variations of SBCD
Figure 1 Brady's matrix for analysis of SBCD in
practice (Brady, 1987)
21
Figure 1 Brady's matrix for analysis of SBCD in
practice (Brady, 1987)
22
Models that create typologies of different
variations of SBCD
Figure 2 A three-dimensional model of SBCD
(Marsh, 1990)
23
Figure 2 A three-dimensional model of SBCD
(Marsh, 1990)
24
Models that develop interlinked explanatory
factors
Figure 3 School-Based Curriculum Project Scheme,
Hong Kong (Lo, 1999)
25
Figure 3 School-Based Curriculum Project Scheme,
Hong Kong (Lo, 1999)
26
Models that develop interlinked explanatory
factors
Figure 4 Lees model of SBCD (2008)
27
Figure 4 Lees model of SBCD (2008)
28
Models that develop interlinked explanatory
factors
Figure 5 A model of implementing school-based
curriculum in a subject (Wong, 2008)
29
Figure 5 A model of implementing school-based
curriculum in a subject (Wong, 2008)
30
Models that develop interlinked explanatory
factors
Figure 6 A Conceptual Model of SBCD (Marsh, 2009)
31
Figure 6 A Conceptual Model of SBCD (Marsh, 2009)
32
Concluding comment
  • Making curriculum space available for SBCD is a
    major issue and it depends upon levels of
    cooperation between centralised and decentralised
    forms of curriculum development.
  • There are a variety of SBCD approaches. The
    conceptual models outlined here provide just some
    of the possibilities.
  • Because SBCD is closely related to local needs
    and priorities it is not possible to come up with
    one conceptual model which fits all.
About PowerShow.com