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Material Handling

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Personnel who are not trained to handle HAZWOPER situations are to follow the direction of their supervisor regarding their responsibility on site. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Material Handling


1
Material Handling
2
Material Handling
  • Material handling equipment all equipment that
    relates to the movement, storage, control and
    protection of materials, goods and products.
  • Man lifts
  • Forklifts
  • Bulk material handlers

3
Material Handling
  • Before using any type of equipment it is required
    that you be trained on that type of equipment.
  • A pre-operation inspection shall also be
    conducted before starting the equipment.

4
Material Handling
  • Pre-Operation Inspection items
  • Fluids
  • Leaks or cracks in hoses and mast chains
  • Tire condition
  • Load backrest extension

5
Material Handling
  • Pre-Operation Inspection items
  • Finger guards
  • Decals and nameplates (must be legible)
  • Operator manual (must be legible)
  • Seat belt

6
Material Handling
  • Operational Inspection
  • (with engine running)
  • Accelerator linkage
  • Inch control (if equipped)
  • Brakes
  • Steering
  • Drive tilt controls
  • Horns, lights, backup alarm, and hour meter

7
Material Handling
  • Any powered industrial truck not in safe
    operating condition shall be removed from
    service. All repairs shall be made by authorized
    personnel.
  • (29 CFR 1910.178 (q)(1))
  • Defects when found must be immediately reported
    and corrected.
  • (29 CFR 1910.178 (q)(1))

8
Material Handling
  • Scheduled maintenance is critical to the safe
    operation of your vehicle.
  • Never operate a piece of equipment requiring
    maintenance.

9
Material Handling
  • Cranes A lifting machine, generally equipped
    with a winder or wire rope drum, wire ropes or
    chains and sheaves that can be used to lift and
    lower materials and to move horizontally.

10
Material Handling
  • Types of cranes
  • Truck mounted
  • Side-lift
  • Rough terrain
  • All terrain
  • Crawler crane

11
Material Handling
  • Rigging The equipment and method used in
    lifting, pulling, or tying down an object.
  • Always make sure to use the proper chain grade
    specifically for rigging.

12
Material Handling
  • Tag Lines Lines to keep you out of the line of
    fire.

13
Material Handling
  • Cheater Bar / Pipe
  • An improvised breaker bar made from pipe and a
    wrench.
  • Used to free items that are hard to remove with a
    ratchet or wrench alone or to operate valves.

14
Material Handling
  • Problems in using cheater bar/pipe
  • If the component frees suddenly the worker can
    become a projectile that is propelled.
  • The cheater bar itself can become part of a
    catapult with the worker in the line of fire.
  • Use of such items can damage the component.
  • Falls, impacts, punctures and other injuries can
    occur from improper use.

15
Material Handling
  • Back Injury Prevention
  • The back is critical in daily operations. It is
    used in every aspect of life.
  • After suffering one back injury, you are much
    more likely to experience another one later on.
  • More than 1 million workers suffer back injuries
    each year, accounting for 1/5 of all workplace
    injuries or illnesses.

16
Material Handling
  • Why back injuries occur
  • Poor physical condition
  • Poor posture
  • Extra weight
  • Stress
  • Heavy lifting
  • Twisting at the waist while lifting
  • Lifting, carrying or working in odd positions
  • Sitting or standing too long in one position

17
Material Handling
  • If lifted correctly it takes 10 lbs. of pressure
    to lift a 10 lb. object.
  • When you add in the 105 lbs. of an average
    humans upper torso, lifting a 10 lb. object puts
    1,150 lbs. of pressure on the human back.

18
Material Handling
  • Alternatives to Lifting
  • Use cranes, hoists and lift tables
  • Place objects up off the floor or ground
  • Raise/lower work surfaces when possible
  • Use carts and dollies to move objects
  • Get a partner to help you lift
  • Reduce the amount of weight lifted

19
Material Handling
  • Proper Lifting Techniques
  • Bend your knees
  • Take a balanced stance
  • Squat down to lift, keeping your heels off the
    floor.

20
Material Handling
  • Proper Lifting Techniques
  • Get a firm grip on the load.
  • Lift gradually keeping the load close to your
    body.
  • Change directions by pointing your feet in the
    direction you want to go.

21
Material Handling
  • Proper Lifting Techniques
  • Avoid twisting at your waist while carrying a
    load.
  • When you put a load down, use these same
    guidelines in reverse.

22
Review
23
Walking-Working Surfaces
24
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • Slips, trips and falls can happen in any part of
    the workplace, inside or outdoors.
  • Slips and trips often result in falls and more
    serious outcomes, including disabling injuries
    and even death.
  • The cost to both worker and
  • employer can be great.

25
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • Contributing factors
  • Poor housekeeping
  • Poor guarding of hazards
  • Lack of general knowledge

26
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • It is important to remember that fall protection
    must be worn at OSHAs required heights.
  • The fall protection used will depend on the job.
  • Full body harness and lanyards are examples.
  • Fall protection training will be provided for
    those employees required to use it.

27
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • General Requirements
  • Employees must be extremely cautious when working
    near and around
  • Floor and wall openings
  • Stairways
  • Platforms
  • Ladders and scaffolds
  • All elevated work areas

28
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • General Requirements
  • Always use handrails.
  • Avoid ascending and descending any climbing
    surface with awkward loads or without handrails.

29
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • General Requirements
  • Always have adequate lighting.
  • Always wear fall protection when required.

30
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • Dropped Objects
  • Provide Adequate Warning
  • If you are going to do work overhead warn those
    in the area
  • Verbally
  • With signs
  • Ropes
  • Barricades

31
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • Dropped Objects
  • Secure the Load
  • Make sure the load is balanced.
  • Use restraints such as nylon strapping bands to
    secure overhead objects.
  • Ensure guard rails and toe boards are in place on
    scaffolds or platforms.

32
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • Dropped Objects
  • Guarding
  • Cover all floor openings, wall openings and holes
    to prevent tripping, falling or loss of tools.
  • Every open-sided floor or platform 4 feet or more
    above the adjacent floor or ground must be
    guarded.

33
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • Guarding
  • Do not use barricade tape or flagging as a
    temporary railing or fall restraint.
  • Never leave a floor opening unprotected.
  • Covers and/or guardrails must be provided to
    protect employees from hazards.
  • While the cover is not in place, the opening must
    be constantly attended.

34
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • When we are talking about holes and openings, the
    following criteria is used
  • Floor Hole opening less than 12 inches but more
    than 1 inch.
  • Floor Opening Opening larger than 12 inches.

35
Walking-Working Surfaces
Housekeeping
DO
  • Keep aisles, walkways, stairways and escape
    routes free of clutter.
  • Clean up spills immediately.
  • Prevent oil accumulation on floors.
  • Pick up trash.
  • Return tools and parts to their proper areas.
  • Keep tools and materials away from edges of
    platform.
  • Stack tools on a flat surfaces cross-tie them or
    cover them to keep in place.

36
Walking-Working Surfaces
Housekeeping
DONT
  • Leave spills for someone else to clean up.
  • Allow oil to build up on surfaces.
  • Allow trash to collect in corners, under
    machinery or other out of the way places.
  • Assume someone else sees the hazard.
  • Lay tools and other materials close to edges, on
    railings or sills.

37
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • Scaffold
  • If you suspect a scaffold is not safe, contact
    your supervisor before beginning work.
  • Scaffold must be inspected and have a tag in
    place tag is good for 60 days.
  • Scaffolds over 4 feet must have railing to
    protect workers.

38
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • Scaffold cont.
  • Scaffolds over 6 feet must have toe boards and
    bracing.
  • Employees shall not work on scaffolds during
    storms and high winds.
  • Slippery conditions, including ice and snow must
    be eliminated as soon as possible after they
    occur.

39
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • Ladders
  • The main hazard when using a ladder is falling.
  • Ladders must be inspected before each use.
  • Any ladder found to have defects must be repaired
    or tagged for destruction.

40
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • Ladders cont.
  • Maintain ladders in good condition at all times.
  • Ladders used to gain access to roofs must extend
    no less than 3 feet from the point of support.
  • Do not use make-shift ladders.

41
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • Ladders cont.
  • Never use a ladder in the horizontal position as
    a work platform.
  • Do not leave ladder unattended.
  • Do not use ladders in front of unlocked,
    unguarded doors or in high traffic areas.
  • Always face a ladder when climbing up or down.

42
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • Ladders cont.
  • Carry tools in a tool belt.
  • Keep your body centered on the
  • ladder use the belt buckle rule.
  • Do not use metal ladders near electrical
    equipment.
  • One person at a time on a ladder unless
    specifically designed for more.

43
Walking-Working Surfaces
  • Ladders cont.
  • Keep ladders free and clean from grease.
  • Never use a defective ladder.
  • Portable ladders must have non-slip feet.
  • Maintain a 4 to 1 ratio for the angle of the
    ladder.

44
Review
45
Occupational Health
46
Occupational Health
  • Occupational health hazards are a part of working
    in our industry.
  • Through training, knowledge and an understanding
    of the hazards, we can work safely in these
    environments.

47
Occupational Health- Lead
  • Lead is a poisonous, bluish white, metallic
    element use mostly in combination with other
    materials.
  • Pipes, cable sheaths, batteries, bullets, paint,
    gasoline and solder.
  • In certain doses, lead can be a toxic substance
    when absorbed into your body.

48
Occupational Health- Lead
  • Typical work activities which may generate lead
    exposure
  • Welding
  • Buffing
  • Grinding
  • Torch cutting
  • Sand blasting on coated surfaces

49
Occupational Health- Lead
  • Lead can enter the body through inhalation or
    ingestion.
  • Symptoms of over-exposure
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue
  • Anemia
  • Irritability
  • Muscle and joint pain
  • Stomach cramps

50
Occupational Health- Benzene
  • Benzene is an aromatic hydrocarbon that occurs
    naturally in petroleum crude oils and natural gas
    condensates.
  • Benzene concentrations are usually greater in
    lighter crude oils and condensates.
  • Under normal operating conditions, benzene should
    not be present in hazardous airborne
    concentrations.

51
Occupational Health- Benzene
  • Acute health effects
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Respiratory irritation
  • Chronic health effects
  • Cancer of the blood forming organs (leukemia).

52
Occupational Health- Benzene
  • Benzene can be detected by
  • Odor aromatic, slightly sweet odor.
  • Physical symptoms acute and chronic health
    effects.
  • Gas monitor fixed monitor or personal.
  • If you suspect a benzene spill or leak,
    vacate the area immediately and notify
    the appropriate personnel.

53
Occupational Health- Carbon Dioxide
  • Carbon Dioxide gas is formed from the combination
    of two elements carbon and oxygen.
  • It is produced from the fermentation of liquids
    and breathing by humans and animals.
  • It cannot sustain life.

54
Occupational Health- Naturally Occurring
Radioactive Materials (NORM)
  • NORM is a broad group of radioactive substances
    found naturally in our environment.
  • Crude oil, natural gas, and other substances
    extracted from the ground may be found to possess
    measurable levels of radioactivity.
  • Exposure occurs when the radioactive materials
    become airborne.

55
Occupational Health- NORM
  • The primary hazard is not the exposure to NORM
    but when these materials are taken into the body
    through
  • Breathing
  • Eating
  • Open cuts and wounds

56
Occupational Health-Fibers (Man-made Asbestos)
  • 29 CFR 1910.1001 indicates that all affected
    personnel shall be trained in a way to ensure the
    employees understanding.
  • Asbestos is mainly used in fiber form.
  • Employees will be taught how to use respiratory
    protection if working in exposure areas.

57
Occupational Health-Fibers (Man-made Asbestos)
  • A medical surveillance program will be activated
    if exposure to airborne concentrations of fibers
    or asbestos are at or above the action level
    and/or excursion limit.
  • Examinations will be performed by a licensed
    physician and shall include a medical work
    history and complete physical exam of all
    systems.

58
Occupational Health-Fibers (Man-made Asbestos)
  • Air samples will be taken in the breathing zone
    where action level and/or excursion limits are
    reached.

59
Occupational Health-Organic Solvents
  • Solvents are substances that are capable of
    dissolving or dispersing one or more other
    substances.
  • Many organic solvents are recognized by NIOSH as
    carcinogens (benzene, carbon tetrachloride,
    trichloroethylene).

60
Occupational Health-Organic Solvents
  • Some examples and their uses
  • Methane Industrial settings.
  • Toluene Paint, fuel oil, cleaning agents,
    lacquers, and paint thinners.
  • 1,1,1 Trichloroethane (methyl chloroform)
    Degreaser and propellant.

61
Occupational Health-Organic Solvents
  • Avoid breathing in vapors
  • Ventilate the area well.
  • Wear rubber gloves when using solvents.
  • Wash solvents from skin immediately after use.

62
Occupational Health-Mercury and Diethanolamine
  • Mercury
  • Found in wastewater from oil and gas production.
  • Mercury can enter the body through the lungs,
    skin and through the digestive system.
  • Diethanolamine
  • Purifies gases, particularly natural gas.
  • Clear, colorless or pale yellow liquid.

63
Occupational Health-Hexavalent Chromium
  • Yellowish-green liquid.
  • Recognized as a human carcinogen.
  • Problematic among workers who handle chromate
    products and those who arc weld stainless steel.

64
Occupational Health-Methanol
  • Most commonly produced from the methane component
    in natural gas.
  • Volatile
  • Colorless
  • Highly flammable
  • Distinct odor slightly sweeter than ethanol
  • Burns with a clear flame

65
Occupational Health-Nitrogen Gas (N2)
  • Effective alternative used to frac shallow
  • wells.
  • Normally colorless
  • Odorless
  • Tasteless
  • Non-metal gas

66
Occupational Health-Insect Bites
  • Stings and bites from insets are common, usually
    resulting in redness and swelling of the area.
  • Occasionally a sting can cause a life threatening
    reaction if you are allergic to the insect or are
    bitten multiple times.

67
Occupational Health-Insect Bites
  • Symptoms may include
  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Redness
  • Itching
  • Anaphylaxis

68
Occupational Health-Insect Bites
  • You can minimize your exposure to insect bites by
    changing your patterns of activity or behavior.
  • Avoid outdoor activity during dawn and dusk
    periods if possible.
  • Wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants and hats.
  • Use insect repellants apply to clothing, shoes
    and other gear.

69
Occupational Health-Insect Bites
  • Anaphylaxis
  • A severe reaction beyond the immediate area of a
    sting if you are allergic.
  • Symptoms may include
  • Hives
  • Wheezing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Unconsciousness
  • Possible death

70
Occupational Health-Staph
  • Staph symptoms may vary depending on the location
    and severity of the infection.
  • Skin infections may be passed from one family
    member to another. It is important to not share
    clothing, towels or other similar items.
  • Staph can survive
  • Drying
  • Temperature extremes
  • High levels of salt

71
Occupational Health-Staph
  • Prevention
  • Wash your hands
  • Keep wounds covered
  • Keep personal items personal
  • Do your part to keep YOU healthy.

72
Review
73
Environmental Awareness
74
Environmental Awareness
  • The primary goal of the well site owner, well
    owner/operator, and well service contractors is
    to provide a safe and clean work site.
  • An environmentally safe work site relates to
    proper containment of solid, liquid and gaseous
    hazardous materials.
  • Failure to contain hazardous materials may expose
    the company and its employees to serious civil
    and criminal penalties, as well as adverse
    publicity.

75
Environmental Awareness
  • Federal regulation requires discharges in
    quantities that may be harmful to public health
    or the environment be reported immediately.
  • Each state can then mandate more stringent
    guidelines if desired.

76
Environmental Awareness
  • Practicing all designated procedures and rules
    will insure compliance with all environmental
    laws and regulations.
  • All employees are to be aware of their
    responsibility to maintain a safe environment as
    a condition of employment.

77
Environmental Awareness
  • HAZWOPER Incidents
  • A HAZWOPER situation may occur when an
    uncontrolled amount of gas or oil flows from a
    well bore and is not contained on the well site
    or,
  • A fire presents an explosive hazard or when gas
    is released which requires special attention by
    specially trained personnel.

78
Environmental Awareness
  • The company supervisor will arrange for HAZWOPER
    trained personnel to handle a specific situation.
  • Personnel who are not trained to handle HAZWOPER
    situations are to follow the direction of their
    supervisor regarding their responsibility on
    site.

79
Environmental Awareness
  • Environmental Safety Procedure
  • Signs are to be posted designating hazardous and
    flammable materials.
  • Valves and discharge devices are to be quick,
    self-closing when placed on containers.
  • All waste materials must go in specific
    containers meant to hold that type of waste.

80
Environmental Awareness
  • Only approved containers are to be used to store
    hazardous materials or flammable liquids.
  • All tanks, containers, and vessels are to be
    marked to indicated contents.

81
Environmental Awareness
  • Used cleaning rags and combustible waste are to
    be stored outside in a metal container and kept
    to a minimum.
  • Rig floors and well cellars are to be kept free
    from water, oils, and other contaminated waste.

82
Environmental Awareness
  • All spills of hazardous materials are to be
    cleaned up immediately, if the employee is
    trained or authorized.
  • Proper personal protective equipment is to be
    used when handling hazardous waste.

83
Environmental Awareness
  • All lines connecting tank trucks, vessels and
    pumping equipment to the well head or other
    storage containers are to be equipped with a
    check valve.
  • Cease operation immediately if a rupture or leak
    occurs.

84
Environmental Awareness
  • Catch pans should be used when running rods or
    tubing to prevent oil spill onto the well site.
  • Minimize waste to reduce the amount of hazardous
    material that permanently leaves the production
    process as waste.

85
Environmental Awareness
  • The rig site is to be kept clean of all trash
    during the period you are on the well location.

86
Review
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