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What Does it Take to Get Youth Involved in Activities? A Pattern-Centered Approach to Youth, Family, and Community Predictors

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What Does it Take to Get Youth Involved in Activities? A Pattern-Centered Approach to Youth, Family, and Community Predictors Nicole Zarrett Tufts University – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: What Does it Take to Get Youth Involved in Activities? A Pattern-Centered Approach to Youth, Family, and Community Predictors


1
What Does it Take to Get Youth Involved in
Activities? A Pattern-Centered Approach to
Youth, Family, and Community Predictors
  • Nicole Zarrett
  • Tufts University
  • Stephen C. Peck and Jacquelynne S. Eccles
  • University of Michigan

2
Acknowledgements
  • We thank the following people for their support
    of this project (listed alphabetically) Elaine
    Belansky, Todd Bartko, Heather Bouchey, Nick
    Butler, Celina Chatman, Diane Early, Kari Fraser,
    Leslie Gutman, Katie Jodl, Ariel Kalil, Linda
    Kuhn, Sarah Lord, Karen McCarthy, Oksana
    Malanchuk, Alice Michael, Melanie Overby, Stephen
    C. Peck, Robert Roeser, Sherri Steele, Erika
    Taylor, Janice Templeton, Cindy Winston, and
    Carol Wong.
  • Data reported here come from grants to
    Jacquelynne S. Eccles and Arnold J. Sameroff from
    the MacArthur Network on Successful Adolescent
    Development in High Risk Settings (Chair R.
    Jessor), the National Institutes for Child Health
    and Human Development, and to Jacquelynne S.
    Eccles from the W.T. Grant Foundation.

3
Dynamic SystemsPerson Environment Fit
Optimal Functioning
Environmental Opportunities
Personal Needs
f
4
Holistic Interactionism (Magnusson, et al., 2001)
Example Activity Choice
5
Basic Expectancy Value Model (Eccles, 1993)
Sport Expectancies

Music Expectancies
ACTIVITY CHOICE
_

Sport Values
_
Music Values
6
Analyses
  • Activity Participation Patterns
  • Cluster analysis using Sleipner 2.0 Package for
  • 7th, 9th, and 11th grade activity participation
    patterns
  • Adolescent Motivational Profile
  • Parent Socialization Patterns (behaviors and
    beliefs)
  • Community Resource Profiles
  • Participation Continuity
  • Beginning in the 7th/9th and continuing through
    Grade 11
  • Comparisons
  • Univariate Analyses with Planned Contrasts
  • Identifying over-representation
  • Cross-tabs (ChiSquare analyses)

7
Maryland Adolescent Development in Context Study
(MADICS) (PIs J. Eccles and A. Sameroff)
  • A community-based longitudinal study
  • 7th, 9th, and 11th grades, 1 and 3 yrs post H.S.
  • 1,482 adolescents and their families
  • 49 female
  • 61 African American, 35 White
  • Pretax family income in 1990
  • Mean 42,500-52,500 / Range 5, 000-75,000
  • Income normatively distributed among both African
    Americans and Whites.

8
MeasuresYouth Activities
  • Constructive Activities
  • Sports, School-related, Community, Volunteer and
    Religious activities.
  • Reading, Homework, Work, Chores and playing a
    Musical Instrument.
  • Passive Activities
  • Hanging out with Friends and Watching Television

Activities were measured on a scale of 1 thru
5 (1little to no involvement in the activity
5participate daily)
9
Measures continued
  • Youth Motivation Profiles
  • Self-concepts of Ability in and Value of
  • Academics, Sports, Music/Arts, Social
  • School Engagement, Self-Esteem, Alcohol Use
  • Parent Socialization Patterns
  • Expectancy-Value of Youth in
  • Academics, Sports, Music/Arts
  • Encouragement/Frustration with the Youth in the
    Activity
  • Own Activity Involvement
  • Time Spent with Youth
  • Community Profiles
  • Neighborhood Problems
  • Neighborhood Resources
  • Neighborhood Social Support (collective efficacy)
  • School Quality

10
Activity Participation Patterns

11
Youth Motivation Profile
12
Parent Socialization Patterns
13
Community Support Profile
14
Developmental Outcomes
  • Low-Engagement Negative
  • Participation in Activities Positive
  • Sports Participation Mixed

15
Under the Microscope
  • SPORT-ONLY vs. SPORTACTIVITIES
  • 11th Grade Means by Continuous Activity
    Participation Patterns

16
Predictors of Participation
  • Community Family Youth
  • SportActivity

17
SOCIAL ECOLOGICAL MODEL
COMMUNITY
FAMILY
PARENT
CHILD
SCHOOL
PEERS
18
Nested Contextual Systems
Community
Family
Youth
Youth Participation
19
Highlights
  • ONE Youth Profile predictive of participation in
    the SportActivities pattern
  • Across race, gender, and SES

20
Youth Profile
21
Highlights continued
  • THREE Parent socialization patterns

22
Parent Socialization
23
Highlights continued
  • TWO Community Profiles

24
Community
25
  • Distal factors
  • availability of resources and sense of safety in
    neighborhoods and schools
  • Proximal
  • Parent
  • Peer
  • Individual

26
Conclusions and Future Directions
  • Equifinal and Multifinal development
  • Dropping out of Activities
  • Supports for a Diversity of Youth

27
Conceptual Model
7th Grade
9th Grade
11th Grade
Y
F
Y
F
Y
F
A
A
A
C
C
C
A
Outcome
Outcome
Outcome
28
  • Thank you.
  • For more information
  • nicole.zarrett_at_tufts.edu
  • OR
  • www.rcgd.isr.umich.edu/garp/
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