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Transformer Technology

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Hot Work Permit Presentation University of Colorado at Boulder * * Basic Fire Alarm Design -- 2/02 * * Basic Fire Alarm Design -- 2/02 * * Basic Fire Alarm Design ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Transformer Technology


1
Hot Work Permit Presentation University of
Colorado at Boulder

2
Protect People, Property and Continuity of
Building Operations
Fire Safety Objectives

Prevent Fire Ignition
Manage Fire Impact

3
Topics Covered
  • I. Permits and Certificates
  • II.   Typical List of Hot Works
  • III.  HWP Objectives
  • IV. Code Requirements
  • V. General Hot Work Issues/Guidelines
  • VI.  Examples of Fires Caused by Hot Work
  • VII. Quiz

4
I. Hot Work Permits (HWP) and
Hot Work Certificates (HWC)
  • PERMITS
  • HWPs Are Issued to All Project Contractors,
    e.g., Hired by Projects, and to Contractors Hired
    for Non-Emergency Projects by Shops. HWPs are
    Generally Valid for One Shift.  Project
    Contractors Apply for the HWP Using Directions
    Given on the HWP Form.

5
Hot Work Permits (HWP) and Hot Work Certificates
(HWC) (Continued)
  • CERTIFICATES
  • HWCs Are Issued to Shops Encompassing Trained
    Shop Personnel. HWCs are Issued Annually with
    Individual Task Authorization by the Shop
    Supervisor. Campus Personnel Attend HWP
    Training. Shops Will Have an Annual Certificate.
    The Shop Supervisor Authorizes Daily Activities.
    Contractors Hired During Emergencies by FM
    Shops The Shop Supervisor or His/Her Designee
    Will Authorizes Activities.

6
II. Typical List of Hot Works 
  • DEFINITION
  • Hot Work Is Any Temporary Operation
    Involving Open Flames or Producing Heat or Spark
    Including the Following
  • 1.   Welding
  • 2.   Heat Treating
  • 3.   Grinding
  • 4.   Thawing Pipe
  • 5.   Hot Riveting
  • 6.   Soldering and Brazing
  • 7.   Powder-driven Fasteners
  • 8. Torch Applied Roofing
  • 9. Similar Activities Involving Spark,
    Flame, or Heat

7
The Objectives of a HWP Include
  • 1. To prevent loss of life and property from fire
    and explosion as a result of hot work,
  • 2. To ensure that the work is authorized by
    responsible personnel including FLS, FSG, EHS,
    Shop Supervisors and Project Managers as
    Clarified Later,
  • 3. To ensure that hazards are identified and
    removed/isolated, protected or disconnected,
  • 4. To ensure that the operator is trained to
    perform the work safely,
  • 5. To ensure that appropriate equipment is used,

8
The Objectives of HWP (Continued)
  • 6.   To ensure that appropriate fire
    extinguishing equipment is on hand,
  • 7.   To prevent nuisance fire alarms,
  • 8.   To assist project administrators implement
    the requirements of HWP codes and
  • 9. The HWP posted at the job site will help
    building occupants/proctors know that the work is
    authorized.

9
IV. Code Requirements
  • 1. NFPA 51B, Standard for Fire Prevention
    During Welding, Cutting, and Other Hot Work,
    Current Edition.
  • 2. Chapter 26 of the 2009 Edition of the
    International Fire Code (IFC).

10
Code Requirements (Continued)
  • The codes address applicable issues including
  • A.   Fire Watch
  • B.   Pre Hot Work Check
  • C.   Prevention Procedures
  • D.   Fire Extinguishers
  • E. Post Hot Work Check
  • NOTES
  • 1. When Making Decisions on Requirements, Be
    Conservative. For Example, If a Container
    Containing Unknown Chemicals is nearby, Assume it
    Contains Flammables. Likewise, If There Are
    Holes Through Floors or Walls, Assume That There
    Are Concealed Combustibles Not Visible From the
    Work Side.
  • 2. See Handout Containing the HWP Form and a
    Summary of Requirements and Study the Code Copies
    Provided to Your Shop.

11
V. General Hot Work Issues/Guidelines
  • 1. Hot Work Permit Is Just a Tool. Using it
    Incorrectly Will Destroy the Process of
    Controlling Hot Work.
  • 2. Your First Consideration Should Be to
    Choose Another Alternative to Hot Work, e.g.,
    Hand Filing Instead of Grinding.
  • 3. Hot Work Should Be the Last Resort.
  • 4. Project Administrators and Shops Are to
    Enforce the Hot Work Permit System. Supervise All
    Who Perform Hot Work.
  • 5. Effective Hot Work Loss Prevention Starts
    with Management and Employees Dedication to
    Total Prevention.

12
General HW Issues/Guidelines (Continued)
  • 6. Enforce the 35-Foot Rule Alternatively,
    Provide Hot Work/Spark Barriers. Within the
    Area
  • A. Sweep Floors Clean. Remove Grease and Oils,
    Do Not Simply Soak Liquid With Sawdust. Remove
    Lint From Machinery.
  • B. Cover Combustible Floors.
  • C. Suspend Fire Resistive Tarpaulins Under Hot
    Work Conducted Near the Ceiling.
  • D. Place Non-Combustible Screens Around Hot
    Work Conducted at Floor to Trap Sparks.
  • E. Move Nearby Combustibles. Protect
    Combustibles that Cannot Be Moved With
    Tarpaulins or Shields.
  • F. Halt Any Process That Produces an Explosive
    Atmosphere and Continuously Monitor the Area
    for Such Conditions.

13
General HW Issues/Guidelines (Continued)
  • G. Apply a Hot Work Control Process to Less
    Obvious Temporary Ignition Sources in Special
    Hazard Areas, e.g., Electrical Tools and Cell
    Phones in Hazardous Locations.
  • H. Cover All Wall and Floor Openings. Plug
    Holes With Listed Firestop Material.
  • I. Seal Ductwork and Duct Openings with Metal
    Covers or Fire Resistive Tarpaulins.
  • J. Close All Doors and Fire Doors.

14
VI. Examples of Fires Caused by Hot Work
  • 1. 1953 General Motors Livonia Fire (300
    Million Dollars in 2002)
  • 2. 1999 Hong Kong Hotel Fire
  • NOTES
  • a. Hot Work Fires Are Among the Top Causes of
    Losses at Properties Insured by Major U.S.
    Insurance Companies.
  • b. Hot Work Fires Link Directly to Lack of
    Supervision.
  • c. All Hot Work Fires Can Be Prevented by
    Paying Attention and Following the Procedures
    and by Using Common Sense.

15
VII. Hot Work Permit Fire-Safety Quiz
  • 1. What constitutes the branches of fire-safety?
  • a. Fire prevention
  • b. Fire protection/ preparedness
  • c. Both a and b
  • d. None of the above
  •  

16
2. Keeping flammables and combustibles away from
a soldering area is consistent with which of the
following
  • a. Fire detection
  • b. Ignition prevention
  • c. Fire suppression
  • d. None of the above

17
3. In general, the most important fire-safety
objective is
  • a. Protection of room contents and operations
  • b. Prevention of water damage
  • c. Protection of people
  • d. None of the above  

18
4. Is a Hot Work Permit required for using a
BBQ grill?
  • a. Yes
  • b. No

19
5. For daily campus shop activities, which one of
the following statements is correct?
  • a. A daily HWP is required.
  • b. An annual HWP/certificate is required.
  • c. An annual HWP/certificate is required and the
    shop supervisors authorization for the daily
    work.

20
6. Which one of the following activities is Hot
Work?
  • a.   Grinding
  • b.   Thawing Pipe
  • c.   Hot Riveting
  • d.   Powder-driven Fasteners
  • d.   All of the above

21
7. Who is responsible to ensure that contractors
hired for emergencies (e.g., by shops) follow Hot
Work Permit requirements and procedures?
  • a.   Project Administrator
  • b.   The Building Proctor
  • c.   The Shop Supervisor Who Hired the Contractor
  • d.   None of the above

22
8. Who is responsible to ensure that contractors
follow Hot Work Permit requirements and
procedures?
  • a.   The Project Administrator
  • b.   The Shop Supervisor
  • c.   The Building Proctor
  • d.   a or b as Applicable

23
9. What Should Your First Consideration Be Prior
to Starting Hot Work?
  • a.  Call the Shop Supervisor
  • b. Contact the Fire Systems Group to Determine
    Detectors in the Area
  • c.  Rest and Concentrate
  • d.  Determine Whether There Is an Alternative to
    Hot Work, e.g., Hand Filing Vs. Grinding.
  • e. All of the Above

24
10. Explain the 35-Foot Rule.
  • Clear a 35-ft Surface Area Around the Hot
    Work Area. Remove All Combustibles Within the
    Radius of That Area.

25
11. Which of the Following Is an Important Hot
Work Precaution?
  • a. Sweep Floors Clean. Remove Grease and Oils,
    Do Not Simply Soak Liquid With Sawdust. Remove
    Lint From Machinery. Cover Combustible Floors.
  • b. Suspend Fire Resistive Tarpaulins Under Hot
    Work Conducted Near the Ceiling. Place
    Non-Combustible Screens Around Hot Work Conducted
    at Floor to Trap Sparks.
  • c. Move Nearby Combustibles. Protect
    Combustibles that Cannot Be Moved With Tarpaulins
    or Shields.
  • d. Cover All Wall and Floor Openings. Plug
    Holes With Listed Firestop Material. Seal
    Ductwork and Duct Openings with Metal Covers or
    Fire Resistive Tarpaulins.
  • e. All of the Above.

26
  • Thank you!
  • For More Information Please Visit the FLS Web
    Page
  • http//fm.colorado.edu/firesafety/
  • Questions?
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