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Getting to grips with learning intentions and success criteria An online workshop With thanks to TEAM Solutions AtoL team

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Title: Getting to grips with learning intentions and success criteria An online workshop With thanks to TEAM Solutions AtoL team


1
Getting to grips with learning intentions and
success criteria An online workshop With
thanks to TEAM Solutions AtoL team
2

Who will find this workshop useful?
  • Teachers
  • Syndicates / departments
  • Assess to Learn (AtoL) facilitators

How to use this workshop
  • To update, review and/or reflect on formative
    assessment practice.
  • As a focus for professional development in
    exploring assessment for learning.
  • To support AtoL programmes in schools.

3
The learning intention for this workshop
  • Learning intention
  • To learn to construct learning intentions and
    success criteria.
  • Success criteria
  • I can
  • identify open and closed learning intentions
  • separate learning intentions from their context
  • construct learning intentions and success
    criteria in my own subject area

4
Why use learning intentions?
Using learning intentions helps students develop
a picture of what is expected of them from the
learning. Many pupils do not have such a
picture and appear to have become accustomed to
receiving classroom teaching as an arbitrary
sequence of exercises with no overarching
rationale When pupils do acquire such overview,
they then become more committed and more
effective as learners their own assessments
become an object of discussion with their
teachers and with one another
Black William
(1998) P10
5
Clarifying terms
  • All these terms mean the same thing
  • Learning intentions
  • Learning outcomes
  • Learning objectives

6
Learning Intentions defined
  • What are we going to learn?
  • Learning intentions may be written like this
  • We are learning to
  • To be able to
  • To understand / explain / discuss etc
  • Today we will be able to

7
Separating the learning intention from the context
  • If learning intentions are not written clearly
    the result may be
  • a mismatch of lesson focus with activities
  • an inappropriate focus
  • awkward success criteria that dont fit the
    learning.
  • By separating the learning intention from the
    context students can apply the skill or concept
    in a number of different contexts.
  • It is also much easier to write success criteria
    for de-contextualised learning intentions.

8
Examples of learning intentions with and without
the context (Clarke, 2005)
Learning intention with context Learning intention without context Context or activity
To present an argument for and against vegetarianism To present an argument including for and against positions Vegetarianism
To produce a questionnaire about shopping patterns To be able to investigate the distribution of an economic activity Interviews with family about where they shop and how their shopping patterns have changed
To order numbers to 10 To order written numbers Numbers to at least 10 using number cards
Clarke, S. (2005). Formative Assessment in
Action weaving the elements together.
9
Learning Intentions what students thought they
were learning (Clarke 2005)
Learning intention with context What students thought they were learning Learning intention without context What students thought they were learning now
To write instructions to make a sandwich I would learn how to make a sandwich. To write instructions (A sandwich) We would be learning to write instructions.
To know why Samuel Pepys is important in understanding the events of the Great Fire of London We would be learning about what happened and what he wrote. We would also learn how to put a fire out To know how primary sources help us to find out about the past (Great fire of London, Samuel Pepys) We would learn to find out about how other people lived.
From Clarke, S. (2005). Formative Assessment in
Action weaving the elements together.
10
Concept and knowledge learning objectives
  • Concepts are the big ideas that are explored over
    time. They need to be broken down when writing
    learning intentions so that learners can see how
    the days learning relates to the overall
    learning intention.
  • Learning intention
  • To understand the importance of a healthy diet.
  • The long-term over-arching concept
  • To understand the importance of a healthy diet.
  • Its broken down version for today
  • To understand the impact of protein.
  • The process involved
  • To use information retrieval skills.

11
Success criteria why are they important?
  • How do we know we have met the learning
    intention?
  • When success criteria are used
  • the learning becomes more explicit
  • students can confirm, consolidate and integrate
    new knowledge
  • future learning is scaffolded
  • students can see what quality looks like.

12
Types of learning intention and success criteria
  • Not all learning is the same so not all learning
    intentions and success criteria are the same.
    There are
  • Closed skills teaching of skills, concepts,
    knowledge
  • Open skills application of skills, concepts,
    knowledge

13
Closed skills
Closed skills are either right or wrong. Success
criteria for closed skills are either the steps
involved or what you need to remember to achieve
the learning objective.
  • Learning intention
  • To share a quantity into a ratio.
  • Success criteria
  • I can
  • add the parts e.g. 23 2 35
  • write each ratio as a fraction 2/5 3/5
  • multiply each fraction by the whole e.g. 2/5 of
    20.

14
Open skills
Open skills are neither right nor wrong. Lesson
objectives need examples and discussion about
quality.
  • Learning intention
  • To understand and explain the use of musical
    instruments and elements in programmatic music.
  • Success criteria
  • I can
  • create a balanced 3-section composition
  • use tone, pitch and dynamics to reflect the
    events and mood of the story
  • use instruments creatively.
  • The success criteria provide a menu of devices
    that will help to produce quality work, where not
    all need to be included.

15
An example using Languages (Te Reo)
  • Achievement objective (concept)
  • To communicate, including comparing and
    contrasting habits and routines.
  • Learning intentions (developed from concept)
  • I can
  • communicate about daily routines (context
    school day)
  • compare my daily routine with that of someone
    else
  • contrast routines with what I like to do in my
    free time.
  • Each of these may be broken down further

16
  • Learning intention
  • To communicate about daily routines (context
    school day).
  • Success criteria
  • I can
  • use vocab associated with morning routines
  • construct simple sentences associated with
    routine
  • use ka to relate a series of events
  • use words and phrases to join sentences.

17
An example at senior level (Te Reo)
  • Achievement objective
  • To give and respond to information and opinions,
    giving reasons.
  • Learning intentions
  • I can
  • research my topic using the Action Research
    guidelines
  • write a persuasive essay.

18
  • Learning intention
  • To write a persuasive essay
  • Success criteria
  • I can
  • write a paragraph introducing the topic and
    expressing my opinion
  • write a paragraph stating a reason that
    supports my argument with examples
  • use linking words and phrases that we have
    studied before to enhance my essay for
    example
  • kaore e kore no doubt,
  • ehara ehara on the contrary.
  • Ka haere whakamua, Me hoki whakamuri to go
    forward you have to look at the past
  • write a concluding paragraph re-stating my
    opinion with supporting reasons.

19
Keeping the learning to the forefront
  • Learning intentions and success criteria need to
    be readily available to students.
  • Think about ways this could be done in your
    classroom
  • For the class
  • For individual students

20
References
  • Black, P., Wiliam, D. (1999). Assessment for
    learning Beyond the black box. Cambridge
    University of Cambridge.
  • Clarke, S. (2005). Formative assessment in
    action Weaving the elements together. United
    Kingdom Hodder Education.
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