Community Based Organizations: Disaster Preparedness, Response and Recovery Center for Infectious Disease Preparedness UC Berkeley School of Public Health April 19th, 2005 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Community Based Organizations: Disaster Preparedness, Response and Recovery Center for Infectious Disease Preparedness UC Berkeley School of Public Health April 19th, 2005

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Title: Community Based Organizations: Disaster Preparedness, Response and Recovery Center for Infectious Disease Preparedness UC Berkeley School of Public Health April 19th, 2005


1
Community Based OrganizationsDisaster
Preparedness, Response and Recovery Center for
Infectious Disease PreparednessUC Berkeley
School of Public Health April 19th,
2005Âna-Marie Jones, Executive
DirectorCollaborating Agencies Responding to
Disasters

2
CARD History
  • 24/7 Media Attention 1989 Loma Prieta
    Earthquake pre-empted the World Series.
  • Government, Red Cross and traditional response
    organizations could not address the level of need
    and diversity of need over the short-term or
    long-term.
  • United Way of the Bay Area stepped forward to
    help community based organizations and their
    clients with special needs. These organizations
    helped create a Vision of a humane, inclusive,
    prepared community.
  • CARD and PrepareNow partners are the keepers of
    that original Vision.

3
CARD serves the organizations that serve
  • Physically/mobility impaired
  • Low/no vision
  • Seniors/frail/elderly
  • Infants/children/teens
  • Limited /no English
  • Culturally isolated
  • Geographically isolated
  • Homeless/shelter dependent
  • Ex-convicts/registered offenders
  • Medically /chemically dependent
  • Low/no hearing
  • Medically fragile
  • Mentally disabled
  • Low-income/poor
  • Undocumented persons
  • Single parents
  • Owners of pets
  • Transient/emerging needs

4
Disaster Response Model
Traditional disaster response model is
CARD/CBO disaster response model is
5
Benefits to Including Nonprofits and Local
Community Service Agencies
  • Created and Designed for Public Benefit
  • Anchored in the Local Community
  • Builds Social Resilience
  • Supports Business Continuity
  • Diversity of Skills, Messengers, Options
  • Language/Social/Cultural Competence
  • They are specialists
  • They are the TRUSTED service providers and the
    SAFE messengers

6
Lessons Learned (almost)
  • Community services are as vital to community
    health as its physical infrastructure
  • Long-term commitment is needed from service
    agencies to repair the fabric of the community
  • Local CBOs provide the vast majority of the
    long-term social service recovery
  • CBOs will be presented with new demands that will
    exceed their current resources and capacity.

7
Nonprofits are Businesses (Part 1)
  • They have tools and resources
  • Communication systems
  • Experienced, trained, certified staff
  • Facilities (buildings, parking lots, vehicles)
  • They have structure
  • Legal requirements
  • Boards of Directors
  • Service to clients / customers

8
Nonprofits are Businesses (Part 2)
  • Same threats
  • Death injury to staff, clients, volunteers
  • Financial losses
  • Physical facility/inventory losses
  • Same needs
  • Business continuity
  • Cost recovery
  • Community relations

9
CBOs in Preparedness
  • Access to Clients
  • Service organizations reach clients more
    directly, more deeply, more rapidly, more easily,
    more naturally.
  • Trusted by Clients
  • Service organizations have established
    relationships with clients as trusted information
    providers and caregivers.
  • Community organizations provide support and
    services once filled by families and extended
    families.

10
CBOs in Response
  • On scene First Responders
  • Community organizations are frequently the ones
    actually with clients either during the disaster
    itself or immediately afterwards. This makes
    their participation in disaster response
    especially important to those they serve.
  • Understanding of Needs and Concerns
  • Community organizations understand the needs of
    their clients, and their specialized services
    will be more important during times of crisis.
    They also serve as advocates for the clients and
    they are the safe liaison between their clients
    and government / Red Cross and other bureaucratic
    or unfamiliar structures.

11
CBOs in Recovery
  • CBOs often supplement and reach beyond government
    disaster aid programs
  • Resources distributed in partnership with or
    through local CBOs are much more likely to reach
    the most vulnerable people with needs
  • Many needs do not become apparent immediately but
    may instead surface months or years later when
    imported support and other government programs
    have gone away or have been transitioned out

12
Recovery brings
  • Increased Demand
  • People recovering from disasters will often turn
    to CBOs for support, creating a much bigger
    demand for services. This is particularly true
    of stress-related issues such as
  • Domestic violence and child abuse
  • Suicide prevention
  • Substance abuse

and financial / economic survival needs
  • Food and shelter programs
  • Job training and placement
  • Rent/repair/replacement support

13
How CBOs Complement Traditional Emergency
Services
  • Intimate Awareness of Special Needs
  • Service organizations are familiar with the
    unique needs, concerns and culture of their
    clients, both as a group and as individuals.
  • Customization
  • Service organizations can move past
    one-size-fits-all and help their clients reach
    the kind of preparedness suited to their
    particular needs and concerns.

14
7 Common Mistakes Made in Engaging CBOs
Special Needs Groups
  • Not understanding the needs of target audience
  • Failure to respect existing systems and
    structures
  • Sending the wrong message with the wrong
    messenger
  • Failure to anchor offer to long-term strategy
    (a.k.a. Practicing Random Acts of
    Preparedness)
  • Seeing the help, but not the hurt caused by the
    offer
  • Offering too basic, too advanced or not
    appropriate info
  • Not understanding resource issues and limitations
    of target audience

15
The San Leandro Model
  • The Triad Alliance
  • CBOs serving the residents of San Leandro
  • City of San Leandro
  • CARD
  • Partners in preparedness, response, recovery
  • Economic/Financial Benefits
  • Successes
  • Corridor of Safety Alerting Warning Sirens
  • Davis Street Word-of-Mouth Spread
  • DCARA Deaf Counseling Advocacy Referral
    Agency 1.5 Million Dollar Federal Grant

16
For more Information Âna-Marie
Jones Collaborating Agencies Responding to
Disasters (CARD)
1730 Franklin Street, Suite 202 Oakland, CA
94612 www.FirstVictims.org
Phone 510-451-3140 Fax 510-451-3144 CARD_Proj_at_ya
hoo.com
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