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Career Action Planning

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Career Action Planning Arkansas Dept of Career Education Office of Career Guidance, Exploration, and Preparation * Main Point: Skilled workers in high demand. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Career Action Planning


1
Career Action Planning
  • Arkansas Dept of Career Education
  • Office of Career Guidance, Exploration, and
    Preparation

2
Improving College and Career Readiness Indicators
  • Improve graduation rates
  • Increase nontraditional placement
  • Raise college entrance rates
  • Improve positive postsecondary placement
  • Increase program of study completers
  • Reduce necessity for remediation
  • Improve parental involvement
  • Improve level of student satisfaction with
    education

3
Successful Positive Employment comes from
consistent and continuous
  • Career guidance, exploration, preparation and
    planning
  • Self discovery and assessment
  • Career employability training
  • Rigorous education in the SMART Core Curriculum
  • Career portfolio development

4
What we are doing is not good enough!
  • 47 of job applicants lacked the reading, writing
    and math skills for the jobs they sought
  • 73 of US employers cited very or somewhat
    difficulty hiring qualified workers
  • 40 said applicants have poor or no employment
    skills
  • The 2010 Meltdown Solving the Impending Job
    Crisis

5
U.S. Literacy Woes
  • 50 of current workers had serious reading,
    writing, and math skills
  • 5 of all American adults speak English so poorly
    they cannot hold a high-paying job
  • 90 million Americans face higher health risks
    because their low literacy leads to trouble
    understanding medical terms
  • 60 billion per year is lost in productivity

6
Assessing the Pipeline to Americas Workforce
  • More than 50 of employers couldn't find
    qualified applicants for entry-level jobs
  • Over 50 of adults are unhappy in their jobs
  • A 2004 Gallup poll indicated that more than 55
    of people in the workforce were not engaged in
    their work
  • An estimated 80 are underemployed

7
Are They Really Ready to Work?
  • Those hired at entry level found to be
    unprepared... Insufficient academic skills
    inadequate abilities to work in teams, think
    critically and communicate could imperil the
    success of Americas youth and the
    competitiveness of the U.S. economy. according
    to a report issued October 2, 2006
  • from 431 HR officials across the country.

8
About 70 of the employers found recently hired
high school graduates lacking in personal
accountability and effective work habits,
including punctuality, time management and being
able to work productively with others.
9
The gap is growing between employer expectations
and applicants competency,
  • Professionalism/Work Ethic
  • Oral and Written Communications
  • Teamwork/Collaboration and
  • Critical Thinking/Problem Solving

10
Workforce Readiness Report Card
  • Deficiency
  • Written Communications . . . . . . . . . . . .
    80.9
  • Professionalism/Work Ethic . . . . . . . . . .
    70.3
  • Critical Thinking/Problem Solving . . . . . 69.6
  • Oral Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    52.7
  • Ethics/Social Responsibility . . . . . . . . . .
    44.1
  • Reading Comprehension . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    38.4
  • Teamwork/Collaboration . . . . . . . . . . . .
    34.6
  • Diversity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . 27.9
  • Information Technology Application . . . . 21.5
  • English Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . 21.0

11
Applied Skills expected to increase in importance
  • 1 Critical Thinking/Problem Solving . . . . .
    77.8
  • 2 Information Technology Application . . . .
    77.4
  • 3 Teamwork/Collaboration . . . . . . . . . . . .
    74.2
  • 4 Creativity/Innovation . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . 73.6
  • 5 Diversity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . . . 67.1
  • 6 Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . . . . 66.9
  • 7 Oral Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    . . 65.9
  • 8 Professionalism/Work Ethic . . . . . . . . . .
    64.4
  • 9 Ethics/Social Responsibility . . . . . . . . .
    64.3
  • 10 Written Communications . . . . . . . . . . .
    . 64.0
  • Percentage of 424 CEO respondents who expect
    skills to increase--

12
Demographic Issues Warrant Action
  • With significant numbers of workers retiring
    over the next 10 years, the United States is
    facing a serious challenge in preparing students
    to meet workplace demands in an increasingly
    complex, knowledge and
  • technology-based, global economy.
  • - The Conference Board, 2006

13
Where are the students?
  • Arkansas has a 69 adjusted graduation rate from
    those who began the 9th grade
  • Most college preparation counseling is done in
    the 11th and 12th grades, but the highest dropout
    rates are in the 9th and 10th grades.
  • Highest number of GED recipients are in the 16-17
    age range

14
College Prep?
  • 1/3 of college students leave after their first
    year in college
  • Another 30 take five or six years to earn their
    degree
  • Almost 50 of college students never graduate

15
Changing Majors
  • College students needing 228 hours to receive a
    Bachelors Degree when 128 is required!
  • Harding School of Business study
  • Why do students change majors?
  • Influenced by high school teacher
  • Do what parents expect them to do
  • Exposure to new majors

16
Colleges Balance Workload
  • Attract and admit freshman from high school to
    less popular majors
  • Restrict access to popular majors
  • Retain students in less popular majors
  • UCLA

17
Reasons College Students Changed Majors--UCLA
  • I became more interested in another subject 54.5
  • My career plans changed 32.1
  • The preparatory classes werent interesting 25.2
  • The courses were too difficult 25.2
  • The classes in the major werent interesting
    24.9
  • My grades were too low 21.9
  • Other students were too competitive 20.9
  • My previous major did not deal with real world
    issues or applications 17.8
  • The graduation requirements were too extensive
    10.7

18
Increasing the high school and college
graduation rate of male students in Arkansas by
only five percent could lead to a combined
savings and revenue of almost 77 million each
year by reducing crime-related costs (Alliance
for Excellent Education, June 2007).
19
Where are the Boys
  • According to Arkansas Kuder data
  • There are 12 more girls in the 11th and 12th
    grades compared to a 50/50 ratio in the 8th
    grade.
  • According to Ark Dept of Higher Ed
  • There are about 10 more girls graduating than
    boys from 4-year universities.

20
Arkansas DWE White Papers
  • If Arkansas high schools and colleges raise the
    graduation rates of Hispanic, African-American,
    and Native-American students to the levels of
    white students by 2020, the potential increase in
    personal income would add more than 785 million
    to the state economy.

21
By Helping Our Students We Help Ourselves
  • If Arkansas likely dropouts from the class of
    2006 graduated instead, the state could save more
    than 94 million in Medicaid and expenditures for
    uninsured care over the course of those young
    peoples lifetimes.
  • Dropouts will cost the state more than 2.7
    billion in lost wages, taxes, and productivity
    over their lifetimes.

22
We cannot be what we cannot see. Jocelyn
Elders
  • Students from low socioeconomic backgrounds lack
    the vision of a successful career
  • This is a generation that is accustomed to being
    told, "you're special." When they realize they
    are not they may give up and drop out.

23
500 dropouts, ages 16-25, were interviewed
  • 47 said classes were not interesting
  • 43 missed too many days to catch up
  • 45 entered high school poorly prepared by their
    earlier schooling
  • 69 said they were not motivated to work hard
  • 35 said they were failing
  • 32 said they left to get a job
  • 25 left to become parents
  • 22 left to take care of a relative

24
Low Expectations
  • Two-thirds of drop-outs said they would have
    tried harder if more was expected from themRead
    more http//educationalissues.suite101.com/articl
    e.cfm/dropouts_give_reasonsixzz0RCVvzvrI

25
What happens to Dropouts
  • More likely to be
  • unemployed
  • in prison
  • living in poverty
  • receiving government assistance
  • less healthy
  • divorced
  • single parents

26
What is working!
  • evening classes
  • more GED opportunities
  • tutoring
  • allowing students to return when older

27
Students are Disengaged
  • Nearly 38 percent of the young adults said the
    freedom students enjoy in high school contributed
    to their disengagement.
  • Too easy to skip class or join in activities
    outside of school,
  • Too much freedom--included the schools lack of
    order, discipline and rules
  • failure to ensure students attend class
  • inability to help students feel safe.

28
How to Engage Students in School
  • Make school more relevant and engaging and
    enhance the connection between school and work
  • Improve instruction and access to supports for
    struggling students
  • More supervision and discipline in school is
    necessary
  • Ensure strong adult-student relationships in the
    school. The respondents craved and appreciated
    attention from teachers

29
Absenteeism
  • We discovered that as early as kindergarten,
    differences exist between graduates and dropouts
    namely, dropouts miss more school than
    graduates," Hickman said. "Dropouts miss an
    average of 124 days by eighth grade. Educators
    should begin developing strategies to improve
    student attendance from as early as
    kindergarten."

30
Parental Involvement
  • Improve communication between parents and
    schools. Approximately 70 percent of those
    surveyed said better communication between school
    and parents and increased parental involvement in
    their childs education are essential to keeping
    students in school.
  • Council for Exceptional Children

31
When Parents are Involved
  • Higher grades and test scores
  • Long term academic achievement
  • Positive attitudes and behavior
  • More successful programs
  • More effective schools
  • Univ of Illinois

32
When Parents Get Involved
  • The earlier in a childs educational process
    parent involvement begins, the more powerful the
    effects.2
  • The most effective forms of parent involvement
    are those, which engage parents in working
    directly with their children on learning
    activities at home. (home work)
  • Univ of Michigan

33
What is the common thread?
  • Employers are saying applicants are not prepared
  • Colleges are saying freshmen are not ready
  • Nationally 51 of high school juniors and
    seniors said, No one advised them
  • on their future education options.
  • The 2010 Meltdown, by Edward Gordon

34
Career Counseling
  • Students are getting little or no career advice
    from high school guidance counselorsThe K-12
    education system is cracking from the lack of
    career counseling,
  • Phyllis Eisen, VP Manufacturing Institute Exec
    Dir Center for Workforce Success

35
The Ambition Paradox2010 Meltdown
  • Students with high ambitions choose an education
    route with low odds of success.
  • Many students opt for college because they dont
    know what else to do with their lives.
  • Most students give little realistic thought to
    how their aptitudes translate into worthwhile
    careers.

36
Why are students ill prepared for the workforce?
What do employers expect?
  • maturity
  • multitasking ability
  • oral and written communication skills
  • people skills and a team attitude
  • problem solving skills
  • related work experience
  • reliability and responsibility.
  • computer skills
  • enthusiasm
  • flexibility
  • involvement in community
  • knowledge beyond field of employment  
  • leadership experience
  • logic and reasoning skills
  • Loyalty

37
Changes in Workforce Skills Needs Across Fifty
Years
Unskilled 12
Skilled 20
Professional 20
Skilled 68
Unskilled 60
Professional 20
1955
2005
38
The Institute of Education and the Economy
Concluded
  • Many different types of career guidance
    interventions are effective
  • Career development activities positively
    influence school attendance and completion
  • Simple planning will help students connect their
    goals and steps to reach them

39
Results from Lapan, Gysbers, and Sun concluded
students in Missouri
  • Make better grades
  • Have more college and career information
  • Believe their school has a positive climate
  • Feel middle school is safer
  • Have a better relationship with their teachers
  • Are more satisfied with their education

40
A HSTW study concluded
  • Students who completed a 4-year high school plan
    increased math test scores
  • Students spent more time talking with counselors
  • Math, science and reading scores improved
  • Career guidance increased college-prep math and
    science classes

41
Information is Vital2010 Meltdown by Edward
Gordon
  • Schools can help students by helping their
    parents
  • Career aptitude and personal interest assessments
    need to be provided in middle schools
  • Future workers need higher quality education
    which integrates arts and sciences with emerging
    technology

42
Improve the quality of career planning
interventions provided to help students
  • Meet personal goals
  • Successfully transition through the educational
    system smoothly and efficiently
  • Graduate successfully
  • Become employable with employability skills and
    industry certifications
  • Successfully reach career goals

43
Assessing The Whole Person
44
Career Exploration and PlanningInterventions in
Middle and Junior High Schools
  • Career Orientation
  • Exploration of the world of work
  • Self-Discovery
  • Self-Assessment resulting in career
    pathways
  • Career Development Portfolio
  • Occupational Research
  • Education and Training Research
  • Goal Setting, Decision-making and Planning

45
High School Interventions
  • Keystone (9th grade transition elective)
  • Workplace Readiness
  • 11th-12th grade elective using KeyTrain to
    prepare students for ACT WorkKeys)
  • Work-based Learning
  • (JAG, Internship Youth Apprenticeship
    electives)
  • Extended Learning Opportunities
  • Job Shadowing, B I Tours, CTSOs, Mentoring

46
KeyTrain in Secondary Schools
  • Students in Workplace Readiness will be required
    to use KeyTrain to prepare for the ACT WorkKeys
    Assessments.
  • Internship will allow students to use KeyTrain in
    schools where Workplace Readiness is not being
    offered.

47
WorkKeys Implementation
  • Dept of Workforce Services contracted with
    Thinking Media to provide KeyTrain to dislocated
    workers and high school students in grades 11 and
    12.
  • ACT WorkKeys assessments were purchased to
    provide job seekers with the CRC credential.

48
Where do students begin?
  • Assess current knowledge with KeyTrain pretests
  • Identify occupational needs for career goal
  • Assign KeyTrain lessons at pretest level so
    students can work at their own pace to the level
    they need to achieve
  • Bridge the gap between being unemployable and
    being hirable.

49
WorkKeys Identifies Skill Gaps
  • By comparing the job profile and individual
    assessment results, skills gaps can be identified

6
Skills Gap
5
5
5
Skills Gap
4
4
4
4
4
4
Individual Results
3
3
3
3
3
3
Job Profile
Applied Mathematics
Reading for Information
Locating Information
50
Job Seekers
  • Must score at least a level 4 on the KeyTrain in
    Reading for Information, Applied Mathematics, and
    Locating Information.
  • Must also register with the Arkansas Job Links
  • Instructor refers KeyTrain completers to a
    two-year community college for the WorkKeys
    assessment
  • Career Readiness Certificates are then awarded to
    students receiving the Bronze, Silver or Gold
    Certificate.

51
Career Readiness Certification
  • Arkansas Career Readiness Certificates Awarded to
    Date 17,309  
  • Bronze 3,222
  • Silver 9,361
  • Gold 4,726
  • Percentage for Each Certificate Level  
    Bronze19 Silver 54 Gold 27

52
(No Transcript)
53
WorkKeys is a System
Job Profiling to match applicants with jobs
Skill Assessments Measures an individuals skill
level
Career Guidance
Education/ Training Efficiently closes skill gaps
54
ArkansasAtWork.orgArkansas Career Readiness
Certificate
  • Governors Initiative Video Spot
  • http//www.state.ar.us/esd/Programs/CRC/Video.htm
  • Radio Spot
  • http//www.state.ar.us/esd/Programs/CRC/Radio.htm
  • We must have a career ready workforce
  • Governor Mike Beebe

55
Follow-through not just Follow-up
  • Time to visit periodically with a career coach,
    counselor, or advisor
  • A place for college and career research
  • Continued development of a personal career
    portfolio
  • Opportunities for job shadowing and B I tours
  • Labor market information

56
Arkansas Works Initiative
  • Three-year pilot project to place 43 Career
    Coaches in the 21 lowest socioeconomic counties
    to improve state indicators and the overall
    economy of the state.
  • Kuder Navigator and Journey systems including
    Link-to-College and Connect-to-Business

57
Kuder
  • http//arworks.arkansas.gov/Pages/default.aspx
  • http//www.arworkscareer.com/
  • Access for Navigator and Journey

58
Navigator Components
  • 104 Sample Plans for each Career Cluster Pathway
    (New Feb 22nd)
  • Individualized electronic 4-year plans (Feb 22)
  • Explore and Plan results uploaded to student
  • Link to College
  • Connect to Business w/E-Portfolios
  • Needs assessment, Setting goals, Postsecondary
    Plans (April 5th)

59
Career Development Facilitators
  • A (CDF) is a person who has been specially
    trained to work with students or dislocated
    workers to assist with vocational and educational
    planning, assessments, and workforce preparation
    from middle school through postsecondary
    education and the adult workforce.

60
Positions for which CDFs could be trained for
  • Student Career Development Coach
  • Career Action Plan Program Facilitator
  • School Career Guidance Counselor
  • Job Search Trainer
  • Co-op and Tech Center Coordinators
  • Employment/Placement Specialists
  • College Counselor/Recruiter

61
Becoming a CDF will
  • Allow an individual to improve the quality of
    career planning interventions provided to
    students.
  • Enriches and broadens knowledge and skills for
    working with students in vocational and
    educational planning.
  • Provides a scope of practice to provide services
    to students
  • It provides national certification under NCDA.
  • Professional recognition

62
CDF Competencies
  • Helping Skills
  • Diverse Populations
  • Ethical and Legal Issues
  • Consultation
  • Career Development Models
  • Assessment
  • Labor Market Information
  • Career Development Technology
  • Employability Skills
  • Training
  • Program Management and Implementation
  • Promotion and Public Relations

63
Helping Skills Be proficient in the basic
processes of career facilitation while
maintaining productive interpersonal skills.
  • Attending
  • Listening
  • Coaching
  • Interviewing
  • Create action plan
  • Identifying strengths
  • Overcoming barriers
  • Referring
  • Goal Setting
  • Coaching/encourging

64
Labor Market Information Use key labor market
and occupational information and trends and be
able to access and use current resources.
  • Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH)
  • ONet
  • Americas Career InfoNet (Career OneStop)
  • Discover Arkansas
  • Kuder Journey

65
Assessment Comprehend and use both formal and
informal career development assessment tools and
resources
  • Interest Inventories
  • Aptitude Assessments
  • Work Values Inventories
  • Skills Assessments
  • Personality Typing
  • Career Maturity/Beliefs

66
Working with Diverse Populations Recognize the
special needs of various groups and adapt service
menus to meet unique needs
  • Demographic trends
  • Overcoming physical barriers
  • Crossing social stereotypes and nontraditional
    placement
  • Recognizing strength in diversity

67
Ethical and Legal Issues Follow the CDF Code of
Ethics and know current legislative regulations
  • Scope of Practice
  • Extent of training
  • CDF/Client Relationship
  • Consultation Referrals
  • NCDA Code of Ethics

68
Career Development TheoryFacilitate career
development across a wide population group
  • Holland Code (Personality Types)
  • ACT Plan World of Work Map
  • Learning Theory Krumboltz
  • Seven-Step Decision-Making Process
  • Planned Happenstance
  • Career Development Theory Super
  • Work Importance based on values

69
Employability Skills Job search strategies and
placement techniques for specific groups of
students or clients
  • Job Search Strategies
  • Professional Networking
  • Interviewing Techniques
  • Informational Interviewing
  • Resume Building
  • Portfolio Development

70
Training Clients, Students PeersIdentify
training materials and development needs
  • Individual hands-on training
  • Assessment, observation computer
  • Group facilitation training
  • Lecture, role playing, PowerPoint,
    demonstration
  • Facility tours, job shadowing, informational
    interviewing

71
Program Managementand Implementation Career
development program management and
administration
  • Identify define target population
    (clients/students)
  • Identify specific population (student) needs
  • Write concrete measureable objectives/goals
  • Identify available resources
  • Network with CDFs and service agencies

72
Promotion and Public Relations Market and promote
career development programs with staff,
supervisors, and the local community
  • Identify stakeholders and related career service
    providers
  • Recruiters, counselors, Career Pathways, teachers
  • Campus Career Center
  • Motivate the targeted audience
  • Especially high risk students

73
Career Development Technology Identify,
comprehend, and use computer applications that
support and enhance career development processes.
  • Database occupational research
  • Cross walking colleges and majors
  • Financial aid
  • Developing an e-portfolio (Shared with counselors
    and employers)
  • On-line self-awareness assessments
  • Kuder (specifically)

74
Consultation/Supervision Identify limits of
personal expertise and scope of practice
  • Consult with hierarchy of supervision
  • CDFs role (undefined) between secondary and
    postsecondary
  • Under the supervision of local counselors
  • NCDA Guidelines

75
Course RequirementsPersonal Abilities
  • Computer and Internet Availability
  • Basic Computer Skills (Word, Copy, Paste, Email
    Attachments, Files, Flash Drive)
  • Organizational Skills (Course Work)
  • Time Management (Meet Weekly Assignment Deadlines)

76
Course Information
  • The e-learning course Facilitating Career
    Development offered by Kuder Educational Training
    Associates (Kuder ETA)
  • It is led by NCDA-approved instructors and
    features the most up-to-date career planning
    resources.
  • Go to http//etainc.com

77
Course Specifics
  • 120 hours of on-line instruction
  • Including student manual, internet-based weekly
    lessons, student collaboration and forum,
    research, projects, portfolio development, career
    center tour, case study, and informational
    interview.
  • 24 hours of Face-to-face Instruction
  • Role playing, in-take interviews presentations

78
Cost
  • CDF Class 1,500.00 per person
  • Plus travel expenses for the face-to-face session
  • 100.00 NCDA certification
  • 25.00 Annual renewal fee
  • NCDA ACDA annual dues

79
Global CDF Certification Requirements
  • Education Experience
  • Graduate Degree 1,400 hours
  • Bachelors Degree 2,800 hours
  • Associates Degree 4,200 hours
  • HS Diploma/GED 5,600 hours

80
Career Development Association
  • State Chapter of the NCDA and Network for
  • Dept of Career Education Staff
  • Secondary School Counselors
  • CTE Program of Study Teachers
  • College Counselors/Recruiters
  • Career Pathways Administrators
  • Workforce Services Staff

81
Spring Career Development Conference
  • March 14-16, Eureka Springs, Best Western Inn of
    the Ozarks
  • AudienceCounselors, Career Coaches, Career
    Development Facilitators, and Career Guidance
    Teachers
  • ScopeCareer Planning and Development

82
Arkansas Career Guidance Association
  • Association made up primarily of Career Guidance
    TeachersCareer Orientation, Workplace Readiness,
    Internship, and EAST/Workforce Technology
  • Student contests
  • Summer conference (July 15-16)

83
ADCE Involvement
  • CDF (Perkins Reserve Funds for training)
  • Kuder Navigator development for College and
    Career Planning System
  • Articulation for college credit for CTE programs
    of study.
  • Career Guidance and Planning (Technical
    Assistance)

84
Carl Perkins Activities for CTE Students
  • Improve Graduation / Completion Rates
  • Improve Non-traditional Placement
  • Improve Placement after Graduation
  • Includes
  • Professional Development
  • Portfolio Folders
  • Technology
  • Articulation
  • Motivation (Speakers

85
Student Certifications and Recognitions
  • Arkansas Career Readiness Certificate
  • Business and Industry Certifications where
    available (Perkins approvable)
  • Program of Study Certificates of Completion
  • Completion awards (Seals, Cords, Certificates)

86
CTE Program of Study Electives
  • Workplace Readiness (11th 12th grade)
  • Internship (11th 12th Grade)
  • EAST/Workforce Technology (9th-12th)
  • Career Cluster Senior Seminar (11th 12th grade)

87
WHAT IS CAP? Career Action Planning
  • A cooperative way to help students make plans for
    their future and prepare them to meet those goals
  • Provide an advisor to every student with time to
    devote to making concrete plans.
  • Provide career planning for all students with
    parental involvement and career decision-making
    skills from middle school up.
  • Provides opportunities for students to focus on
    personal education plans and career goals.

88
A CAPS PROGRAM
  • Establishes written goals a plan of action for
    each student
  • Records each students growth in achieving the
    education/skills needed to succeed
  • Provides follow-up and evaluation for parents and
    students
  • Informs students of job availability, job duties
    responsibilities, education and training
    required, pay growth potential, availability of
    secondary and post- secondary
    education/training.

89
WHY SHOULD WE HAVE CAP?
  • Organizes career development into a manageable
    time frame and team effort.
  • Provides opportunity for shared responsibility
    for personal education and career development by
    including parents, students, teachers, and
    counselors.

90
Additional Reasons for aCAP Program
  • Enables students to gain skills and background
    necessary to make good educational and career
    decisions.
  • Encourages students to set educational goals and
    construct a plan to meet those goals.
  • Improves relations between school faculty,
    parents, business, industry, and other community
    members.

91
Career Development Portfolio
  • Collection of assessments
  • Record of accomplishments
  • Contains Resumes Application Examples
  • Education and Training Plan of Action
  • Opportunity for Creative Self-expression
  • Process for Career Development
  • Self Discovery Evaluation
  • Business industry Certifications

92
  • A Career Pathway is
  • A coherent, articulated sequence of rigorous
    academic and career/technical courses, commencing
    in the ninth grade and leading to an associate
    degree, baccalaureate degree and beyond,
  • An industry recognized certificate, and/or
    licensure.
  • Developed, implemented, and maintained in
    partnership among secondary and postsecondary
    education, business and industry.

93
Sum of all the Parts
  • Status Quo is not sufficient
  • Rigorous and Relevant Career Ready Curriculum
  • Career Planning and Development
  • Parental Involvement
  • Career Development Facilitators
  • Make the future realistic with individualized
    career plans that meet student needs

94
  • For more information please contact
  • Ray Henson, Program Manager
  • Dept of Career Education
  • Office of Career Guidance, Exploration, and
    Preparation
  • Three Capitol Mall, Suite 408
  • Little Rock, AR 72201
  • 501-682-1616
  • raymond.henson_at_arkansas.gov
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