. . . .every Museum of Modern Art in the United States and Europe should be required, in the spirit of truth in advertising, to change its name to Museum of Western Modernism until it has earned the right to do otherwise. - Holland Cotter - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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. . . .every Museum of Modern Art in the United States and Europe should be required, in the spirit of truth in advertising, to change its name to Museum of Western Modernism until it has earned the right to do otherwise. - Holland Cotter

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British control of India began in 1757, lasted 190 years, and ended in 1947. . . . .every Museum of Modern Art in the United States and Europe should be required ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: . . . .every Museum of Modern Art in the United States and Europe should be required, in the spirit of truth in advertising, to change its name to Museum of Western Modernism until it has earned the right to do otherwise. - Holland Cotter


1
. . . .every Museum of Modern Art in the
United States and Europe should be required, in
the spirit of truth in advertising, to change its
name to Museum of Western Modernism until it has
earned the right to do otherwise. -
Holland Cotter NYTimes
British control of India began in 1757, lasted
190 years, and ended in 1947.
Pre-Colonial Mughal Art Portrait of Amr Singh
attributed to Bishin Das dated 1624 AD
Abanindranath Tagore (Indian, 1871-1951) My
Mother, N/D, c.1920 12.7 x 20.3 cm
2
Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941) , father of
Indian Modernism poet, novelist, educator,
artist, reformer, critic of colonialism, early
advocate of Independence for India, winner of the
Nobel prize for literature in 1913
Rabindrinath Tagore and Einstein, July 14, 1930
Poem visually composed
Dancing Girl, oil painting, 1910?
3
(No Transcript)
4
Nandalal Bose (Indian,1882-1966), New Clouds,
1937. Tempera on paper, 16 5/8 x 27 1/2 inches.
National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi.
5
Nandalal Bose, Village Huts, 1928. Watercolor and
wash on paper, 8 1/2 x 15 1/2 inches. National
Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi.
6
CUBISM
  • Hand in hand Braque and Picasso left behind the
    world of simple appearances. . . . The two
    friends worked toward the solution of the same
    problems, now one, now the other finding the
    means to achieve seemingly identical goals.
  • Wilhelm Uhde, 1928
  • Recalling the development of
  • Cubism between 1908-1914

7
(left) Georges Braque (French, 1882-1963) in
his Paris studio, early 1912 (right) Pablo
Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973) in his Paris studio,
late 1911
In spite of out very different temperaments, we
were guided by a common idea . . . .the
differences didnt count. . . . We lived in
Montmartre, we saw each other every day, we
talked. . . . It was a little like being roped
together on a mountain. Georges Braque on
his friendship with Picasso and the
formulation of Cubism, 1908-1914
8
Picasso, Portrait of the Artists Mother, 1896
Picasso is 15 years old.
  • What people regard as premature genius is the
    genius of childhood.
  • So far as I am concerned, I did not have that
    genius. My first drawings could never have been
    shown at an exhibition of childrens drawings. I
    lacked the clumsiness of a child, his naiveté. I
    made academic drawings at the age of seven, the
    minute precision of which frightened me.
  • Picasso

Self-Portrait, 1896
9
Picasso, Le Moulin de la Galette, 1900, oil, 35 x
46(right top) Édouard Manet, Masked Ball at
the Opera, 1873, 59 x 72 cm
Edvard Munch, Dance of Life, 1889
10
Picasso, La Vie, 1903, 65x 42, Blue Period
SymbolismGauguin, Where Do We Come From, What
Are We? Where Are We Going? 1897-98
11
(left) Paris apartment of American expatriates
Gertrude and Leo Stein, 27 rue de Fleurus, Paris,
the location of the famous Saturday evening
salons.(right) Le Bateau-Lavoir, a block of
buildings in Montmartre, Paris where Picasso
lived from 1904-1909
Recommended readings The Autobiography of Alice
B. Toklas (a 1933 autobiography of Gertrude
Stein) and The Banquet Years The Origins of the
Avant-Garde in France, 1885 to World War I by
Roger Shattock
12
(left) Picasso, Family of Saltimbanques, 1905,
oil on canvas, 84 x 90 in, a major work of the
Harlequin or Rose period (right) Edouard
Manet, The Old Musician, 1872, oil on canvas, 90
3/4 x 114 in. Catalogue of the Parisian
dispossessed anomie self-identified with Manet
and the avant-garde
Picasso as harlequin trickster clown
Daumier, Wandering Saltimbanques, 1847/50
13
Picasso, Family of Saltimbanques, 1905Antoine
Watteau (Flemish-French, 1684-1721, Rococo)
commedia dell'arte player of Pierrot, ca 1718-19,
traditionally identified as Gilles (Louvre)
14
http//www.english.upenn.edu/jenglish/Courses/Spr
ing02/104/steinpicasso.htmlPicasso, Portrait of
Gertrude Stein, oil on canvas,1906, 39 x 32
Bequest of Gertrude Stein, The Metropolitan
Museum of Art, New York
Ingres, Portrait of Louis-Francois Bertin, 1832,
Louvre
Stein with portrait, 1922
15
Iberian stone relief showing facial structure of
1906 portraits
Picasso, Self-Portrait, 1906
Detail, Gertrude Stein, 1906
16
Picasso, Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, Paris,
June-July 1907, oil on canvas, 8' x 7' 8The
artist is 25 years old.
17
(left) Edgar Degas, Name Day of the Madame, 1889,
monotype and pastel Compare with Les Demoiselles
DAvignon
18
(left) Paul Cézanne, Large Bathers, oil on
canvas, 52 x 86 in.,1900-05 with Les Demoiselles
19
Henri Matisse, Joy of Life, 1905-06with Les
Demoiselles, 1907
20
(left) Henri Rousseau (French Post-Impressionist
Painter, 1844-1910), The Dream, 1910
21
Picasso, Studies for Les Demoiselles D'Avignon,
spring, 1907, (left) oil on canvas, 7 1/2 x 8
(right) watercolor. A quantity of preparatory
work unparalleled for one picture in the history
of art.
22
Transformative influence of African tribal
sculpture Picassos epiphany in June 1907 at the
ethnographic museum in ParisBraque It is as
if someone had drunk kerosene to spit fire."
  • My first exorcism painting.
  • For me the masks were not just sculptures. They
    were magical objects...intercessors...against
    everything - against unknown threatening
    spirits....They were weapons . . . to keep people
    from being ruled by spirits. To help them free
    themselves. . . . If we give a form to these
    spirits we become free."

23
(left) Pablo Picasso, Three Women, 1907-8, oil on
canvas, 66 x 76(right) Georges Braque
(French, 1882-1963), Large Nude, 1908, oil on
canvas, 55 x 39begun immediately after seeing
Les Demoiselles and the first stage of Three
Women.
24
(left) Henri Matisse (French, 18691954) The Blue
Nude (Souvenir of Biskra) 1907, oil on canvas,
36 x 55, Fauvism(right) Braque, Large Nude,
1908, oil on canvas, 55 x 39 Influence of
Matisse on Braque (and Picasso). Matisse
introduced Picasso to African art in the autumn
of 1906.
25
Shared Primitivism (right) Picasso in Paris
studio with Caledonian figures, 1908(left)
Braque in Paris studio with African masks, 1911
26
Georges Braque, Pre-Picasso Fauve painting
(left) Landscape near Antwerp (Paysage près
d'Anvers), 1906, oil on canvas, 24 x 32,
(right) Matissse, Le bonheur de vivre (The Joy
of Life) 1905-1906, oil on canvas 69 x 95
27
Braque, Viaduct at L'Estaque, autumn 1907, oil on
canvas, 25 x 31 in.Braque sees Cézanne
retrospective in Paris, October,1907, at the
Salon dAutomne
28
Braque, Houses at LEstaque, August 1908, oil on
canvas, 28 x 23painted after his Large
Nude(right) Paul Cézanne, The Bay from
LEstaque, oil on canvas, 31 x 38, 1886Braques
evolving Cézannism. Fauve palette has
disappeared.
Matisse disapproves of Braques little cubes,
and, as jurist for the Salon DAutomne, rejects
Braques paintings. Cubism is named. Picasso and
Braque begin to see each other daily. Studios
are minutes apart.
29
(left) Braque, Harbor in Normandy, summer 1909
(right) Picasso, Houses on the Hill, Horta de
Ebro, summer 1909 with photograph of the Spanish
town by the artist (below).In 1909 both Picasso
and Braque stopped showing their paintings in the
salons.
Cubist figure-ground ambiguity, faceting, and
monochromatic palette
30
Picasso, Woman's Head (Fernande), bronze, summer
1909 (right) Woman with Pears, Fernande, oil on
canvas, summer 1909(center) Picasso and
Fernande Olivier in Montmartre, c. 1908
31
(left) Braque, Violin and Palette, autumn 1909,
oil, 36 x 17 Note use of trompe loeil nail
an allusion to Renaissance illusionism(right)
Picasso, Girl with a Mandolin (Fanny Tellier),
1910
32
In the early days of Cubism, Pablo Picasso and I
were engaged in what we felt was a search for the
anonymous personality. We were inclined to
efface our own personalities in order to find
originality. - Braque
  • Georges Braque (left) and Pablo Picasso (right)
    wearing Braques military uniform, Braques
    apartment, Paris, 1911. The exchanges of 1911 and
    1912 show the collaboration-competition at its
    height.

33
(left) Pablo Picasso, The Accordionist, 1911, oil
on canvas, 51 x 35 in(right) Georges Braque, The
Portuguese (The Emigrant), 1911, 46 x 32Braque
introduces stencil-type letters outside of
space literalizing the canvas surface
Analytic Cubism
34
We didnt sign are canvases because we felt the
temptation, the hope of an anonymous art, not in
its expression, but in its point of departure.
We were trying to set up a new order and it had
to express itself through different individuals.
Nobody needed to know that it was so-and-so who
had done this or that painting. . . . But
individualism was already too strong, and that
effort resulted in failure. . . . - Picasso
(left) Picasso, Ma Jolie (Woman with a Guitar),
1911(right) Braque, The Portuguese (The
Emigrant), 1911
35
Braque, Homage to J.S.Bach, oil on canvas, 21 x
28, Céret, Winter 1911-12First use of trompe
loeil wood grain created with housepainters
combsPicasso, The Poet, summer 1912, oil on
canvas, 23 x 19Picasso, instructed by Braque,
uses housepainters combs for the hair, adding an
element of wit.
Almost every evening, either I went to
Braques studio or Braque came to mine. Each of
us had to see what the other had done during the
day. - Picasso (recalling 1910-12)
36
(left) Braques only documented paper sculpture,
photographed in 1914(right) Wall arrangement in
Picassos studio, November-December 1912.
Picassos cardboard guitar generated the concept
of the papiers collés around it
37
Picasso, Maquette for Guitar, October 1912,
cardboard, string and wire(right) Grebo mask
owned by Picasso
  • Youll see. Im going to hold on to the
    Guitar, but I shall sell its plan. Everyone will
    be able to make it himself.
  • Picasso to André Salmon

38
(left) Picasso, Guitar, Sheet Music and Glass,
charcoal and papier collé, November 1912 (right)
Braque, Fruit Dish and Glass, charcoal and papier
collé, September 1912
LA BATAILLE SEST ENGAGÉ I have to admit,
that after having made the papier collé I felt a
great shock, and it was an even greater shock for
Picasso When I showed it to him Braques
39
Picasso, Still life With Chair Caning, May 1912,
11 x 14collage of oil, oil cloth, pasted paper
on oval canvas surrounded by rope.First Cubist
collage (not papier collé) Picassos
discontinuity principle
40
Picasso, Glass of Absinthe, spring 1914, painted
bronze with perforated silver-plated absinthe
spoon. Edition of six casts commissioned by
Picassos dealer, Kahnweiler, each painted
separately
41
(left) Braque at the front, December 17,
1914(center) Braque photographed by painter
Henri Laurens in Laurens studio, 1915 (right)
Picasso in his studio at rue Schoelcher, 1914-16
During the Cubist years, Picasso and I said
things go one another that will never be said
again . . . That no one will ever be able to
understand . . . Things that would be
incomprehensible, but that gave us great joy. .
. . All that will end with us. - Braque
42
Picasso, (left) Three Women at the Spring, 1921,
68 X 58 (right) Three Musicians, oil on
canvas, 1921, 67 x 74 After 1914 and the
end of the creative dialogue with Braque,
Picasso begins a dual-track (Representational
Synthetic Cubist) production
43
Georges Braque, Still Life, 1929
44
"Beauty is everywhere, in the arrangement of your
pots and pans, on the white wall of your kitchen,
more perhaps than in your eighteenth-century
salon or in the official museum. Fernand Léger
(French 1881-1955) Machine AestheticFernand
Léger, Woman Sewing (The Artists Mother), 1909
45
Fernand Léger, Nudes in the Forest, 1909-10, o/c,
47 x 67
46
Fernand Léger, Exit the Ballet Russe, 1915
47
Leger, The Card Players, 1917
48
Fernand Léger, The City, 1919, 77 x 99
Philadelphia MA Innumerable examples of
rupture and change crop up unexpectedly in our
visual awareness. The advertising billboard,
dictated by modern commercial needs, that
brutally cuts across a landscape is one of the
things that has most infuriated so-called men of
. good taste.
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