This program is presented at several SME technical clinics; Broaching Technology clinics, the Process Improvement Clinics and the Basic and the Advanced Gear Design & Manufacturing clinics. www.SME.org - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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This program is presented at several SME technical clinics; Broaching Technology clinics, the Process Improvement Clinics and the Basic and the Advanced Gear Design & Manufacturing clinics. www.SME.org

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Tool cost improvements are typically 15% to 20%. Similar improvements in quality and uptime. Gary Rodak, CMfgE Gary.Rodak_at_MachiningEfficiencies.com – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: This program is presented at several SME technical clinics; Broaching Technology clinics, the Process Improvement Clinics and the Basic and the Advanced Gear Design & Manufacturing clinics. www.SME.org


1
This program is presented at several SME
technical clinics Broaching Technology clinics,
the Process Improvement Clinics and the Basic and
the Advanced Gear Design Manufacturing clinics.
www.SME.org
Tool cost improvements are typically 15 to
20. Similar improvements in quality and uptime.
  • Gary Rodak, CMfgE
  • Gary.Rodak_at_MachiningEfficiencies.com
  • www.MachiningEfficiencies.com
  • Phone 734-904-4060

This program is also presented at the Michigan
Manufacturing Technology Center in Plymouth, MI
several times each year. www.MMTC.org
This presentation is best viewed in the
Powerpoint Presentation mode.
2
  • Machining Efficiencies, Inc. is dedicated to
    improving the manufacturing performance of
    machining and grinding operations.
  • We focus on improving our clients profitability
    by identifying specific corrective action that
    will reduce the process costs.
  • We transfer our knowledge of process improvement
    techniques to our clients to ensure long term
    effectiveness.
  • We accomplish this through educational seminars
    and first hand exposure to best practices.

Gary Rodak, President
3
We involve you.
  • We hold several one hour classroom reviews of
    basic machining process theory and the
    relationships between filtration, cutting fluid
    chemistry, biology, and metallurgy.
  • These sessions also cover best practices for
    machining and grinding processes, coolant
    control, filter maintenance and metallurgy.
  • We utilize your specific or familiar floor
    problems for customized training programs and
    implementation of best practices.
  • Our recommendations are reinforced with
    customized presentations and reports suitable for
    quality system audits.
  • Available follow up reviews ensure long term
    implementation of best practices and problem
    resolution.
  • We stay focused and are driven to reduce your
    cost of manufacturing.

4
Skill Enhancement Program for Engineers
Machinists
  • We introduce your Engineers and Machinists to
    practical techniques for quickly improving
    process performance.
  • We show how the worn tool indicates the process
    conditions and what may be sub-optimized
    practices.
  • The Program uses familiar tools and processes
    that benefit from the attention.
  • Simple, easy-to-create reports are used for
    follow up and for quality system audits.
  • The exposure to this problem solving technique
    will be used by the students for the rest of
    their professional career.

5
Topics addressed in the training program and how
they relate to each other
  • 9 elements of making a good part why all are
    important
  • Types of metalworking fluids and control
    parameters
  • Chemistry how additives work and what you need
    to know
  • Boundary and hydrodynamic lubrication modes
  • Orthogonal geometry in machining
  • Plane of deformation during cutting controlling
    it for efficiency
  • Microfinish how it is created and controlled at
    the cutting edge
  • Filtration how much do you really need?
  • Biological activity the impact on the machining
    process
  • Coolant system problem identification and
    resolution
  • Tool wear patterns and how to read them to
    improve the process
  • Tool wear patterns cause and cure with
    broaches, inserts, hobs, shapers, reamers,
    drills, etc.
  • Tool life improvement and practical techniques
    (customized program)
  • Tool condition and sharpening techniques
    (customized program)
  • The costs of manufacturing at a specific point in
    the total process

6
Following are some slides taken from the
presentations.
Sequence of events for a plant wide process
improvement program. Overview
  • Identify top 15 to 20 high cost tools or high
    volume tools
  • General audience classroom training
  • Identify tool and coolant system issues
  • Investigate issues and root causes
  • Present findings, reports and recommendations
  • Incorporate improvements into standard operating
    procedures
  • Follow up key issues and findings
  • A plant wide program has the greatest impact on
    costs and involves the greatest number of
    individuals who can affect the processes.

7
Technical Program
  • A Practical Approach to Improving your Machining
    Operations
  • Coolant Action in the Cutting Zone
  • Tool Wear Patterns
  • How to Adjust the Process for Improvement
  • Troubleshooting Coolants in Central Systems

8
Machine a better chip.. It is the core of
your business
  • 1. Reduce the cost of manufacturing
  • A. With greater tool life. (Lower tooling costs)
  • B. With less tool change set ups. (Less downtime)
  • 2. Improve the surface finish during the
    machining processes.
  • A. More accurate form generation.
  • B. Attain tighter tolerances.
  • C. Better subsequent processes. (Better
    coating, assembly, etc.)
  • D. Less residual compressive stresses in parts.

9
The Costs of Manufacturing
All FIVE disciplines are related and mutually
influential
Tools Metallurgy Coolants
Filtration Machine
10
Identify ALL the Problem(s) with your central
system(Poor tool life or wheel life are used as
examples here.)
  • A. Odor
  • B. Rust and Stain
  • C. Loss of filter efficiency
  • D. Poor emulsification
  • E. Residual films
  • F. Dermatitis
  • G. Foaming
  • H. Poor tool life or wheel life
  • I. Poor microfinish
  • J. Poor part size control
  • K. Paint removal
  • L. Smoke or excessive misting
  • M. Clinkering of chips or swarf
  • N. Fungus
  • O. Seals or V Belts
  • P. Chip nests (stringy chips)

11
H. Poor tool life/wheel life (These 20
influential components are investigated.)
  • 1. Concentration control
  • 2. Microorganisms/fungus
  • 3. Biocide levels
  • 4. Wrong product choice
  • 5. Improper speeds and feeds
  • 6. Wrong tool material choice or wheel material
    choice
  • 7. Improper resharpening or redressing
  • 8. Misdirected coolant flow
  • 9. Pump sucking air
  • 10. Restricted coolant flow
  • 11. Foam
  • 12. Contamination by hydraulic fluids, way oils
  • 13. Contamination by floor cleaners or machine
    cleaners
  • 14. Incorrect tool design/wheel application
  • 15. Incorrect metallurgy of parts
  • 16. Part fixturing
  • 17. Part gauging
  • 18. Prior part processing
  • 19. Filter malfunction
  • 20. Machine/spindle vibration

12
All of the failure modes are documented with
microphotographs for future reference. There are
four more failure modes associated with
broaching, hobbing and other similar processes.
They are not included in consideration of the
document file size.
Failure Modes of inserts
  1. Built Up Edge phenomenon
  2. Chipping Wear
  3. Flaking
  4. Spalling
  5. Fracture
  6. Flank / Nose / Face Wear
  7. Notching Wear
  8. Thermal Cracking (Shock) (Fatigue)
  9. Crater Wear (Diffusion Wear)
  10. Deformation Wear
  11. Cobalt Leaching

13
Chipping Wear Identification Causes
  • Identification
  • Ragged edge on insert
  • Poor (streaked) surface finish on parts
  • Irregular wear
  • Leads to catastrophic tool failure (masked cause)
  • Causes
  • Excessive loads on tool
  • Built Up Edge (BUE)
  • Intermittent contact with hard inclusions
  • Machine or part fixture vibration
  • Lack of rigidity of tool holder setup
  • Improper selection of insert geometry / substrate
    / coating
  • Re-circulated fines / micro particles in coolant
  • If coated, coating may be too thick

14
We tailor the cure to the specific issues
requiring improvement.
Chipping Wear Cure
  • Cure
  • Aim coolant properly
  • Reduce Tramp Oil content in coolant
  • Use coolant with Extreme Pressure (EP) additives
  • Make sure the machine or fixture does not vibrate
  • Balance spindle
  • Strengthen tool holder
  • Select insert with high cobalt content
  • Decrease feed rate
  • De-scale surface of part
  • Improve filtration positive barrier
  • Change coating (if used) or eliminate
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