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Parent & Family Education: From Face-To-Face to Online Delivery

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From Face-To-Face to Online Delivery Betty Cooke, Ph.D., CFLE Michael Jerpbak, Ph.D., CFLE December 1, 2006 Introductions Who we are Who you are and why you are here ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Parent & Family Education: From Face-To-Face to Online Delivery


1
Parent Family Education From Face-To-Face to
Online Delivery
  • Betty Cooke, Ph.D., CFLE
  • Michael Jerpbak, Ph.D., CFLE
  • December 1, 2006

2
Introductions
  • Who we are
  • Who you are and why you are here
  • Apprehensions and/or concerns about online parent
    and family education

3
Apprehensions About Online
  • Accessibility (technology and language)
  • Some prefer face-to-face
  • Isolation
  • Decline in traditional face-to-face communities
    and social structures
  • Confidentiality
  • Inaccurate and incomplete information
  • Technology can be intoxicating
  • Technology is not a panacea for all ills and
    needs
  • Might distract us from emotional connections

4
Parent Education Online?
  • Number of websites grew from 50 in 1992 to over
    8.7 million in 2002
  • On a typical day, more people go online for
    medical advice than visit a health care provider
    (approximately 6 million per day)
  • A search on Google for the word parenting
    yielded nearly 5 million sites in 2003
  • A variety of online parenting education is
    currently available. Participants report the
    following
  • positive social support
  • developing close personal relationships
  • a sense of community
  • learning important parenting skills
  • a decrease in stress
  • a reduction in problem behavior with children

Long, N. (2004). e-Parenting. In M. Hoghughi N.
Long (Eds.), Handbook of parenting Theory and
research for practice, (pp. 369-379). Thousand
Oaks, CA Sage.
5
New Parents New Paradigm
  • Computers arent technology
  • The Internet is better than TV
  • Reality is no longer real
  • Doing is more important than knowing
  • Learning more like Nintendo than logic
  • Multitasking is life
  • Typing is preferred to handwriting
  • Staying connected is essential
  • Zero tolerance for delays
  • Consumer and creator are blurred

Oblinger, D. (2003). Boomers, Gen-Xers,
Millennials Understanding the new student.
Educause Review, 38 (4), 36-40. Retrieved
November 20, 2006, from www.educause.edu/ir/libra
ry/pdf/ERM0342.pdf
6
Barriers to Face-To-Face
  • Transportation
  • Childcare
  • Scheduling challenges
  • Work and life balance
  • Lack of local availability (e.g., rural areas)
  • Lack of variety for non-traditional audiences
  • Costly and inflexible
  • Marginalization of participants

7
From Face-to-Face to Online at the University of
Minnesota
  • Overview of process
  • Overview of current program
  • Feedback from students

8
(No Transcript)
9
Student Feedback
  • I really enjoyed taking the class on-line. It
    was more interactive than I expected and much
    easier (technologically) once I got the hang of
    it. I really enjoyed the discussions and the
    chats. The readings were excellent and
    everything tied in together nicely (the
    discussion and chat questions, the readings and
    the assignments). I liked having a variety of
    learning methods (video, lecture, readings, and
    discussion).

10
Top 10 Lessons Learned
  • More potential in online delivery is evident than
    initially thought.
  • Students are initially apprehensive, but learn to
    prefer online delivery.
  • Relationships can be built online. Also, students
    meeting online may make efforts to meet in
    person, if feasible. Online may lead to
    face-to-face relationships.
  • It levels the playing field the quiet person
    has an opportunity to express himself/herself,
    prejudices are minimized, etc. It may be
    disadvantageous for some learning styles (e.g.,
    reflective learners).
  • Complex concepts and ways of knowing and doing
    are challenging to deliver online and in danger
    of being oversimplified into sound bites and
    quick fixes. Requires thoughtful preparation
    or lecture notes and mini-lectures.

11
More Lessons Learned
  • Structure and clear expectations need to be set
    for the students and the instructor (e.g., how
    long is enough for continuing an online dialogue,
    how quickly and often instructor will respond to
    email, etc.).
  • Excellent technical support for online delivery
    is essential.
  • Small details are magnified online and need to be
    thought about prior to beginning a course (e.g.,
    readings, transitions, URLs, dates, etc.).
  • Educators need to check frequently for
    student/participant understanding because
    meanings of words vary and concepts can be
    misunderstood or misconstrued.
  • Directions and delivery of information as well as
    feedback need to be very specific and consistent.

12
Implications for Practice
  • Openness to the use of technology-driven services
  • Integration into traditional services
  • Helping parents utilize technology effectively
  • Developed with parent friendliness in mind
    (visually appealing, easy to use, address
    specific needs and preferences, allow interaction
    with experiential feedback).
  • Grounded in current research
  • Flexible enough to change as technology advances

Long, N. (2004). e-Parenting. In M. Hoghughi N.
Long (Eds.), Handbook of parenting Theory and
research for practice, (pp. 369-379). Thousand
Oaks, CA Sage.
13
The Future
  • It is anticipated that in the future the use of
    computer technology and the Internet (or later
    versions) in the home will be as common as the
    use of telephones and televisions are today (p.
    372).
  • As electronic technologies become increasingly
    part of our society it will become more difficult
    to think about parenting, and especially
    parenting services, in isolation of electronic
    technology (p. 375).
  • Perhaps the most important issue we face is not
    how technology will change but how we manage the
    change itself (p. 375).

Long, N. (2004). e-Parenting. In M. Hoghughi N.
Long (Eds.), Handbook of parenting Theory and
research for practice, (pp. 369-379). Thousand
Oaks, CA Sage.
14
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