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Desert Biomes

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Title: Desert Biomes


1
Desert Biomes
  • Amy Busch, Amber Reed, Becky Stahl

2
Part I
  • Becky Stahl

3
Biotic Abiotic Features
  • Abiotic Sand, Temperature (The temperature in
    the summer ranges from 120 degrees Fahrenheit to
    130 degrees Fahrenheit. At night, during the
    winter, frost covers the sand). Water (Lack
    thereof, 5 inches of water/year), Light.
  • Biotic
  • Plants Barrel Cactus, Chain Fruit Cholla,
    Crimson Hedgehog Cactus, Pancake Prickly Pear
    Cactus.
  • Animals Bobcat, Fennec Fox, Bighorn sheep,
    Jerboa, Coyote, Kangaroo Rat, Camel, Thorny Devil.

4
Symbiotic Relationships
  • Parasitism The Pilostyle embeds itself into a
    host plant and causes the plant to develop tiny
    red buds.
  • Predator-Prey Dingoes eat rabbits. Lizards eat
    flies. Snakes eat rats. Etc, etc

5
Tropic Levels
6
Cycles
  • The cycles dont change much from other
    biomesDeserts have less water

7
Limiting Factors
  • Habitat Destruction competition both limit the
    amount of organisms that can survive in a desert
    area.

8
Succession
  • Temperature, human intervention, climate are
    factors that could severely affect life in
    deserts. Any change in these current situations
    could be catastrophic to all organisms.

9
Part II
  • Amber Reed

10
Dingoes
  • Dingoes fill the niche of the predators.
  • They are mostly like the wild dogs and wolves
    found all over the world.
  • There are many dingoes found in Australia, which
    is why humans may consider them pests.
  • They have adapted teeth, claws, and social skills
    that allow them to either live in a pack of up to
    ten, or like typical males, live on their own.
  • Dingoes mainly have a diet of small game, such as
    rabbits, rodents, birds, and lizards, but they
    will also eat fruits and plants. Among those they
    have also been known to scavenge from humans much
    like a domesticated dog will go through the
    garbage.
  • Their main competitor for food would be humans.
    Australians have created the dingo fence to
    keep the dingoes from eating their herds.

11
Wallabies
  • Wallabies fill the niche of prey.
  • They are basically a smaller version of
    kangaroos.
  • Some species of wallabies are considered pests
    and have been moved to New Zealand.
  • They have adaptations of pouches to carry their
    young after they are born to continue growing.
    They have powerful hind legs to bound along. They
    can also use their legs in defense. They also
    have srong tails used for gripping.
  • They are herbivores, which means they only eat
    plants and other vegetation.
  • Their main copetition is each other.

12
Old Man Cactus
13
Old Man Cactus Cont.
14
Plant
15
Plant Cont.
16
Part III
  • Amy Busch

17
Human Interferences
  • In the Yucca Mountains in Nevada, a permanent
    radioactive waste site is almost established.
  • These materials would need to be stored for at
    least 1,000 yrs.
  • Obviously, radioactive material is not good for
    the surrounding areas or animals that inhabit the
    area.
  • Radioactive materials can cause death or cancer
    in any animals or humans that are affected.
  • There are other temporary waste sites now, and
    even though they may some day all be taken to the
    Yucca site, the US produces a lot of radioactive
    material right now theres about 50,000 tons of
    it

18
Global Warming
  • Yes, even deserts are affected by Global Warming!
  • In fact, global warming affects deserts more than
    any other area in the world.
  • Deserts are already dry, hot places. Global
    Warming has only made this worse.
  • Animals that live in deserts have adapted over
    the years to survive in the harsh conditions, but
    they may not be able to adapt fast enough to keep
    up with the changing climate. On the other hand,
    they may be the only ones to survive in future
    deserts that will form due to Global Warming.
  • Unfortunately, theres not much to be done to
    prevent these changes.

19
Desert Protection Campaign
  • Mission Statement
  • To prevent the development of The Worlds Largest
    Garbage Dump in the Eagle Mountains.
  • They also hope to prevent Metropolitan Water
    District of Southern California desert water
    storage projects from contaminating and
    depleting precious desert aquifers.
  • They aim to achieve their goal by working with
    government agencies, environmental organizations,
    and desert communities to restore 29,775 acres of
    desert land.

20
Pictures!!
21
More Pictures _
22
A camel with a hat, for your viewing pleasure P
23
Bibliography
  • http//animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mamm
    als/dingo.html
  • http//www.independent.co.uk/environment/desert-li
    fe-threatened-by-climate-change-and-human-exploita
    tion-481116.html
  • http//www.redorbit.com/news/science/883209/manage
    rs_blamed_in_yucca_controversy/index.html
  • http//www.uow.edu.au/eng/phys/nukeweb/fuel_types.
    html
  • http//www.wadingo.com/abassadors/lyn_watson.htm
  • http//www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/artic
    le/2009/03/03/AR2009030303638.html
  • http//www.ccaej.org/2006/Campaigns/desert/desert.
    html
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