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THE ROAD TO COLLEGE STARTS HERE A College: Making It Happen

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THE ROAD TO COLLEGE STARTS HERE A College: Making It Happen presentation for Middle School students and their parents, sponsored by Cal-SOAP. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: THE ROAD TO COLLEGE STARTS HERE A College: Making It Happen


1
THE ROAD TO COLLEGESTARTS HERE
  • A College Making It Happen presentation for
    Middle School students and their parents,
    sponsored by Cal-SOAP.

2
Subjects to be discussed
  • The student role
  • The parent/guardian role
  • Support and resources
  • The five systems of higher education in
    California
  • Choosing a college that is right for you
  • Making middle school coursework count
  • The transition to high school
  • Financial aid resources

3
THE ROAD TO COLLEGE
  • IN PERSPECTIVE

4
Why go to college?
  • Greater and more diverse career options
  • Personal and educational growth
  • It pays off

5
TIPS The student role
  • 1. Crack the books
  • Strong grades and a competitive GPA are habits
    that must begin in middle school.
  • 2. Set your goals
  • Which colleges interest you?
  • What majors will you consider?
  • Do you have any career objectives in mind?
  • 3. Make a plan
  • How will you reach your goals?
  • What kind of GPA do you need?
  • What classes will you take in high school?
  • What kind of extracurricular activities will you
    pursue?

6
TIPS The student role
  • 4. Do your research
  • Explore possible college and career choices
  • Online research www.collegeboard.com (to be
    discussed)
  • Support at school counselors, teachers, outreach
    organizations
  • Advice at home parents, siblings, extended
    family
  • 5. Stay motivated
  • Its never too early to prepare for college. It
    will keep you motivated!
  • Choose friends that share the same goals.
  • 6. Talk to your parents
  • Discuss your goals and plans with your parents
    they can help!
  • Consider possible high school, college, and
    career choices together.

7
TIPS The parent/guardian role
8
TIPS The parent/guardian role
  • 1. Prioritize your childs education
  • Create a family calendar in order to schedule
    homework, study, extracurricular, and
    recreational times.
  • Be aware of school deadlines in order to keep
    your child on track.
  • 2. Celebrate achievements
  • Regularly check report cards and discuss progress
    with your childs teachers so you can celebrate
    good grades and consistent effort.
  • Remember, your childs motivation is the most
    important guide on the road to college.
  • 3. Be involved
  • Help choose and plan your childs extracurricular
    activities.
  • Be aware of your childs circle of friends.

9
TIPS The parent/guardian role
  • 4. Encourage good habits
  • Calendars, planners, schedules
  • A designated study timeeveryday
  • Extracurricular activities
  • 5. Talk
  • NOW is the time for the college talk.
  • Remember, colleges will consider your childs
    work from day one of high school to graduation
    day.
  • Ask questions
  • What are your childs career interests? Favorite
    subjects? Weakest subjects?
  • Seek resources
  • Look for school and community resources in order
    to build a support network for your childs
    success

10
The college talk beginsNOW!
  • We will now take a 30 second break
  • PARENTS/GUARDIANS Turn to your students and ask
    them one or all of the following questions
  • 1) Where do you want to go to college (i.e.
    possible campuses, cities, states)?
  • 2) What careers are you interested in?
  • 3) What are your strongest and weakest subjects
    in school?

11
Building a support network
  • The College Team Whos in it?
  • The student, of course!
  • Family matters parents/guardians, siblings,
    extended family
  • Good friends with shared goals
  • School staff teachers, counselors
  • Local outreach organizationslike Cal-SOAP!

12
Seek resourcesbecause we all need a little help
  • Encourage your child to join an after school
    program that supports a college-going culture.
  • Finding a program
  • School talk to teachers, counselors, and
    principals
  • Community organizations i.e. libraries,
    recreational centers, religious institutions
  • Research programs and advice online with the
    After School Alliance www.afterschoolalliance.org
    (Click on After School in My Community)
  • Seek the services of educational outreach
    organizations that may be present in your middle
    schools or high schools.
  • Cal-SOAP, TRIO, UPWARD BOUND, GEAR-UP, EAOP, etc.

13
DISCLAIMER The times, they are a-changin
  • The most important tip of all for students and
    parents
  • Do your research and remain up-to-date with
    college requirements.
  • Recent changes (announced in 2009) have affected
  • The UC testing requirement
  • The UC Eligibility in the Local Context GPA range
  • The impaction of majors in select CSU campuses
  • The Transfer Agreement Guarantee program at the
    CSU
  • Tuition fees at all California public campuses,
    including community colleges
  • Disclaimer All requirements discussed today,
    apply only today. It is your responsibility to
    remain aware.
  • Lets learn about some colleges

14
THE 5 SYSTEMS OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN CALIFORNIA
  • AND THEIR REQUIREMENTS

15
Requirements A cheat sheet for college acronyms
  • GPA- Grade Point Average
  • Colleges will ask for either the students
    weighted (extra points for honors/AP courses) or
    unweighted GPA
  • AP- Advanced Placement
  • Optional courses in high school that offer
    college credit, if students pass a final
    examination
  • A-G
  • A curriculum of University of California (UC)
    approved general education courses, listed A-G,
    that must be completed in high school for college
    entrance
  • Standardized Tests
  • SAT- Scholastic Aptitude Test (a.k.a. SAT
    Reasoning Exam)
  • ACT- American College Test
  • Most universities require scores from either the
    SAT or ACT
  • Whats the difference?
  • SAT Subject
  • Subject-specific exams that some private
    universities may require or recommend (i.e.
    Spanish, US History, Literature, etc.)

16
University of California
  • Stats
  • 10 campuses
  • Research-based
  • Approximately 27,000 per year for total fees
  • Basic admission requirements
  • A-G coursework
  • 3.0 GPA
  • SAT or ACT
  • SAT Subject Update Beginning with the senior
    class of 2012, the SAT Subject exams are no
    longer required (but recommended)
  • Comprehensive/Holistic Review
  • Important factors extracurricular activities,
    leadership roles, community service, etc.
  • Transfer Agreement Guarantee for CA Community
    College students

17
California State University
  • Stats
  • 23 campuses
  • Traditional university setting
  • Approximately 15,000 per year for total fees
  • Basic admission requirements
  • A-G coursework
  • Meet minimum eligibility index (a number derived
    from an equation that considers both GPA and
    SAT/ACT scores)
  • SAT or ACT
  • Transfer Agreement Guarantee for CA Community
    College students

18
California Community College
  • Stats
  • 112 campuses
  • Transfer, Associates Degree, vocational, and
    certificate programs available
  • Approximately 2,000 per year for total fees
  • Basic admission requirements
  • High school diploma or GED or
  • 18 years old
  • (Note High school students can enroll in
    community college classes with high schools
    approval.)

19
Private Colleges
  • Stats
  • Many, many campuses (i.e. University of San
    Diego, Point Loma Nazarene University, Stanford
    University, National University)
  • Campus settings/focuses vary widely
  • Costs vary widely
  • Basic admission requirements
  • Vary, but generally accept courses covered by the
    A-G curriculum
  • GPA varies, but generally selective
  • Testing requirements vary, but generally require
    SAT or ACT
  • (SAT Subject exams may be required or
    recommended, depending on campus and major)
  • Transfer requirements and programs vary
  • Generally practice Holistic Review
  • Extracurricular activities, leadership roles, and
    community service considered

20
Vocational/Technical Institutions
  • Stats
  • Many campuses, depending on field of study (i.e.
    Art Institute of San Diego, FIDM, Paul Mitchell
    School, Universal Technical Institute, Concorde
    Career Institute)
  • Degrees and/or certificates available
  • Costs vary widely
  • Basic admission requirements
  • Admission requirements vary widely. Research
    application procedures at each program of
    interest.
  • (Note Many vocational programs are available at
    community colleges for a much lesser cost.)

21
CHOOSING A COLLEGE THAT IS RIGHT FOR YOU
  • COLLEGE EXPLORATION BEGINS TODAY

22
Make-or-break criteria
  • A few, basic factors to consider when researching
    college campuses
  • Institution type (public, private, vocational)
  • Majors/minors offered
  • Campus/enrollment size (large vs. small classes)
  • Campus reputation
  • Geography (urban/rural in-state/out-of-state)
  • Distance from home
  • Housing (available/guaranteed?)
  • Campus resources (libraries, computers)
  • Costs (tuition, books, room and board)
  • Financial aid offered

23
Make-or-break criteria
  • Some more factors to consider
  • Religious affiliation
  • Gender-specific vs. co-ed
  • Student body diversity
  • Extracurricular activities offered
  • Social life (sororities, fraternities, clubs)
  • Tips for successful research
  • Begin to visit campuses as early as possible.
  • Dont rely on name recognition/hype. Find your
    best fit!
  • Dont pick campuses just because your friends are
    applying. Make your own decisions!
  • Dont rule out colleges because of cost.
    Financial aid is available.
  • Online research College Board Profiles and
    Matchmaker www.collegeboard.com

24
MAKING MIDDLE SCHOOL COUNT
  • PREPARING EARLY FOR COLLEGE

25
Did you know?
  • There are two courses that middle school students
    can take for A-G credit NOW
  • Algebra 1
  • Foreign Language
  • Spanish, French, Cantonese, etc.
  • BUT, you must earn at least an A or B in
    order to prevent repeating the course in high
    school.

26
Middle School Checklist
  • 6th Grade
  • Take challenging classes to help prepare yourself
    for high school
  • Begin the college talk with your parents
  • Start a calendar of homework and activities
  • Teach yourself good study habits now!
  • Encourage your parents to start saving for your
    college education
  • 7th Grade
  • Enroll in Algebra and a foreign language they
    count for A-G credit!
  • Perform well on standardized tests theyre good
    practice for the CAHSEE and SAT/ACT
  • If you need help, seek a counselor/teacher/tutor
    NOW dont wait!
  • 8th Grade
  • Ask your parent/guardian to help you research
    colleges and careers www.collegeboard.com
  • Research financial aid options with your parents
    www.fafsa4caster.ed.gov
  • Talk to your parents about choosing a high school
  • Become involved in school or community activities
    that will let you explore career interests

27
THE WONDERFUL TRANSITION TO HIGH SCHOOL
  • PLANNING YOUR NEXT FOUR YEARS

28
The notorious A-G
  • In order to find a unique list of A-G courses
    approved for your high school, visit the UCOP
    Pathways website https//doorways.ucop.edu/list/

29
Five tips for high school success
  • 1. Make sure you take a healthy number of A-G
    courses every year in addition to your high
    school requirements and electives. Passing may
    mean a C
  • 2. Show progress and diversity in your
    coursework.
  • If you excel in a subject, take its Honors/AP
    level.
  • 3. Talk to your counselor every semester!
  • The big question to ask Am I on track to apply
    for ____ college(s)?
  • 4. Work on your application builders
  • Extracurricular activities clubs, sports,
    student government
  • Leadership roles
  • Community service
  • 5. Balance your school work and social life with
    college preparation, i.e.
  • SAT/ACT preparation and examination
  • College research
  • Scholarship searches and applications

30
FINANCIAL AID RESOURCES
  • (PARENTS LISTEN CLOSELY!)

31
Money, money, money
  • Government grants/loans
  • Apply for the FAFSA by March 2 of your senior
    year in high school
  • Campus-based grants and scholarships
  • Apply with your admission application and/or once
    enrolled in college
  • Scholarships You should begin applying in middle
    school and not stop till you have a college
    degree!
  • Online search engines www.fastweb.com
    www.cashe.com www.collegeboard.com
    www.scholarships.com www.maldef.org
  • School/community resources counselors, teachers,
    peers, career centers, public libraries,
    community organizations, etc.
  • Financial aid is available for everyone!
    Undocumented students, foster youth, and
    veterans dependents should talk to a counselor
    or Cal-SOAP representative in high school.

32
Money, money, money
  • Tips for scholarship successStart NOW
  • Apply for as many scholarships as possible
  • Dont neglect smaller, local scholarships
  • Bridge multiple applications
  • Recycle, recycle, recycle
  • Paint a strong self-portrait in scholarship
    essays
  • Keep a written personal inventory
  • Prioritize school work and class time
  • Stick with it

33
The road to collegestarts here, today
  • When you need directions, contact Cal-SOAP
  • Online www.sandiegocalsoap.com
  • Phone (858) 569-1866
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