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Reach Out and Read Colorado

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... suburbs more diverse. By Burt Hubbard. The Denver Post. Joe Amon, Denver Post ' ... Muslim Women's Association and The Faith Community Action Team (Denver) ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Reach Out and Read Colorado


1
Reach Out and Read Colorado Supporting
Immigrant and Refugee Families Initiative Immigra
nt Integration Joe Wismann-Horther Spring
Institute for Intercultural Learning
2
Changing Demographics Key information
source Migration Policy Institute
http//www.migrationinformation.org/datahub/state.
cfm?IDCO
3
The term foreign born refers to people residing
in the United States at the time of the census
who were not US citizens at birth. The
foreign-born population includes naturalized
citizens, lawful permanent immigrants, refugees
and asylees, legal nonimmigrants (including those
on student, work, or other temporary visas), and
persons residing in the country without
authorization. By comparison, the term native
refers to people residing in the United States
who were US citizens in one of three categories
1) people born in one of the 50 states or the
District of Columbia 2) people born in United
States Insular Areas such as Puerto Rico or Guam
or 3) people who were born abroad to at least one
US citizen parent. We use the terms immigrants
and foreign born interchangeably.
4
Changing Demographics
5
US
At the national level, 1990 to 2000, the
foreign-born population increased from 19.8
million to 31.1 million, representing a 57.4
percent change.
2000 to 2007, the foreign-born population
increased from 31.1 million to 38 million,
representing a 22.3 percent change.
6
Colorado
The foreign-born population of Colorado grew by
160 percent between 1990 and 2000. Between 1990
and 2000, the foreign-born population in Colorado
increased from 142,434 to 369,903, representing a
159.7 percent change.
Between 2000 and 2007, the foreign-born
population in Colorado changed from 369,903 to
485,170, representing a change of 31.2 percent.
7
Colorado
In 2007, 10.0 percent of Colorado's total
population were immigrants, compared to 8.6
percent in 2000 and 4.3 percent in 1990.
US
At the national level, the foreign-born
population represented 12.6 percent of the total
population in 2007, compared to 11.1 percent in
2000 and 7.9 percent in 1990.
8
Colorado
17th out of 51 Size of the foreign-born
population, 2000 16th out of 51 Size of the
foreign-born population, 2007
16th out of 51 Percent foreign born in the total
population, 2000 17th out of 51 Percent foreign
born in the total population, 2007
9
12th out of 51 Numeric change in the
foreign-born population, 1990 to 2000 16th out
of 51 Numeric change in the foreign-born
population, 2000 to 2007
8th out of 51 Percent change in the
foreign-born population, 1990-2000 22nd out
of 51 Percent change in the foreign-born
population, 2000-2007
10
Size of the foreign-born, limited English
proficient (LEP) population, 200716 out of
51 Percent of immigrants persons who are LEP,
2007 9 out of 51 Share of the foreign-born
population with a bachelors or higher degree,
2007 36 out of 51 Share of the foreign-born
population with less than a high school diploma,
2007 14 out of 51
11
denver and the west Denver gets whiter suburbs
more diverse By Burt Hubbard The Denver Post
Joe Amon, Denver Post
12
Being an immigrant, it will be a chronic illness
for the rest of your life, said Dr. Veronica
Svetaz, a physician from Argentina who works at
one of Hennepins neighborhood clinics. You
dont belong anywhere anymore. Dr. Veronica
Svetaz, Hennepin County New York Times series,
Remade in America, A series about the newest
immigrants and their impact on American
institutions
13
SIRFI Phase One
2000 - 2004
  • 23 organizations provide mental health or
    cultural adjustment services to immigrants and
    refugees.

14
SIRFI Phase One CYCLE I GRANTEES Crawford Family
Resource Center (Aurora Public Schools)
ECCOS Family Center and Centro
Bienestar (Denver) Family Visitor Program
(Glenwood) Hmong American Association of
Colorado (Westminister)
15
  • SIRFI Phase One
  • CYCLE II GRANTEES
  • Family Ties West Family Center
  • (Olathe)
  • Asian Pacific Development Center
  • (Colorado Springs)
  • Muslim Womens Association and The Faith
    Community Action Team (Denver)
  • Focus Points Family Resource Center
  • (Denver)

16
Aha! Moment
17
Immigrant Integration Community-Based Grant
Simply put, immigrant integration can be seen as
a two-way street that involves adaptation on the
part of immigrants themselves and on the part of
the broader or receiving community.
18
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19
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20
Phase I
Phase II
21
SIRFI GRANTEES
Phase I (beginning in 2004) Aspen to Parachute
Region Boulder County El Paso County Gunnison
County Lake County City of Littleton Mesa
County Morgan County Pueblo County Summit County
Phase II (beginning in 2006) City and County of
Denver Cities of Greeley and Evans Commerce
City La Plata County Montrose and Delta
Counties Original Aurora Routt and Moffat
Counties San Luis Valley Telluride Region
22
Immigrant Integration in Schools Project
The Colorado Trust and Colorado Department of
Education
Immigrant Integration Resource Guide Support
23
Aurora Public Denver Public Schools Gunnison
Watershed School District Montrose County School
District St. Vrain Valley School
District Steamboat Springs School District Summit
School District Telluride School District Weld
Count School District 6
24
Communicating Across Languages
  • Speak more slowly than usual, but do not use
    unnatural language.
  • Be conscious of the beginning and ending of
    sentences, speaking as distinctly as possible.
  • Pause frequently to give the listener adequate
    time to process the language and content.
  • Watch for body language which may aid the
    communication or indicate confusion.
  • Check for understanding by active listening or
    paraphrasing what the speaker has said.

25
Communicating Across Languages
  • Provide adequate space for the communication do
    not rush the listening-and-speaking flow of
    conversation.
  • When there is uncertainty regarding the
    communication, reframe the sentence, using
    alternate words or phrases.
  • Avoid idioms, slang or jargon. Define acronyms
    and abbreviations.
  • Demonstrate, use visuals, and reinforce with
    written material whenever possible.
  • Assume communication can occur. Handle your
    fear.

26
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27
However, if most of our hypothetical individual
futures don't look quite so lavish, as a nation
we have two not-so-secret weapons that, managed
correctly and given a little luck, could allow us
to remain at the top of the heap for a long time
to come technological innovation and immigration.
Thursday, Mar. 26, 2009 The End of Excess Is
This Crisis Good for America? By Kurt Andersen
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