Effects of Caffeine on Basal Metabolic Rate and Metabolism of Fat and Carbohydrate During Moderate Exercise - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Effects of Caffeine on Basal Metabolic Rate and Metabolism of Fat and Carbohydrate During Moderate Exercise

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Effects of Caffeine on Basal Metabolic Rate and Metabolism of Fat and Carbohydrate During Moderate Exercise By: Adam Michalik Introduction The purpose of this study ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Effects of Caffeine on Basal Metabolic Rate and Metabolism of Fat and Carbohydrate During Moderate Exercise


1
Effects of Caffeine on Basal Metabolic Rate and
Metabolism of Fat and Carbohydrate During
Moderate Exercise
  • By Adam Michalik

2
Introduction
  • The purpose of this study was
  • 1) To analyze the effects of caffeine on basal
    metabolic rate (BMR).
  • 2) To analyze the effect caffeine has on the
    percentage of calories burned as fat versus
    calories burned as carbohydrate during moderate
    exercise.

3
Hypotheses
  • There will be a significant increase in resting
    energy expenditure when caffeine is consumed
    prior to measurement of basal metabolic rate.
  • The percentage of calories burned as fat will
    increase while percentage of calories burned as
    carbohydrate will decrease during moderate
    exercise.
  • Decreasing RQ value towards 0.70

4
Methods
  • Two separate trials consisting of a basal
    metabolic rate test along with two five minute
    exercise periods, one at 2.5 mph and the other at
    4.0 mph.
  • BMR Test Protocol
  • Trial one - only water
  • Trial two - consume approx. 300 mg of caffeine
    1-1.5 hours before arriving to the HHP lab.
  • Expired air was analyzed for both tests to
    determine BMR, BMR RQ, exercise HR, exercise
    oxygen consumption, and exercise RQ for both
    caffeinated and non-caffeinated states.

5
Methods
  • Equipment used
  • VO2 metabolic measurement system
  • Motor driven treadmill
  • Statistical Analysis
  • Multiple Paired T-tests

6
Descriptive Statistics
7
Results BMR and RQ
8
Results Heart Rate
9
Results Oxygen Consumption
10
Discussion
  • The comparison between caffeinated and
    non-caffeinated exercise HR _at_ 2.5 mph resulted in
    a significant difference (Plt0.05).
  • Bell claimed that HR increased over time, and
    values were further increased after caffeine
    ingestion. 2
  • Caffeine tended to produce higher values for BMR,
    exercise HR, and exercise oxygen consumption at
    2.5 mph.
  • Acheson reports that caffeine/coffee stimulates
    the metabolic rate in both control and obese
    individuals. 1
  • Caffeine produced a small but significant
    increase in VO2 after 15 minutes of exercise for
    both users and nonusers of caffeine.2

11
Discussion
  • Exercise oxygen consumption at 4.0 showed slight
    decrease with caffeine (0.25 mL/kg.min)
  • 1.4 decrease
  • Exercise and resting RQ increased while
    caffeinated
  • Data suggests increased CHO utilization
  • Research
  • Acheson increased plasma FFAs result in
    increased fat oxidation. This is masked through
    alteration of RQ by hyperventilation.
  • Cox inability to measure substrate utilization

12
Summary
  • Caffeine significantly increased exercise HR _at_
    2.5 mph
  • Caffeine produced higher values for BMR, exercise
    HR, and exercise oxygen consumption at 2.5 mph
  • Not significant
  • Caffeine decreased exercise O2 consumption _at_ 4.0
    mph
  • Not significant
  • Exercise and resting RQ increased with caffeine
    use
  • Not significant
  • For the future
  • Standardization of testing, caffeine consumption,
    more subjects

13
Acknowledgements
  • A special thanks to
  • Dr. Carey
  • Subjects

14
References
  • 1) Acheson, K. J., Zahorska-Markiewicz, B.,
    Pittet, Ph., Anantharam, K., Jequier, E. (1980).
    Caffeine and coffee their influence on metabolic
    rate and substrate utilization in normal weight
    and obese individuals. The American Journal of
    Clinical Nutrition, 33, 989-997.
  • 2) Bell, Douglas G., McLellan, Tom M. (2002).
    Exercise endurance 1, 3, and 6 h after caffeine
    ingestion in caffeine users and nonusers. Journal
    of Applied Physiology, 93, 1227-1234.
  • 3) Cox, G. R., Desbrow, B., Montgomery, P. G.,
    Anderson, M. E., Bruce, C. R., Macrides T. A.,
    Martin D. T., Moquin, A., Roberts, A., Hawley, J.
    A., Burke, L. M. (2002). Effect of different
    protocols of caffeine intake on metabolism and
    endurance performance. Journal of Applied
    Physiology, 93, 990-999.
  • 4) Haldi, J., Bachmann, G., Ensor, C., Wynn, W.
    (1940). The Effect of Various Amounts of
    Caffeine on the Gaseous Exchange and the
    Respiratory Quotient in Man. The Journal of
    Nutrition, 307-320.
  • 5) Hallal, Janice C. (1986). Caffeine Is It
    Hazardous to Your Patients Health? The American
    Journal of Nursing, 84(4), 422-425
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