Population Geography I (Demography) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Population Geography I (Demography) PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 3d14e3-ZWM2N



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Population Geography I (Demography)

Description:

Population Geography I (Demography) The Where and Why of Population Density (Concentration) Distribution (Location) Demographics (Characteristics) Dynamics (Over time) – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:203
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 65
Provided by: peopleUwe1
Learn more at: http://people.uwec.edu
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Population Geography I (Demography)


1
Population Geography I(Demography)
  • The Where and Why of Population
  • Density (Concentration)
  • Distribution (Location)
  • Demographics (Characteristics)
  • Dynamics (Over time)
  • Interpretation

2
Interpretation
  • FACT
  • According to the World Health Organization (WHO),
    the death rate in the United States due to heart
    disease is approximately 3x higher than in Haiti
    and over 5.5x higher than in Angola.
  • This is true because

3
Deaths Due to Other Causes
Tuberculosis Deaths (per 100,000) U.S. Angola Ha
iti 0 33 71 AIDS Deaths (per
100,000) U.S. Angola Haiti 7.3 78
83 Malaria Deaths (per 100,000) U.S. Angola
Haiti 0 150 8
4
Life Expectancy
  • U.S. Angola Haiti
  • M F M F M F
  • 75 80 40 43 59 63

5
So Remember!
  • Data is just a bunch of numbers!
  • In order to effectively use data, you MUST
  • Analyze
  • Interpret
  • Place into the right context

6
Population Density
  • Not only WHERE people are located, but the
    DISTRIBUTION (clustering or dispersion) of people
    across or within a given region
  • Measured in people per unit of area
  • People per square mile (mi2)
  • People per square kilometer (km2)
  • People per acre

7
Population Density
8
Cultural Hearths (or Cradles) of Civilization
9
Year 1
10
1500
11
1900
12
World Population Density 2010
people per square mi (mi2)
13
Population by Continents(2010)
Continent Population People/mi2 Asia 4,
157,000,000 203 Africa 1,130,000,000
65 Antarctica 0
0 Oceana/Oz/NZ 37,000,000 6.4 Europe
739,000,000 134 North America
347,000,000 32 Latin America 620,000,000
73 TOTAL 7,000,000,000 105
14
U.S. Population Densities(people/mi2)
  • Lower 48 states 95
  • NJ 1,134
  • WY 5
  • Manhattan 66,834
  • Wisconsin 99
  • Eau Claire Co. 146
  • Florence Co. 10
  • Milwaukee Co. 3885

15
World Population Densities(people/mi2)
  • Australia 7
  • Bangladesh 2261
  • Canada 8
  • Netherlands 1002
  • United States 80
  • Singapore 17,746
  • Vatican City 4,500

16
DistributionWhy do we live where we live?
17
Trans-Siberian railroadsin eastern Russia
Omsk
18
(No Transcript)
19
Demography(Population characteristics)
  • Ascribed
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Age
  • Achieved
  • Education
  • Income
  • Occupation
  • Employment
  • Etc.

20
CensusCount of population and its
characteristics
http//www.census.gov/main/www/popclock.html
  • According to the International Programs Center,
    U.S. Bureau of the Census, the total population
    of the World, projected to 3/25/13 at 1557 GMT
    (CDT5) was7,074,565,501

21
Population Statistics
  • Birth Rate (per 1,000)
  • Death Rate (per 1,000)
  • Fertility Rate (Children born/Woman)
  • Infant Mortality Rate (per 1,000)
  • Natural Increase (Births Deaths per 1,000)
  • Life Expectancy (years)

22
World Birth Rate(births per 1,000 population)
23
World Death Rate (deaths per 1,000 population)
24
Fertility Rate( of children per woman of
childbearing age)
25
Infant Mortality Rate(deaths of infants lt1 year
old)
Lack of maternal health care or child nutrition
26
Uneven locally
Red areas higher than at least 28 Third World
countries, including
  • Jamaica
  • Cuba
  • Argentina Costa Rica
  • South Korea
  • Chile
  • Malaysia
  • Panama
  • Sri Lanka
  • Taiwan
  • Uruguay

Infant Mortality Rate in Philadelphia
27
DynamicsRate of Natural Increase (RNI)
  • Births
  • - Deaths
  • RNI

28
RNI Figures ()
PERIPHERY Uganda 3.4 Niger 3.4 Mali 3.2
Burkina Faso 3.1 Senegal 2.7 Afghanistan 2.5
Iraq 2.4 Tanzania 2.0 Philippines 2.0 Hondur
as 1.9 Bolivia 1.7
SEMI-PERIPHERY Mexico 1.4 India 1.4 Brazil
1.1 CORE United States 0.5 China
0.5 France 0.4 Canada 0.2 Denmark
0.0 Hungary -0.3 Serbia
-0.5 Ukraine -0.6
29
Rates of Natural Increase(Birth Rate-Death Rate)
30
Russians get day off to procreate, then win prizes
  • The Denver Post
  • 12/24/2007
  • Moscow - A Russian region of Ulyanovsk has found
    a novel way to fight the nation's birth-rate
    crisis It has declared Sept. 12 the Day of
    Conception and for the third year running is
    giving couples time off from work to procreate.
    The hope is for a brood of babies exactly nine
    months later on Russia's national day. Couples
    who "give birth to a patriot" during the June 12
    festivities win money, cars, refrigerators and
    other prizes.
  • Russia, with one-seventh of Earth's land surface,
    has just 141.4 million citizens, making it one of
    the most sparsely settled countries in the world.
    With a low birth rate and a high death rate, the
    population has been shrinking since the early
    1990s.
  • In his state-of-the-nation address last year,
    President Vladimir Putin called the demographic
    crisis the most acute problem facing Russia and
    announced a broad effort to boost Russia's birth
    rate, including cash incentives to families that
    have more than one child.
  • The 2007 grand prize went to Irina and Andrei
    Kartuzov, who received a UAZ-Patriot, a sport
    utility vehicle. Other contestants won video
    cameras, TVs, refrigerators and washing machines.

31
Doubling TimeRule of 70
  • Number of years it will take for population to
    double at current growth rate
  • 70 Growth Rate Doubling Time
  • Growth Rate Doubling Time
  • Uganda 3.4 21 years
  • Afghanistan 2.5 28 years
  • India 1.4 50 years
  • United States .5 140 years
  • Denmark 0.0 --
  • Ukraine -0.6 117 years (1/2)

32
Life Expectancy
Connection to Core vs. Periphery?
33
AGE DYNAMICS
34
Dependency Ratio
  • Dependents Under 15 over 65
  • How many supported by 15-65 group?
  • Problems?

35
Graying of the Core
  • Low birth and death rates in Core
  • Low population growth (not including immigration)
  • Steadily older population

36
Baby Bust (1965-1980)
Baby Boom (1946-1964)
37
Baby Boom impacts yet to come
  • Population Momentum / Population Echo
  • Strain on Social Security
  • Growing health care costs
  • Challenge is on YOU to support them financially!

38
Population Pyramidtracks age-sex groups
39
U.S. (virtually no growth)
40
Nigeria (rapid growth)
41
Argentina (slow growth)
42
Belarus?
43
Germany (effect of wars in 20th Century)
44
China (One-child policy)
45
Canada, 1971-2006
46
Russia, 1990-2050
47
Arabian Peninsula, 1980sLabor sending Labor
receiving
48
Sun City (Arizona) retirement community
49
Eau Claire County
6.4
5.7
5.0
4.4
50
Athens County, OH
8.1
8.2
7.0
6.0
51
Grafton Co., N.H. (1970)Two years before
Dartmouth went co-ed
52
(No Transcript)
53
Demographic Transition Model
Move from high birth and death rates to low birth
and death rates
Took centuries of development for Core to make
transition
More difficult for Periphery to make transition
without its own capital, skills, education
54
Demographic Transition
1
2
3
4
55
Demographic Transition Stage 5
56
Stages of Demographic Transition
  • 1. Pre-Industrial Equilibrium
  • (High BR, High DR
  • basic, subsistence living)
  • 2. Early Industrialization
  • (High BR, Declining DR
  • better sanitation, health care)
  • 3. Developed Industrialization
  • (Declining BR, Low DR
  • modernization, change of values)
  • 4. Post-Industrial Equilibrium
  • (Low BR, Low DR)
  • fully developedcore countries today
  • 5. Deindustrialization
  • (BR is lower than DR
  • fully developedlosing manufacturing

1 2 3 4 5
  • Which Stage?
  • Core?
  • Periphery?
  • Semi-Periphery?

57
Demographic Transition in Denmark
Core (low birth / death rates)
58
Demographic Transition in Chile
Semi-Periphery (low death rates, falling birth
rates)
59
Demographic Transition in Cape Verde, Africa
Periphery (high birth, high death rates)
60
Thomas Malthus (1766-1834) Theory of
Overpopulation
  • Famine
  • Disease
  • War

61
History of World Population
7
2013
62
Explanations for Periphery population growth
  • Is it simply that the Periphery cant stop
    reproducing?
  • Perhaps population growth is a symptom of
    poverty
  • Lack of education / information
  • Lack of career / opportunities
  • Lack of access to technology (i.e. contraception)
  • Colonial Legacy Catholicism (lack of) womens
    roles
  • Rural / Agricultural Legacy? (Farmhands, high
    IMR)
  • Support system for elderly
  • Q Because the Core consumes far more resources
    therefore do we foment , encourage, and desire
    the (re)production of more cheap, unskilled young
    labor?

63
Womens Empowerment Contraception Rates
64
Policies to lower birth rate
  • Forced
  • One-child policy (China)
  • Coercive population control
  • Gynocide
  • Infanticide
  • Voluntary
  • Availability of birth control
  • Incentives for small families
  • Social
  • Empowerment of women
  • Better health care and education
  • Significant decrease in child labor
  • Social Security
About PowerShow.com