An introduction to academic writing & plagiarism - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – An introduction to academic writing & plagiarism PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 3c7833-MDczY



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

An introduction to academic writing & plagiarism

Description:

An introduction to academic writing & plagiarism Dr Tony Lowe Learning Development Unit a.j.lowe_at_adm.leeds.ac.uk www.ldu.leeds.ac.uk/plagiarism Structure Welcome to ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:54
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 17
Provided by: lduLeeds
Learn more at: http://www.ldu.leeds.ac.uk
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: An introduction to academic writing & plagiarism


1
An introduction to academic writing plagiarism
  • Dr Tony Lowe
  • Learning Development Unit
  • a.j.lowe_at_adm.leeds.ac.uk

www.ldu.leeds.ac.uk/plagiarism
2
Structure
Structure
  • Welcome to University
  • Knowledge creation
  • Disseminating knowledge creation
  • Good academic writing
  • Note taking skills
  • What is plagiarism?
  • Plagiarism detection TurnitinUK
  • Summary

3
Welcome to University
  • Congratulations on coming to study at Leeds.
  • Your time here will be challenging, rewarding,
    enjoyable, stressful, exhausting etc
  • Assessments will form a big part of this
    experience.
  • With assessments comes the prospect of
    plagiarism.
  • Understanding the ethos/culture of University
    Higher Education will help

4
Knowledge Creation
  • A key activity at University is the creation of
    new knowledge.
  • Need to understand boundaries of existing
    knowledge
  • Then conduct research to advance these boundaries
  • Finally communicate the new knowledge
  • Teaching
  • Journal and conference papers

5
Good Academic writing
  • Evaluate the existing knowledge in this area.
  • Describe how the new knowledge was discovered
    (experiment, synthesis, survey etc.)
  • Discuss the implications of the new knowledge on
    future research etc.
  • Written is a manner that allows a reader to check
    the review of existing knowledge and repeat the
    activity to confirm/contest the new knowledge.

6
Academic writing II
  • Characteristics of academic writing
  • Structured
  • Clear
  • Appropriate language and style
  • References are used where previous knowledge is
    used

7
References
  • References are used to provide evidence to
    support positions, opinions, approaches taken
    etc. and to put current work in context.
  • Jones (1990) describes how the high soft tissue
    contrast displayed by ultrasound makes it ideal
    for examining organs such as the heart.
  • Without references the reasoning lacks
    credibility
  • Ultrasound is ideal for examining soft tissues.

8
Referencing
  • There are 3 components to a reference
  • In text reference (e.g. Jones 1994)
  • The paraphrased/quoted version of the original
  • Full reference details

9
Paraphrase
Berners-Lee et al (2001) argue that incorporating
artificial intelligence techniques into the
mechanisms of the Internet will result in new
systems with potential to make a large impact on
society. References Berners-Lee, T., Hendler,
J. Lassila, O., 2001, "The semantic web",
online , accessed Aug. 26th 2005, available
from world wide web http//www.scientificamerican.
com/sematic_web.htm
10
Quote
According to Berners-Lee et al (2001) "the
Semantic Web is an extension of the current web
in which information is given well-defined
meaning, better enabling computers and people to
work in cooperation". References Berners-Lee,
T., Hendler, J. Lassila, O., 2001, "The
semantic web", Scientific American, May pp36.
11
Note taking skills
  • Knowing that you are going to reference your
    sources requires you to document your
    research/reading in a rigorous way.
  • E.g. always write out the full reference detail
    with any notes. Where you copy phrases, sentences
    indicate this with quotation marks so you know
    when you include it in your assignment.
  • There is training and IT tools available to help.

12
Plagiarism what is it?
  • Plagiarism is defined as presenting someone
    elses work as your own. Work means any
    intellectual output, and typically includes text,
    data, images, sound or performance.(Office of
    Academic Appeals Regulation 2005)

Office of Academic Appeals Regulation, 2005,
Section 2.1 of the published procedures on
Cheating, plagiarism and fraudulent or fabricated
coursework (available online at
http//www.leeds.ac.uk/AAandR/cpff.htm - accessed
6th Aug 2005)
13
Plagiarism is serious
  • All cases are reported and go on your student
    record.
  • Penalties vary from written warnings, re-sitting
    modules to expulsion from the University.
  • Why? plagiarism undermines the Universitys
    reputation and the quality of its degrees and
    research, plus plagiarists miss out on learning!

14
Plagiarism detection
  • Subject experts knowledge of the discipline and
    its literature.
  • Changes in writing style, inappropriate writing
    style.
  • Electronically using Turnitin.

15
(No Transcript)
16
Summary
  • Learn about how to produce good academic writing.
  • Note taking
  • Referencing
  • Structure and style
  • You will learn more get higher marks!
  • If in doubt ask!

www.ldu.leeds.ac.uk/plagiarism
About PowerShow.com