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Key Leader Orientation

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1-1 Key Leader Orientation CTC is NOT a program. Rather, it is a step-by-step process that involves identifying the problem and contributors to the problem, selecting ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Key Leader Orientation


1
1-1
Key Leader Orientation
2

1-2
Key Leader Orientation
3
What actions and trends among the young people in
your communitymotivated you to attend this
session?
1-3
Key Leader Orientation
4
  • Give community leaders
  • an overview of the science-based Communities
    That Care prevention-planning system
  • an understanding of how the community can
    benefit from using this system to guide
    prevention planning and implementation.

1-4
Key Leader Orientation
5
  • On completing this orientation, you will be able
    to
  • explain the Communities That Care research
    foundation
  • describe the Communities That Care
    implementation process
  • identify how children, families and the
    community will benefit from this process
  • describe your role as a Key Leader
  • commit to the Communities That Care process,
    including use of the Communities That Care Youth
    Survey
  • plan for the next steps in the Communities That
    Care process.

1-5
Key Leader Orientation
6
Todays Agenda
  • Setting the Stage
  • The Research Foundation
  • The Implementation Process
  • Benefits and Results
  • Committing to the CTC Process
  • Next Steps

7
Setting the Stage
  • The Research Foundation

The Implementation Process
Break
Benefits and Results
Committing to the Communities That Care Process
Next Steps
Wrap-up and evaluations
1-6
Key Leader Orientation
8
Everyone gets a chance to speak. Everyone
listens whensomeone has the floor. (No side
conversations.) One person talks at a time and
doesnt get interrupted. Respect others
perspectives and ideas. (No put-downs.) Start
and end on time.
1-7
Key Leader Orientation
9
  • uses prevention-science research to promote
    positive youth development and prevent youth
    behavior problems

provides local control and flexibility to help
maintain support for the process
matches a local profile of risk and protection to
tested, effective policies, programs and
practices
focuses on outcomes to ensure accountability for
resources.
1-8
Key Leader Orientation
10
2-1
Key Leader Orientation
11
2-2
Key Leader Orientation
12
  • Provide an overview of the Communities That
    Care research foundation.

2-3
Key Leader Orientation
13
  • Describe the research foundation of the
    Communities That Care system.
  • Explain how the prevention-science research
    base helps build positive futures for youth and
    prevent problem behaviors.

2-4
Key Leader Orientation
14
  • The Social Development Strategy
  • The public health approach
  • Research-based predictors of problem behaviors
    and positive youth outcomesrisk and protective
    factors
  • Tested, effective prevention strategies

2-5
Key Leader Orientation
15
2-6
Key Leader Orientation
16
2-7
Key Leader Orientation
17
  • A research-based model that organizes known
    protective factors into a guiding framework for
    building positive futures for children

2-8
Key Leader Orientation
18
The goal Healthy behaviors for all children and
youth
Start with Healthy beliefs clear standards in
families, schools, communities and peer groups
Build Bonding Attachment Commitment to
families, schools, communities and peer groups
By providing Recognition
By providing Opportunities
By providing Skills
in families, schools, communities and peer
groups
And by nurturing Individual characteristics
2-9
Key Leader Orientation
19
  • The Social Development Strategy
  • The public health approach

2-10
Key Leader Orientation
20
2-11
Key Leader Orientation
21
  • Based on research on predictors of health
    problems
  • Modifies predictors to prevent behavior problems
  • Can affect the entire social environment
  • Works through collaboration
  • Can create long-lasting results

2-12
Key Leader Orientation
22
  • The Social Development Strategy
  • The public health approach
  • Research-based predictors of problem behaviors
    and positive youth outcomesrisk and protective
    factors

2-13
Key Leader Orientation
23
Risk factors
  • Research has identified risk factors in four
    domains

Risk factors are predictive of higher levels of
adolescent substance abuse, delinquency, teen
pregnancy, school drop-out and violence.
2-14
Key Leader Orientation
24
  • Research-based
  • Predictive in multiple longitudinal studies
  • Present in all areas of influence
  • Predictive of multiple problem behaviors
  • Present throughout development
  • Work similarly across racial lines
  • Measurable
  • Buffered by protective factors

2-15
Key Leader Orientation
25
Availability of Drugs
  • Availability of Firearms

Community Laws and Norms Favorable toward Drug
Use, Firearms and Crime
Media Portrayals of Violence
Transitions and Mobility
Low Neighborhood Attachment and Community
Disorganization
Extreme Economic Deprivation
2-16
Key Leader Orientation
26
Family History of the Problem Behavior
Family Management Problems
Family Conflict
Favorable Parental Attitudes and Involvement in
the Problem Behavior
2-17
Key Leader Orientation
27
Academic Failure Beginning in Late Elementary
School
Lack of Commitment to School
2-18
Key Leader Orientation
28
Early and Persistent Antisocial Behavior
Rebelliousness
Friends who Engage in the Problem Behavior
Gang Involvement
Favorable Attitudes toward the Problem Behavior
Early Initiation of the Problem Behavior
Constitutional Factors
2-19
2-19
Key Leader Orientation
Key Leader Orientation
29
Protective factors
  • Research has identified protective factors in
    four domains

Protective factorsbuffer young peoples exposure
to risk.
2-20
Key Leader Orientation
30
  • Research-based
  • Present in all areas of influence
  • Measurable
  • Predictive of positive youth development
  • Present throughout development
  • Buffer effects of risk exposure

2-21
Key Leader Orientation
31
  • Individual factors
  • High intelligence
  • Resilient temperament
  • Prosocial orientation
  • Competencies and skills
  • Prosocial opportunities
  • Reinforcement for prosocial involvement
  • Bonding
  • Healthy beliefs and clear standards

2-22
Key Leader Orientation
32
The goal Healthy behaviors for all children and
youth
Start with Healthy beliefs clear standards in
families, schools, communities and peer groups
Build Bonding Attachment Commitment to
families, schools, communities and peer groups
By providing Skills
By providing Recognition
By providing Opportunities
to families, schools, communities and peer groups
And by nurturing Individual characteristics
2-23
Key Leader Orientation
33
  • The Communities That Care framework
  • uses the Social Development Strategy
  • assesses risk and protective factors
  • matches risk and protection profiles with tested,
    effective programs
  • promotes positive youth development by reducing
    risk and enhancing protection.
  • The Search Institutes framework
  • assesses external and internal assets
  • promotes positive youth development by enhancing
    assets.

2-23A
Key Leader Orientation
34
Number of Protective Factors
Prevalence
Number of Risk Factors
2-24
Key Leader Orientation
35
Prevalence
Risk Factors
2-25
Key Leader Orientation
36
Prevalence
Number of Protective Factors
Number of Risk Factors
2-26
Key Leader Orientation
37
  • Risk and protective factors exist in all areas
    of childrens lives.
  • The more risk factors present, the greater the
    chances of problem behavior.
  • Risk and protective factors can be present
    throughout development.
  • Risk factors are buffered by protective factors.

2-27
Key Leader Orientation
38
  • Common risk and protective factors predict
    diverse behavior problems.
  • Risk and protective factors work similarly
    across racial lines.
  • Both risk and protective factors should be used
    in prevention efforts.

2-28
Key Leader Orientation
39
  • The Social Development Strategy
  • The public health approach
  • Research-based predictors of problem behaviors
    and positive youth outcomesrisk and protective
    factors
  • Tested, effective prevention strategies

2-29
Key Leader Orientation
40
  • Programs, policies or practices that have
    demonstrated effectiveness in
  • Reducing specific risk factors and enhancing
    protective factors
  • Enhancing positive behaviors and reducing
    negative behaviors

2-30
Key Leader Orientation
41
  • Project STAR
  • Adolescent Alcohol Prevention Trial
  • Preparing for the Drug-Free Years(Now called
    Families That Care Guiding Good Choices)
  • Adolescents Training and Learning to Avoid
    Steroids The ATLAS Program
  • Project Family
  • Strengthening Families Program
  • Focus on Families
  • Reconnecting Youth
  • Adolescent Transitions Program
  • (National Institute on Drug Abuse, 1997)

2-31
Key Leader Orientation
42
2-32
Key Leader Orientation
43
  • Assessing community levels of risk and
    protection
  • Prioritizing elevated risks and depressed
    protective factors
  • Including individuals and groups exposed to the
    highest levels of risk and the lowest levels of
    protection

2-33
Key Leader Orientation
44
  • 4. Matching tested, effective programs to the
    communitys risk and protection profile
  • 5. Selecting tested, effective programs that
    address the racial, economic and cultural
    characteristics of the community
  • 6. Implementing chosen programs,policies and
    practices with fidelity and intensity at the
    appropriate ages

2-34
Key Leader Orientation
45
2-35
Key Leader Orientation
46
Risk Factor Scale Scores
2-36
2-37
2-36
Key Leader Orientation
Community Board Orientation
Key Leader Orientation
47
Protective factors
Healthybeliefs/clearstandards
Riskfactor addressed
Programstrategy
Developmentalperiod
Opportunities
Skills
Recognition
Bonding
Prenatal/infancy programs
Family history of the problem behavior
Prenatal-2
Prenatal/infancy programs
Prenatal-2
Family management problems
Early childhood education
3-5
Prenatal-14
Parent training
6-14
Family therapy
Family conflict
Prenatal
Marital therapy
Prenatal/infancy programs
Prenatal-2
Prenatal-14
Parent training
6-14
Family therapy
Favorable parental attitudes and involvement in
the problem behavior
Prenatal/infancy programs
Prenatal-2
Prenatal-14
Parent training
Community/school policies
All
2-37
Key Leader Orientation
48
  • Nurse-Family Partnership(Olds et al., 1986 Olds
    Kitzman, 1993 Olds et al., 1998)
  • Syracuse Family Development Research
    Program(Lally, Mangione Honig, 1988)
  • Infant Health and Development Program(Ramey,
    1990 Ramey et al., 1992 Liaw et al., 1995)
  • Keys to CaregivinG videotape series(Barnard et
    al., 1988)

2-38
Key Leader Orientation
49
Protective factors
Healthybeliefs/clearstandards
Riskfactor addressed
Programstrategy
Developmentalperiod
Opportunities
Skills
Recognition
Bonding
Family history of the problem behavior
Prenatal/infancy programs
Prenatal-2
Prenatal/infancy programs
Prenatal-2
Family management problems
Early childhood education
3-5
Prenatal-14
Parent training
6-14
Family therapy
Family conflict
Prenatal
Marital therapy
Prenatal/infancy programs
Prenatal-2
Prenatal-14
Parent training
6-14
Family therapy
Favorable parental attitudes and involvement in
the problem behavior
Prenatal/infancy programs
Prenatal-2
Prenatal-14
Parent training
Community/school policies
All
2-39
Key Leader Orientation
50
  • Families That Care Guiding Good Choices
    (Catalano et al., 1998)
  • Preparing for School Success(Hawkins et al.,
    1999)
  • Iowa Strengthening Families Program (Spoth
    et al., 1998, 1999, 2001)

2-40
Key Leader Orientation
51
Risk Factor Scale Scores
2-41
Key Leader Orientation
52
Protective factors
Healthybeliefs/clearstandards
Riskfactor addressed
Programstrategy
Developmentalperiod
Opportunities
Skills
Recognition
Bonding
Parent/infancy programs
Academic failure beginning in late elementary
school
Prenatal-2
Early childhood education
3-5
Parent training
Prenatal-10
Organizational change in schools
6-18
Classroom organization, management and
instructional strategies
6-18
Classroom curricula for social competence
6-14
School behavior management strategies
6-14
Youth employmentwith education
15-21
2-42
Key Leader Orientation
53
  • Reconnecting Youth(Eggert et al., 1994)
  • Children of Divorce Intervention
    Program(Pedro-Carroll Cowen, 1985
    Pedro-Carroll et al., 1986, 1992)

2-43
Key Leader Orientation
54
2-44
Key Leader Orientation
55
  • Assessing community levels of risk and
    protection
  • Prioritizing elevated risks and depressed
    protective factors
  • Including individuals and groups exposed to the
    highest levels of risk and the lowest levels of
    protection

2-45
Key Leader Orientation
56
  • 4. Matching tested, effective programs to the
    communitys risk and protection profile
  • 5. Selecting tested, effective programs that
    address the racial, economic and cultural
    characteristics of the community
  • 6. Implementing chosen programs,policies and
    practices with fidelity and intensity at the
    appropriate ages

2-46
Key Leader Orientation
57
Risk Factor Scale Scores
2-47
Key Leader Orientation
58
2-48
Key Leader Orientation
59
3-1
Key Leader Orientation
60
3-2
Key Leader Orientation
61
  • Provide an overview of the Communities That
    Care implementation process.

3-3
Key Leader Orientation
62
  • On completing this module, you will be able to
  • Explain how the Communities That Care system
    works.
  • Describe the five phases of the Communities That
    Care system.
  • Discuss the time frames of the five phases.

3-4
Key Leader Orientation
63
3-5
Key Leader Orientation
64
  • Purpose Begin the Communities That Care
    process. Identify
  • people
  • scope
  • readiness
  • resources.

Support Strategic Consultation Tools for
Community Leaders A Guidebook for Getting Started
3-6
Key Leader Orientation
65
  • Purpose Prepare Key Leaders, the Community
    Board and community members for involvement by
  • developing an organizational structure
  • creating a work plan
  • securing resources to implement the Communities
    That Care system
  • confirming milestones and benchmarks to create
    accountability.

Support Key Leader Orientation Community Board
Orientation Technical Assistance as needed
3-7
Key Leader Orientation
66
  • Purpose Identify gaps in current response to
    priorities.
  • Assess risk factors, protective factors and
    problem behaviors (Communities That Care Youth
    Survey).
  • Prioritize risk and protective factors, and
    populations or geographic areas.
  • Complete resources assessment and gaps analysis.

Support Community Assessment Training Community
Resources Assessment Training Technical
Assistance as needed
3-8
Key Leader Orientation
67
  • Purpose Create a plan for implementing and
    evaluating tested, effective programs, policies
    and practices.
  • Measurable outcomes
  • Selection of programs, policies and practices to
    fill gaps
  • Implementation and evaluation plans

Support Community Planning Training Technical
Assistance as needed
3-9
Key Leader Orientation
68
  • Purpose Implement and evaluate the plan, and
    refine as needed.
  • Implement selected programs, policies and
    practices.
  • Evaluate the process and outcomes.
  • Adjust the plan.

Support Community Plan Implementation Training
Technical Assistance as needed
3-10
Key Leader Orientation
69
  • Established for each phase
  • Indicate critical steps and procedures
  • Document and celebrate accomplishments
  • Supported by training modules

3-11
Key Leader Orientation
70
  • Broad community involvement and ownership
  • Data-driven assessment of risk, protection,
    behavior and resources
  • Mutually agreed-upon focus and priorities
  • Research-based programs, policies and practices,
    building on existing resources
  • Outcome-based plan and evaluation strategy

3-12
Key Leader Orientation
71
  • Local sources
  • Foundations
  • In-kind contributions
  • Center for Substance Abuse Prevention
  • Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
    Prevention
  • U.S. Department of Education

3-13
Key Leader Orientation
72
3-14
Key Leader Orientation
73
3-15
Key Leader Orientation
74
Time line
75
3-16
Key Leader Orientation
76
4-1
Key Leader Orientation
77
4-2
Key Leader Orientation
78
  • Provide an overview of the benefits and results
    of the Communities That Care system.

4-3
Key Leader Orientation
79
  • Discuss the methods used to evaluate the
    Communities That Care system.
  • Describe the benefits and results of the
    Communities That Care system.

4-4
Key Leader Orientation
80
  • Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
    Prevention (1996, 1997)
  • United States General Accounting Office (1996)
  • Jenson, Hartman Smith (1997)
  • Harachi, Ayers, Hawkins, Catalano Cushing
    (1996, 1998)
  • Arthur, Ayers, Graham Hawkins (in press)

4-5
Key Leader Orientation
81
  • Shared vision and community norms
  • Common language
  • Coordinated data collection and analysis
  • Integrated planning processes

Jenson et al., 1997 U.S. General Accounting
Office, 1996Office of Juvenile Justice and
Delinquency Prevention, 1996, 1997
4-6
Key Leader Orientation
82
Increased
  • Funding
  • Collaboration among agencies
  • Accountability
  • Use of tested, effective programs
  • Long-range, strategic focus
  • Community involvement

Jenson et al., 1997 U.S. General Accounting
Office, 1996Office of Juvenile Justice and
Delinquency Prevention, 1996, 1997
4-7
Key Leader Orientation
83
Decreased
  • Turf conflict
  • Duplication or fragmentation of resources
  • Problem du jour approach
  • Use of untested or proven ineffective programs
  • Community disorganization

Jenson et al., 1997 U.S. General Accounting
Office, 1996Office of Juvenile Justice and
Delinquency Prevention, 1996, 1997
4-8
Key Leader Orientation
84
Ames, IA
Improved cognitive skills
Improved parenting skills, family relations,
community relations
East Prairie, MO
Montgomery County, MD
72 decrease in suspensions 30 decrease in
school problems
Decrease in student detentions, academic
failure, truancy
Nekoosa, WI
Decrease in fights, suspension Increased
feelings of safety at school
Lansing, MI
65 decrease in weapons charges 45 decrease in
burglary 29 decrease in drug offenses 27
decrease in assault charges 18 decrease in
larceny
Port Angeles, WA
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
Prevention, 1996, 1997
Key Leader Orientation
4-9
85
4-10
Key Leader Orientation
86
5-1
Key Leader Orientation
87
5-2
Key Leader Orientation
88
  • Obtain Key Leader commitment to the
    Communities That Care process.

5-3
Key Leader Orientation
89
  • Describe how Key Leaders support the Communities
    That Care system.
  • Obtain Key Leader commitment to the Communities
    That Care process.

5-4
Key Leader Orientation
90
  • Commit to the process
  • Engage other Key Leaders
  • Establish the Community Board
  • Oversee implementation of the Communities That
    Care system
  • Educate the community about the Communities
    That Care system

5-5
Key Leader Orientation
91
  • Hold the Community Board accountable
  • Build school-district support for the Communities
    That Care Youth Survey
  • Provide access to community resources and
    information
  • Support implementationof the Community Action
    Plan

5-6
Key Leader Orientation
92

5-7
Key Leader Orientation
93
  • Think about what you learned at this
    orientation.
  • Think about your vision and goals for your
    community.
  • Think about the skills you can bring to the
    effort.
  • Complete the commitment form and return it to the
    Coordinator/Facilitator.

5-8
Key Leader Orientation
94
5-9
Key Leader Orientation
95
6-1
Key Leader Orientation
96
6-2
Key Leader Orientation
97
  • Plan the next steps in the Communities That Care
    process.

6-3
Key Leader Orientation
98
  • Assess outstanding community readiness issues.
  • Identify other community leaders to involve.
  • Create a plan for establishing a Community
    Board.
  • Develop an action plan and time line for the
    next steps in the Communities That Care
    process.

6-4
Key Leader Orientation
99
  • Agreement on issues
  • Common definition of prevention
  • Support for a risk- and protection-focused
    approach

6-5
Key Leader Orientation
100
  • School district support for the Communities That
    Care Youth Survey
  • Willingness to collaborate
  • Coordination among existing initiatives
  • Involvement of stakeholder groups

6-6
Key Leader Orientation
101
  • Positional
  • Informal

6-7
Key Leader Orientation
102
  • The Community Board
  • represents the communitys diversity
  • includes representation from all stakeholder
    groups
  • has support of stakeholder groups
  • requires a three- to five-year commitment
  • requires a broad range of skills.

6-8
Key Leader Orientation
103
6-9
Key Leader Orientation
104
6-10
Key Leader Orientation
105
  • Address outstanding readiness issues.
  • Secure planning resources.
  • Recruit additional Key Leaders (if necessary)
    and establish a Key Leader Board structure.
  • Recruit Community Board members and conduct the
    Community Board Orientation.

6-11
Key Leader Orientation
106
6-12
Key Leader Orientation
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