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Welcome to your

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Title: Welcome to your


1
Welcome to your
West London Graduate Teacher Programme
  • Health and Safety (Core Session)
  • Accreditation

2
Please switch off your mobile phone
3
D T Health and Safety CPD Course
  • Exploring Issues related to Health and Safety in
    DT..
  • Obtaining DATA/NAAIDT TDA recognised
    certification.

4
  • Come from a background as DT teacher,
  • Then Head of Faculty.
  • Then Deputy Head.
  • Then the best job in the world
  • Then Lecturer at Brunel University.
  • Then Course Director at Brunel
  • Then my own company.
  • Consultancy work for agencies such as CfBT, DATA,
    GTP, EiSS project,TDA. and Sheffield Hallam
    University

5
My role today is that of a RDTHSC
  • Registered
  • Design and
  • Technology
  • Health and
  • Safety
  • Consultant

6
  • So why are we here today ?

7
HEALTH AND SAFETY TRAINING STANDARDS IN DESIGN
AND TECHNOLOGY
Preparing to meet the Core Level Training
Standards
8
This afternoon-
  • Session 1 Firstly, well look at the background
    to Health Safety with regard to your own
    career.
  • Session 2 in the main we will look at issues
    regarding Risk Assessments.

9
STATUS
The H and S training standards establish the
professional view of what should constitute the
minimum requirements ( 3 groups of people)
  • To obtain Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) in
    secondary D and T
  • For all colleagues involved in teaching D and T
    in schools and colleges
  • For all technicians, HLTA and other support staff

10
SUMMARY OF STANDARDS
For secondary schools, the health and safety
training standards have been set out as follows
- Core Level
- Specialist Levels
- Specialist Extension Levels
11
SUMMARY OF STANDARDS
Core Level
All secondary teachers/technicians and support
staff working in D and T should work towards
achieving accreditation at the Secondary Core
Health and Safety level (SCHS)
12
SUMMARY OF STANDARDS
Specialist Levels
In addition, all those staff should work toward
achieving accreditation within the Secondary
Specialist Levels appropriate to their work.
Currently these are in
Food Technology (SFHS) Textile Technology
(STHS) Resistant Materials (SMHS) Systems and
Control (SSHS)
13
SUMMARY OF STANDARDS
  • Specialist Extension Levels -
  • At present, only staff working in resistant
    materials are required to achieve accreditation
    at the Specialist Extension Levels.
  • Wood sawing machines (S1HS)
  • Centre lathe for metal cutting (S2HS)
  • Casting non-ferrous metals (S3HS)
  • Metal arc welding (S4HS)
  • Oxy-acetylene welding and cutting (S5HS)
  • Milling machines and machining centre (S6HS)
  • Wood turning lathe (S7HS)
  • Planer/thicknesser machine (S8HS)
  • Portable power tools (S9HS)

14
To meet the Core Level Standards
15
SUMMARY OF STANDARDS
Administration of the scheme
  • The scheme is administered via the DT
    Association who hold a national database is held
    of accredited staff
  • Cost of Accreditation
  • 25.00 for new Accreditation
  • 10.00 for Additional Awards
  • 25.00 for Re-accreditation (after 5 years)
  • Training has to be done (or organised) by a
    Registered D and T Health and Safety
    Consultant (RDTHSC), registered and licensed by
    the DT Association

16
Health and Safety Accreditation procedure
RDTHSC advertises course or is contacted directly
by training establishment/school/colleagues
requiring training
RDTHSC outlines cost of training to cover
tuition fees, venue costs, catering etc. and
registration/accreditation fee (to be paid direct
to DTA)
RDTHSC produces course register
RDTHSC delivers training
At end of the training, RDTHSC registers on-line
all colleagues who have completed the training
satisfactorily, providing details of areas to be
accredited and confirming whether the
accreditation is new or additional accreditation

DTA send pro-forma invoice to training
establishment/school/applicant
On receipt of payment, DTA send Accreditation
Certificate to applicant
17
Health and Safety Re-accreditation procedure
4.5 years after accreditation, DTA send
re-accreditation audit form and pro-forma
invoice for 25.00 to accredited colleague
Re-accreditation audit form completed by
applicant Primary, Core and Specialist Level
Standards Based on evidence of a personal HS
Portfolio Specialist Extension Level
Standards Based on evidence of attendance at
appropriate refresher training Audit form
countersigned by Subject Leader/Head of
Department/Headteacher as appropriate
School/applicant pays pro-forma invoice to DTA
Applicant returns completed re-accreditation
audit form to DTA
On receipt of audit form and payment, DTA send
updated Accreditation Certificate to applicant
18
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19
Your portfolio of evidence
20
Preparing a personal portfolio of evidence for
accreditation
  • 1 HS STANDARDS IN DT TDA/DT Association
  • HEALTH AND SAFETY TRAINING
  • ESSENTIAL PUBLICATIONS
  • RISK ASSESSMENTS
  • TEACHING STRATEGIES
  • COSHH ASSESSMENTS
  • ENVIRONMENT
  • PORTABLE APLIANCE TESTING
  • LEV TESTING
  • 10 MACHINE MAINTENANCE

21
1 HS STANDARDS IN DT TDA/DT Association
Know and understand the current TDA/DTA Health
and Safety Training Standards in Design and
Technology - Core and Specialist Level Standards
(as appropriate)
22
2 HEALTH AND SAFETY TRAINING
Evidence of your Health and Safety training
records to indicate training completed and
training needs identified N.B. Applicants for
SFHS should ensure that their food hygiene
accreditation is up to date
23
3 ESSENTIAL PUBLICATIONS
Know where to access essential HS publications
within the department
24
Legal Publications
25
4 RISK ASSESSMENTS
  • Evidence of how risk assessments are completed
    for activities or for specific pieces of
    equipment within your material area
  • This can include the adoption and adaptation of
    model risk assessments

26
5 TEACHING STRATEGIES
  • Evidence of
  • How HS issues are incorporated into your
    schemes of work
  • How HS training is provided for learners and
    how this training is recorded

27
6 COSHH ASSESSMENTS
Evidence of how COSHH assessments are undertaken
within the department, e.g. using hazard data
sheets for materials, substances or processes
within your work area and identifying how you
remove or minimise associated risks
28
7 ENVIRONMENT
Evidence in the form of photographs or sketches
of your work area (or one that you regularly work
in) annotated to show key features of a safe
working environment or identifying any current
concerns
29
8 PORTABLE APPLIANCE TESTING
Evidence that Portable Appliance Testing has been
carried out annually on equipment in your own
work area (or one that you regularly work in)
30
9 LEV TESTING
Evidence that LEV testing has been carried out
every 14 months on equipment within your work
area (if applicable)
31
10 MACHINE MAINTENANCE
Evidence of how machinery and equipment is
regularly maintained and serviced within your
work area (if applicable)
32
Structure of this Module
  • CORE SESSION - Look at general Health Safety
    Issues regarding Design and Technology.
  • Undertake a series of group-work activities.
  • Sharpen your awareness
  • Accreditation/assessment by portfolio of evidence

33
Publications you will need
  • Health and Safety Training Standards in DT ISBN
    1 898788 47B
  • BS4163(2007) ISBN 0 580 33167 9 Health and
    Safety for Design and Technology.
  • Risk Assessments in Secondary Schools and
    Colleges Design and Technology Teaching
    Environments. ISBN 1 898788 14 6
  • (All above available from DATA)
  • Building Bulletin 81 (BB81)
  • Obtain CLEAPSS model risk assessments in D T or
    similar.
  • Any LEA codes of practice or policy documents.

34
DATA Accreditation
  • A trainee being awarded QTS must have the core
    level and at least one, and preferably two, of
    the specialist levels, from-
  • Food Technology (including Home Economics) (SFHS)
  • Resistant Materials (SMHS)
  • Systems and Control (SSHS)
  • Textile Technology (STHS)

35
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Two routes to accreditation
37
Unlike other subjects in the school curriculum in
D T we..
  • work with substances that are hazardous (often
    quite toxic) and design and make products using
    machines and mechanisms.
  • we are by our Duty of Care bound by law to comply
    with the Health and Safety at Work Act. (1974)
    The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health
    Regulations.COSHH (1999)
  • http//www.healthandsafety.co.uk/haswa.htm
  • http//www.hmso.gov.uk/si/si1994/Uksi_19943246_en_
    1.htm

38
Module 1
  • Whenever I use a box coloured like this it means
    that in your portfolio there should be evidence
    to support the statement.

Usually we walk around the teaching rooms and
preparation areas and identify areas of good
practice and then things that you feel could be
improved upon.
In your subject knowledge development you will
need to become familiar with a document called
Building Bulletin 81
39
Building Bulletin 81 (BB81)
40
Building Bulletin 81
41
Module 1
  • Course delegates must demonstrate that they can
    develop appropriate attitudes in their students
    with regard to health and safety.

This statement underpins the need to develop an
appropriate culture of Health and Safety.
Wherever possible school students should be
involved in health and safety decisions and
audits, it dramatically improves the students
awareness and will help develop departmental
culture.
42
Some Case Studies (1)
  • Two School Children died whilst on a teacher lead
    outdoor activity called river walking. Failure
    to carry out a risk assessment for river walking
    activities.
  • Total Fine 30,000

43
Some Case Studies (2)
  • For failing to ensure HS regarding falls from
    height. Relates to accident when an Arts
    Technician fell from a ladder (approx 3.5 metres)
    whilst working on lighting for a school play.
  • Total fine  5,000

44
Some Case Studies (3)
  • Employee injured when using unguarded circular
    saw. No training to use woodworking machinery,
    did not prevent access to the machine's blade in
    operation
  • Total Fine 20,000

45
Some Case Studies (4)
  • Failure to provide instruction, information,
    training and supervision which resulted in injury
    of 16yr old technician.
  • Total Fine   2,500

46
Some Case Studies (5)
  • Summary Prosecution following the investigation
    of an accident to a teacher who was working on an
    unguarded spindle moulding machine.  
  • Total fine 9,000

47
Some Case Studies (6)
  • Failing to maintain basketball posts at school.
    School child injured.
  • Total Fine 10,000

48
Some Case Studies (7)
  •  Five-a-side metal goalpost overturned onto 7
    year old boy causing head injury. Prosecution
    proposed and approved because (a) serious risk to
    vulnerable people (b) risk well known and
    publicised (c) appropriate precautions e.g.
    securing goalpost in the ground not taken..
  • Total Fine  1,500

49
Some Case Studies (8)
  •  Pupil injured when her hand was drawn into gap
    between work-rest and rapidly rotating sanding
    disc she was operating. Failure to have in place
    sufficiently robust, positive checking of
    machinery prior to use by pupils in school
    workshop.
  • Total Fine   4,000

50
Some Case Studies (9)
  • Pupil seriously injured at pedestal drill.
    Work-pieces not secured. No risk assessment.
  • Total Fine 6,250

51
Some Case Studies (10)
  • Prosecution under the Gas Safety Regulations and
    Management Regulations following failure to
    maintain gas appliances in school resulting in
    unsafe condition of several appliances and an
    accident, and failure to remedy matters after the
    accident. Lack of monitoring by LEA resulted in
    poor level of compliance with statutory
    maintenance at other schools.
  • Total Fine  10,000

52
Some Case Studies (11)
  • Prosecution under the Portable Appliance Act. PAT
    testing was undertaken by a self-taught
    technician and a green sticker applied to an
    appliance.Examination after a resulting electric
    shock to a pupil found that there was no earth
    bonding on the appliance.
  • Total Fine  8,000

53
Some Case Studies
  • Source HSE web site http//.www.hse.gov.uk

54
Lets look at some issues.
  • Well look at a slide show, work in pairs just
    jot down some key words as prompts to yourself as
    we go through the slides. One of you look at
    aspects of good practice and the other at aspects
    that could be improved upon.

55
Lets take a look at some issues
56
HS is about pride in the quality of their own
work
57
Now whats going on here?
This class are year 9, but it is their first year
in the secondary school, and for some of them it
is the first time that they have studied food
technology, as not all middle schools offer food
as a material area in design and technology.
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66
Module 1
  • Course delegates must demonstrate that they can
    develop appropriate attitudes in their students
    with regard to health and safety.

This statement underpins the need to develop an
appropriate culture of Health and Safety.
Wherever possible students should be involved in
health and safety decisions and audits, it
dramatically improves the students awareness and
will help develop departmental culture.
67
ACTIVITY 1a
  • Brainstorm issues Affecting the Culture of Health
    and Safety.
  • 2 groups
  • There are two generic issues which impinge on the
    development of a HS culture
  • Personal Issues, related to your own teaching and
    your organisation of the teaching environment i.e
    issues over which you have personal control.
  • Institutional Issues relating to the management
    of the school over which you have no control.
  • One group will spend 10 minutes brainstorming
    Personal issues and the other group will
    brainstorm Institutional issues.

68
  • After 10 minutes rotate ideas and delegates spend
    about 5 minutes assessing and adding to the
    points.
  • Each group will then prioritise two issues from
    each generic issue.

69
ACTIVITY 1b
  • Consider the issues you raised in 1a and in our
    following discussion.
  • Again the same 2 groups
  • This time discuss three personal strategies and
    three institutional strategy you could, or have,
    implemented in school.
  • Each strategy should be simple and achievable,
    e.g
  • Personal Strategy, Improve organisation at the
    end of lessons to ensure the DT room is clean
    and tidy in preparation for the next group..
  • Institutional Strategy, Ask that issues about
    ventilation in the DT room is put on the agenda
    for the next Department meeting.

70
You and your career
  • Today is about you having ownership of your own
    development as a Design and Technology Teacher.
  • One of the most important documents that your
    department owns (should own) is The Department
    Policy Document.
  • If an accident happens it is this document that
    is first examined.
  • You being involved in the development of this
    policy and having ownership of it is very
    important

71
Module 1b
  • Course delegates must demonstrate that they can
    develop appropriate teaching strategies,
    understanding the common misconceptions,
    mistakes, possible risks and pupil management
    issues associated with design and technology
    activities.
  • In your portfolio you will need to demonstrate
    that you can assess when to
  • Teach the whole class
  • Divide the class into small groups for
    collaborative work,
  • Split the group into 2 to reduce practical
    activities to a minimum
  • Request support staff.

Teachers need to take into account the variations
in attitudes to HS between gender and age
groups. Year 7 pupils may think that all machines
in the DT room are too dangerous for the whereas
year 10 pupils feel they are immortal and
accidents wont happen to them.
72
Notes from this session-
  • The notes and discussions you record today are an
    important part of collecting the evidence to
    support the statements in your portfolio.

73
Task discuss with your neighbour for 5 minutes
  • prioritise two issues from each generic issue.

74
Now swop your priorities with another pair
  • Consider their Issue and change that issue into
    part of a development strategy. Each strategy
    should be simple and achievable, e.g
  • Personal Strategy, Improve organisation at the
    end of lessons to ensure the DT room is clean
    and tidy in preparation for the next group..
  • Institutional Strategy, Ask that issues about
    ventilation in the DT room is put on the agenda
    for the next Department meeting.

75
Module 1b
  • Course delegates must demonstrate that they
    ensure that they are trained to use, and teach
    others to use, potentially dangerous machinery.

Teachers should not use any equipment with which
they dont feel confident or are not qualified to
use. The Head of Department should create an
ethos of co-operation between staff so that they
can ask for help without feeling undermined.
School students must not be allowed to use any
equipment, including hand tools, until they have
received adequate training with appropriate
reinforcement.
76
Teachers should be able to show records of absent
pupils and that they use them to enable pupils to
catch up on training missed.
  • Course delegates must demonstrate that they
    ensure that both pupils and staff wear adequate
    protective clothing e.g that safety goggles are
    provided and worn when machining.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) needs to be
worn on many occasions in DT.
  • It may be useful for departments to identify in
    their H S Policy the action to be taken
  • If students do not follow instructions regarding
    PPE
  • If staff do not comply with the safety signs.

77
It is the teachers responsibility to ensure that
the items needed for PPE are readily to hand
,clean and in sufficient quantities. It is the
employers responsibility to provide PPE.
  • Course delegates must demonstrate that they can
    plan and conduct lessons safely taking account of
    the size and nature of the class and their
    activities e.g. interactions with individual
    pupils are organised so that they are able to
    maintain an overview of the actions of the rest
    of the class.
  • Just spend a minute discussing what you feel are
    the most contentious issues regarding
    departmental development!
  • Space and the size of the group are probably the
    most contentious of all the HS issues in DT..
  • The overcrowding experienced by most DT teachers
    compromises the HS and Welfare of both staff and
    pupils.

78
The following hazards can be associated with
overcrowding e.g
  • Lack of ventilation
  • This can cause pupils to be drowsy and irritable
  • Jostling around machines
  • Pupils may come into contact with moving parts
    inadvertent starting of machines.
  • Insufficient tools and equipment
  • Pupils may become frustrated and behaviour may
    suffer.
  • Poor working posture.
  • It is more difficult for teachers to effectively
    monitor large groups.
  • Teacher ability stretched.
  • Pupils may not have room to adopt correct posture
    because of insufficient spaces between work
    places.

79
Module 1c Class Supervision
  • Course delegates must demonstrate that they are
    capable of using a range of teaching strategies
    that are appropriate to the activities taking
    place, e.g. group work to reduce the amount of
    equipment being used..

Teaching strategies should be employed to ensure
that the appropriate level of supervision is
given for particular situations.
General Class Supervision This is suitable for
low risk activities such as.
80
Close Class Supervision This is suitable for
medium risk activities such as.
One to One Supervision This is suitable for high
risk activities such as.
81
Module 1c
  • Course delegates must demonstrate that they know
    about HS issues and are able to ensure the
    safety of themselves, the pupils and other adults
    in the room, especially with regard to protective
    clothing and equipment.
  • Course delegates must demonstrate that they are
    aware of the potential risks associated with the
    presence in the room of non-specialist adults
    e.g. non specialist teachers, visiting adults
    S.E.N support staff.

82
Teachers should consider the following if other
staff are joining their groups or if supply/cover
staff are using their room.
  • Support staff take up one of the available
    workspaces.
  • If you have support staff in your class it is
    likely that the nature of the group should demand
    a risk assessment (or amendment)
  • The support staff should be trained if they are
    using equipment.
  • They should know their role is the room has to be
    evacuated in an emergency.
  • Supply/cover teachers should not have access to
    equipment they are not trained to use.
  • They should be aware of departmental policies.
  • They should know what to do in case of an
    accident.
  • The activities of supply/cover and registration
    groups should be monitored particularly in food
    rooms where there may be a risk of contamination.

83
No time for the detail..
Ive already talked about this publication, but
as part of your CPD you need to read
BS4163(2007) to inform you about your
organisation and the teaching environment.
84
Module 1c
  • Course delegates must demonstrate that they know
    that they should ensure that the environment is
    not a health and safety hazard and be able to
    organise working spaces to minimise risks.
  • The teaching environment plays a vital role in
    developing a Health and Safety Culture.
  • In general terms the teacher needs to ensure that
    the environment is clean and well organised. It
    should give the impression on first sight that
    HS is an important issue and demonstrate that
    students are expected to take Health and Safety
    seriously.

85
ACTIVITY 1c
  • This time the activity is as individuals (10
    minutes)
  • Identify an aspect of your teaching environment
    that you have already discussed/identified. E.g.
    Electrical installation, lighting, temperature.
    Floor spaces around equipment (see Building
    Bulletin 81 and or www. Teachernet.org.uk)
  • There are 2 aspects we would like you to
    consider.
  • State the current situation regarding this aspect
    of your teaching environment,
  • Before we next meet refer to BS4163(2007) and
    state the situation which should exist regarding
    this aspect of your environment,

86
ACTIVITY 1d
  • Calculating the number of workspaces
  • Sketch the layout of one of the rooms in your
    School
  • (1)Calculate the overall floor area of the room.
  • (2)Calculate the areas of fixed benching and
    machinery.
  • Subtract step (2) from step (1) and divide the
    result by 4
  • This gives you the number of workspaces in the
    room which includes the teacher and any support
    staff.

87
Respiratory Protective Equipment
  • RPE shall (where possible) be of the disposable
    type.
  • Must be discarded on expiry of its useful life.
  • In any event 30 days after first use.
  • Non-disposable RPE must be examined and tested at
    specific intervals by an appointed member of
    departmental staff.

88
Equipment, Tools Materials and Components
  • Course delegates must demonstrate that they have
    secure knowledge of, understanding about and have
    the capability to use equipment processes and
    tools in a safe manner before they use them and
    teach them to others.

know and can apply appropriate regulations for
the use and application of materials and
components, taking account of factors such as
storage, fumes, dust, microbiological hazard,
skin contact and other allergic reactions
89
Need awareness of
  • Space required for the equipment/activity
  • Lighting and ventilation requirements
  • COSHH requirements
  • Guarding
  • PPE requirements
  • Proper systems for holding work
  • Rate and speed and feed.
  • Dust and swarf and other by-products.
  • Electrical supply requirements and checks
  • The amount of supervision required
  • Hygiene

90
Equipment, Tools Materials and Components
understand procedures to ensure that accidents
and therefore liabilities are avoided.
are aware that appropriate records must be kept
on machine servicing.
Spend 5 minutes with the person next to you and
discuss what you think should be in the records
and how the recordings should be made.
Health and Safety Officer. Employers are
legally required to appoint one or more competent
persons to assist in carrying out measures to
comply with Health Safety legislation, where
possible they should be employees. In addition
teaching unions may appoint HS representatives.
91
The role of the HSE
  • The HSE will investigate reportable accidents
    which occur in schools.
  • They will examine the actual circumstances of the
    accident. It is here that classroom teacher
    liability will be assessed.
  • They will then examine the management systems
    which are in place to prevent accidents
    happening, when they were last reviewed and the
    procedures for ensuring that they are effective.
  • YOU along with The Head of Department are key
    people in the development and implementation of
    preventative planning.

92
Recap to here -So we need to check-
  • Have the pupils been taught to use the equipment?
  • Have you checked that the pupils have understood?
  • Have you reminded the pupils about how to use the
    equipment?
  • Have you done a risk assessment and implemented
    the control measures? (lesson plan recorded).
  • Are the pupils sufficiently mature to undertake
    the activity?
  • If the risk assessment has been done by someone
    else, have you read it and do you understand it?
  • Do you insist that pupils wear aprons and PPE at
    all times?
  • Do you do the same?
  • Do you insist that technicians and other adults
    also wear such equipment.

93
Well take a short break now
94
Activities for your School Experience visits
  • In the main its about Risk Assessment,
  • but we need to revisit the questions you
    formulated last week.

95
Teaching spaces
  • Calculation regarding the number of workspaces in
    an area where you are likely to be teaching. to
    do during your visit to your School Experience
    School.
  • Sketch the layout of one of the rooms in your
    School Experience School that you are/likely to
    use.
  • (1)Calculate the overall floor area of the room.
  • (2)Calculate the areas of fixed benching and
    machinery.
  • Subtract step (2) from step (1) and divide the
    result by 4
  • This gives you the number of workspaces in the
    room which includes the teacher and any support
    staff.

96
Consider-
  • Is the space sufficiently large for work benches
    and equipment? (See Building Bulletin 81)
  • Is the space sufficient for pupils with special
    needs?
  • Is the workspace clean and tidy?
  • Are tools etc accessible without the teacher
    leaving the room?
  • Are the tools etc all sharp and in good working
    order?

97
Consider-
  • Are store rooms clean and tidy?
  • Is lighting and heating appropriate?
  • Is it possible to electrically isolate all
    machines?
  • Are there knee or foot emergency stops?
  • Are safety notices clearly displayed?
  • Is fire fighting equipment available?
  • Is the furniture/machines of the correct height?
  • Have COSHH assessments been made?

98
Module 2 Risk Assessment
  • .every employer to carry out suitable and
    sufficient risk assessment of-
  • the risks to the health and safety of his
    employees to which they are exposed whilst they
    are at work and
  • The risks to the Health and Safety of persons not
    in his employment arising out of or in
    conjunction with the conduct by him and his
    undertakings

99
In a Nutshell
  • What we do is all about
  • RISK ASSESSMENT.
  • Because our subject is so creative we have got to
    allow the students to take risks, but those risks
    must be well calculated.

100
Review
Develop
Improve
101
So what do we have to do?
  • Identify assess the risks, to students, staff,
    contractors and the public.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of existing controls.
  • Identify risks which are inadequately controlled.
  • Identify and implement the new controls required
    and review their effect.

102
Risk Assessment
  • The forms used will vary between institutions.
  • Must contain at least the four main areas.
  • Hazard identification.
  • Control Measures
  • Emergency action
  • Other information.

103
Whose responsibility.?
  • Not the HoDs but those who expose people to the
    potential risks.
  • In law you are libel.
  • (When I started teaching it was the Headteachers
    responsibility but ..)

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Substances include.
  • All solids,liquids,gases,vapours biological
    materials.
  • May include- chemicals, minerals, by-products
    and wastes, gases, fumes, fuels, solvents,
    adhesives, paints, cleaning materials, dusts
    and-
  • Mechanical moving parts. so we need to cover
    all machinery in our workshops.

105
Responsibility of Departments
  • Departments - must either -
  • Prevent exposure to hazardous substances
  • Or when prevention is not reasonably practical
    must
  • Adequately control any exposure.
  • THE PREFERRED OPTION IS
  • Substitute a no-risk or lower-risk substance or
    method of work.

106
Where Prevention is not Reasonably Practical
  • Appropriate protection measures must be applied
    consistent with your risk assessment.
  • Order of Priority.
  • Identify appropriate processes, systems of work,
    engineering controls, equipment and materials.
  • Control the exposure at source containment and
    ventilation and exclude unauthorised personnel.

107
  • Where exposure cannot be controlled by other
    means, the provision and use of suitable personal
    protective clothing in addition to the measures
    we already discussed is ESSENTIAL.

108
Risk Assessments must
  • Be carried out by competent person (s)
  • Be recorded in retrievable form
  • Be reviewed and modified at regular intervals.
  • The Management of Health and Safety at Work
    Regulations (1999)

109
  • A Risk Assessment is not required for each
    lesson.
  • Sufficient to produce one for each project FPT or
    activity carried out by a particular year group.
  • Staff may wish to work together as a department
    using a set of generic or model risk
    assessments (eg. CLEAPSS) which can then be
    modified for each of their teaching groups.

110
CLEAPSS
  • Consortium of
  • Local
  • Education
  • Authorities for the
  • Provision of
  • Science
  • Services

111
For the future you may wish to consider
112
ACTIVITY 2
  • In pairs work through completing the risk
    assessment form using a project or a FPT that one
    of you has recently undertaken.
  • Time 30 minutes.
  • Look at the following chart first

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Evaluating Risk
Severity 4 Very severe 3 Severe 2 Moderate 1
Slight 0 Negligible
Likelihood
Severity
Likelihood 4 Inevitable 3 Highly Probable 2
Probable 1 Possible 0 Remote possibility
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Risk Assessment How?
Each area is scored out of 4 with 0 being no risk
and 4 being high risk
0
1
2
0
Total
3
LSR
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LSR
SRC
RSA
IAR
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End of session 3
  • Before our next meeting and during your visits to
    your School Experience School you have 3 tasks
  • Undertake a risk assessment for a teaching aspect
    that you will be working on.
  • Sketch a work area and calculate the number of
    workspaces in that area.
  • Go back and look at the list of aspects that we
    identified at the start of this session read
    BB81 and BS4163 (2007) -and write bullet points
    about what you have found in your department.

118
More Departmental Responsibilities
  • HoD must ensure that all engineering controls
    (Including fume cupboards) and local exhaust
    ventilation and pressure systems are subject to
    appropriate regimes of maintenance, examination
    and testing.
  • So its here that PAT testing comes in.

119
PAT Testing
Who does it? How is it recorded?
120
The Teaching Environment
  • The Teaching Environment plays an important role
    in developing a Health and Safety Culture.
  • Teachers need to ensure the environment is clean
    and well organised.
  • It should give the impression on first sight that
    Health and Safety is an important issue.

121
When thinking about the environment you need to
  • Ensure the environment is not a HS hazard and be
    able to organise working spaces to avoid risks.
  • Be aware of BS 4163 (2007) Health and Safety for
    DT in schools and apply current safety
    regulation.
  • Be able to monitor and review school policy and
    apply current safety working practices.

122
Teaching Strategies.
  • When thinking about teaching strategies you need
    to-
  • Adopt appropriate teaching strategies
    understanding common misconceptions and mistakes
    that are associated with DT activities.
  • Plan and teach lessons safely, Taking account the
    needs of the class and the activities to be done.
  • Be aware of the presence of other non-specialist
    adults in the room.
  • Be sure that you can develop appropriate
    attitudes with regard to H S.

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Check that-
  • Are you sure that other adults involved in the
    lesson are aware of Health and Safety issues?
  • Have you checked to see that all tools in your
    lesson plan are available and properly
    maintained?
  • Is pupils work properly stored?
  • Do you have reminder notices about safety points
    displayed in the room.
  • Is your first-aid qualification up-to-date?
  • If something goes wrong is appropriate help
    nearby?

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Records
  • Department must retain records of risk
    assessments for at least five years after the
    cessation of the activity concerned.
  • Copies of the risk assessment must be lodged with
    the Schools SMT.
  • All accidents and incidents concerning activities
    that have an associated risk assessment must be
    reported to the SMT.

125
Module 3 Equipment, Tools Materials and
Components
  • Course delegates must demonstrate that they are
    aware of the regulations and guidance in using
    electrical, electronic, mechanical, hydraulic,
    pneumatic components and systems.

are aware of the risks and potential dangers
associated with the dismantling of existing
products in order to carry out investigative,
disassembly and evaluative activities as part of
the National Curriculum Programmes of Study.
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Module 3 Equipment, Tools Materials and
Components
know what Health and Safety training is required
and what pupils need to be taught about H S.
understand their liabilities as teachers and the
liabilities of the schools line management
structure with regard to HS.
are aware of the need to have specific training
in order to use and teach others how to use
certain tools and equipment.
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Module 3 Equipment, Tools Materials and
Components
  • .are aware of the regulations and guidance at
    national, LEA (LEA is legally obliged to have a
    policy) and school level related to the teaching
    of Design and Technology.

understand and apply current legal requirements
with regard to Health and Safety issues regarding
the teaching of Design and Technology in Schools
understand their responsibilities as employees
and their employers responsibilities toward them.
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ACTIVITY 3
  • Identify a piece of equipment used in a room in
    which you teach in e.g hand tools, centre lathe,
    pillar drill etc., and use BS4163 (2207) to make
    brief notes against each of the headings in the
    chart.

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LAST ACTIVITY
  • Identify a piece of equipment used in a room in
    which you teach in e.g hand tools, centre lathe,
    pillar drill etc., and use BS4163 (2207) to make
    brief notes against each of the headings in the
    table.

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Health and Safety
Its all a question of balance !!!!!
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.and finally
Enjoy your subject and above all else enjoy your
career as a DT teacher, its something special
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les_at_ideasin2action.co.uk
My contact
www.ideasin2action.co.uk
01526 378111
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