Computer Software - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Computer Software PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 3c45d0-YWQ1Y



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Computer Software

Description:

14 Computer Software Describe several important trends occurring in computer software. Give examples of several major types of application and system software. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:268
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 48
Provided by: sciNuAcT
Learn more at: http://www.sci.nu.ac.th
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Computer Software


1
Computer Software
14
2
14
Learning Objectives
  • Describe several important trends occurring in
    computer software.
  • Give examples of several major types of
    application and system software.
  • Explain the purpose of several popular software
    packages for end user productivity and
    collaborative computing.

3
14
Learning Objectives (continued)
  • Outline the functions of an operating system.
  • Describe the main uses of software programming
    languages and tools.

4
14
Section I
  • Application Software End User Applications

5
14
Software
  • Types of software
  • Application software
  • System software
  • Application software for end users
  • Application-specific
  • General-purpose
  • Perform common information processing jobs
  • Sometimes known as productivity packages

6
14
Software Suites and Integrated Packages
  • Suites are a number of productivity packages
    bundled together
  • Microsoft Office
  • Lotus SmartSuite
  • Corel WordPerfect Office
  • Sun StarOffice

7
Software Suites and Integrated Packages
(continued)
14
  • Advantages of suites
  • Cost
  • Similar graphical user interface
  • Share common tools
  • Programs are designed to work together
  • Disadvantages of suites
  • Large size
  • Many features never used by many end users

8
Software Suites and Integrated Packages
(continued)
14
  • Integrated Packages
  • Combine SOME of the features of several programs
  • Cannot do as much as individual packages or
    suites

9
14
Web Browsers
  • Key software interface to the hyperlinked
    resources of the World Wide Web and the rest of
    the Internet
  • Internet Explorer
  • Netscape Communicator

10
14
Electronic Mail and Instant Messaging
  • E-Mail
  • Has changed the way people work and communicate
  • Instant Messaging
  • An e-mail/computer conferencing hybrid technology
  • Allows real time communication/collaboration

11
14
Word Processing and Desktop Publishing
  • Word Processing
  • Has computerized the creation, editing, revision,
    and printing of documents.
  • Advanced features
  • Desktop Publishing
  • Design and print newsletters, brochures, manuals,
    and books
  • Page design process
  • Page makeup or page composition
  • WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get)

12
14
Electronic Spreadsheets
  • Used for business analysis, planning, and
    modeling
  • Involves designing its format and developing the
    relationships (formulas)

13
14
Electronic Spreadsheets (continued)
  • Allows end users to perform
  • What-if
  • Goal-seeking
  • Sensitivity analysis
  • Strength
  • Computation and calculation

14
14
Database Management
  • Performs four primary tasks
  • Database development
  • Define/organize content, relationships, and
    structure of the data
  • Database Interrogation
  • Selectively retrieve and display information
  • Produce forms, reports, other documents

15
14
Database Management (continued)
  • Four primary tasks (continued)
  • Database maintenance
  • Add, delete, update, and correct the data
  • Application development
  • Develop prototypes of web pages, queries, forms,
    reports, and labels

16
14
Database Management (continued)
  • Strength
  • Storage of large amounts of data
  • Weakness
  • Computation and calculation

17
14
Presentation Graphics
  • Helps convert numeric data into graphic displays
  • Helps prepare multimedia presentations
  • Easy to use

18
14
Personal Information Managers
  • For end user productivity and collaboration
  • Store, organize, and retrieve information
  • Information about customers
  • Appointments
  • Contact lists
  • Task lists
  • Schedules

19
14
Groupware
  • Collaboration software
  • Helps workgroups and teams work together to
    accomplish group assignments
  • Combines a variety of software features and
    functions
  • E-mail
  • Discussion groups and databases
  • Scheduling
  • Task management
  • Audio and videoconferencing
  • Data sharing

20
14
Other Business Software
21
14
Section II
  • System Software Computer System Management

22
14
System Software Overview
  • Programs that manage and support a computer
    system and its information processing activities
  • Serves as the software interface between computer
    networks and hardware and the application
    programs of end users

23
14
System Software Overview (continued)
  • Two major categories
  • System management programs
  • Operating systems
  • Network management programs
  • Database management systems
  • System utilities
  • System development programs
  • Programming language translators editors
  • CASE (computer-aided software engineering)

24
14
Operating Systems
  • Integrated system of programs that
  • Manages the operations of the CPU
  • Controls the input/output and storage resources
    and activities of the computer system
  • Provides various support services as the computer
    executes application programs

25
14
Operating Systems (continued)
  • Performs five basic functions
  • Provides a user interface
  • Allows humans to communicate with the computer
  • Command-driven
  • Menu-driven
  • Graphical user interface

26
14
Operating Systems (continued)
  • Five basic functions (continued)
  • Resource management
  • Manages the hardware and networking resources of
    the system
  • Virtual memory capability

27
14
Operating Systems (continued)
  • Five basic functions (continued)
  • File management
  • Controls the creation, deletion, and access of
    files of data and programs
  • Keeps track of the physical location of files

28
14
Operating Systems (continued)
  • Five basic functions (continued)
  • Task management
  • Manages the accomplishment of the computing tasks
    of end users
  • Multitasking
  • Multiprogramming
  • Timesharing

29
14
Operating Systems (continued)
  • Popular Operating Systems
  • Windows
  • 95, 98, ME
  • NT
  • 2000
  • XP
  • Popular operating systems (continued)
  • UNIX
  • Linux
  • Mac OS X

30
14
Network Management Programs
  • Perform functions such as
  • Automatically checking client PCs and video
    terminals for input/output activity
  • Assigning priorities to data communication
    requests from clients and terminals
  • Detecting and correcting transmission errors and
    other network problems
  • Sometimes functions as middleware that allows
    diverse networks to communicate with each other

31
14
Database Management Systems
  • Controls the development, use, and maintenance of
    databases.
  • Helps organizations use their integrated
    collections of data records and files
  • Allows different user application programs to
    easily access the same database
  • Simplifies the process of retrieving information
    from databases

32
14
Other System Management Programs
  • Utility Programs
  • Perform miscellaneous housekeeping and file
    conversion functions
  • Data backup
  • Data recovery
  • Virus protection
  • Data compression
  • Data defragmentation
  • Performance monitors and security monitors

33
14
Programming Languages
  • Allows a programmer to develop the sets of
    instructions that constitute a computer program
  • Machine Language
  • First generation language
  • Written using binary codes unique to each computer

34
14
Programming Languages (continued)
  • Assembler Language
  • Second generation
  • Requires language translator programs called
    assemblers
  • Allows a computer to convert the instructions
    into machine instructions
  • Frequently called symbolic language

35
14
Programming Languages (continued)
  • High-level Languages
  • Third generation
  • Uses instructions, called statements, that use
    brief statements or arithmetic expressions
  • Uses translator programs called compilers or
    interpreters
  • Syntax and semantics

36
14
Programming Languages (continued)
  • Fourth-generation Languages (4GLs)
  • More nonprocedural and conversational than prior
    languages
  • Natural languages
  • Ease of use gained at the expense of some loss in
    flexibility

37
14
Programming Languages (continued)
  • Object-Oriented Languages (OOP)
  • Ties data elements to the procedures or actions
    that will be performed on them into objects
  • Easier to use and more efficient for programming
    GUIs

38
14
Programming Languages (continued)
  • HTML, XML, and Java
  • Important for building multimedia Web pages,
    websites, and Web-based applications
  • HTML (Hypertext Markup Language)
  • A page description language that creates
    hypertext or hypermedia documents

39
14
Programming Languages (continued)
  • XML (extensible Markup Language)
  • Describes the contents of web pages by applying
    identifying tags or contextual labels to the data
  • Makes the web site more searchable, sort able,
    and easier to analyze
  • Java
  • Designed for real-time, interactive, Web-based
    network applications
  • Applets

40
14
Programming Software
  • Helps programmers develop computer programs
  • Two basic categories
  • Programming language translators
  • Programming tools

41
14
Programming Software (continued)
  • Language Translator Programs
  • Assembler
  • Translates symbolic instruction codes into
    machine language instructions
  • Compiler
  • Translates high-level language statements
  • Interpreter
  • Translates and executes each statement in a
    program one at a time

42
14
Programming Software (continued)
  • Programming Tools
  • Programming editors and debuggers
  • Provides a computer-aided programming environment
    or workbench
  • Diagramming packages
  • Code generators
  • Libraries of reusable objects code
  • Prototyping tools
  • CASE

43
14
Discussion Questions
  • What major trends are occurring in software?
    What capabilities do you expect to see in future
    software packages?
  • How do the different roles of system software and
    application software affect you as a business end
    user? How do you see this changing in the
    future?

44
14
Discussion Questions (continued)
  • Why is an operating system necessary? Why cant
    an end user just load an application program in a
    computer and start computing?
  • Should a Web browser be integrated into an
    operating system?

45
14
Discussion Questions (continued)
  • Are software suites, Web browsers, and groupware
    merging together? What are the implications for
    a business and its end users?
  • How are HTML, XML, and Java affecting business
    applications on the Web?

46
14
Discussion Questions (continued)
  • Do you think Windows 2000 and Linux will surpass
    Unix and Netware as operating systems for network
    and Web servers?
  • Which application software packages are the most
    important for a business end user to know how to
    use?

47
References
14
  • James A. O'Brien George M. Marakas.
    Management Information Systems Managing
    Information Technology in the Business Enterprise
    6th Ed., Boston McGraw-Hill/ Irwin,2004
About PowerShow.com