Distance Education and Learning Teams - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: Distance Education and Learning Teams


1
Distance Education and Learning Teams
  • Dr. R. B. Schultz

2
What is Distance Education?
  • Within a context of rapid technological change
    and shifting market conditions, the American
    education system is challenged with providing
    increased educational opportunities without
    increased budgets.
  • Many educational institutions are answering this
    challenge by developing distance education
    programs, sometimes called Online Learning.
  • At its most basic level, distance education takes
    place when a teacher and student(s) are separated
    by physical distance, and technology (i.e.,
    voice, video, data, and print), often in concert
    with face-to-face communication, is used to
    bridge the instructional gap.
  • These types of programs can provide adults with a
    second chance at a college education, reach those
    disadvantaged by limited time, distance or
    physical disability, and update the knowledge
    base of workers at their places of employment.

3
Participation in the Online Environment
  • Understanding what work is expected of you can be
    harder in the online environment because you do
    not have an instructor providing reminders about
    expectations each time you come to class.
  • As you take your online course you should be sure
    to

4
Participation in the Online Environment (cont.)
  • Check your schedule or syllabus for assigned
    papers and projects.
  • Know how to turn assignments in, and in what
    format.
  • Know what kind of weekly participation is
    required.

5
Participation in the Online Environment (cont.)
  • This online course has a schedule for assigned
    labs, projects and exams.
  • Many online courses, including this one, has
    multiple requirements for weekly participation,
    and some will require even more frequent
    contributions from you.
  • I will require that you post a minimum of three
    (3) thoughtful comments in the discussion forum
    each week.
  • More than three (3) thoughtful comments are good,
    more than three (3) poor comments is BAD!

6
Participation in the Online Environment (cont.)
  • You will be expected to read and comment on the
    work of other students in the discussion forum
    and on the group project.
  • Whatever the requirements of your particular
    instructor, when you begin your course, you want
    to be sure you are clear about the expectations
    for regular student involvement.

7
Participation in the Online Environment (cont.)
  • While it may sound like it is going to be a lot
    of work to take an online class (and it probably
    will be!), the high level of interaction and
    involvement also makes many students feel that
    they learn more during their online classes, and
    enjoy them more too!

8
Is Distance Education Effective?
  • Many educators ask if distant students learn as
    much as students receiving traditional
    face-to-face instruction.
  • Research comparing distance education to
    traditional face-to-face instruction indicates
    that teaching and studying at a distance can be
    as effective (if not, more effective) as
    traditional instruction,
  • when the method and technologies used are
    appropriate to the instructional tasks,
  • there is student-to-student interaction, and
  • when there is timely teacher-to- student feedback
    (see Moore Thompson, 1990 Verduin Clark,
    1991).

9
How is Distance Education Delivered?
  • A wide range of technological options are
    available to the distance educator. They fall
    into four major categories
  • Voice - Instructional audio tools include the
    interactive technologies of telephone, audio
    conferencing, and short-wave radio. Passive
    (i.e., one-way) audio tools include tapes and
    radio.
  • Video - Instructional video tools include still
    images such as slides, pre-produced moving images
    (e.g., film, videotape), and real-time moving
    images combined with audio conferencing (one-way
    or two-way video with two-way audio).
  • Data - Computers send and receive information
    electronically. For this reason, the term "data"
    is used to describe this broad category of
    instructional tools. Computer applications for
    distance education are varied and include

10
How is Distance Education Delivered? (cont.)
  • Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) - uses the
    computer as a self-contained teaching machine to
    present individual lessons.
  • Computer-managed instruction (CMI) - uses the
    computer to organize instruction and track
    student records and progress. The instruction
    itself need not be delivered via a computer,
    although CAI is often combined with CMI.
  • Computer-mediated education (CME) - describes
    computer applications that facilitate the
    delivery of instruction. Examples include
  • electronic mail, fax, real-time computer
    conferencing, and World-Wide Web applications.
  • Print - is a foundational element of distance
    education programs and the basis from which all
    other delivery systems have evolved. Various
    print formats are available including textbooks,
    study guides, workbooks, course syllabi, and case
    studies.

11
Which Technology is Best?
  • Although technology plays a key role in the
    delivery of distance education, educators must
    remain focused on instructional outcomes, not the
    technology of delivery.
  • The key to effective distance education is
    focusing on the needs of the learners, the
    requirements of the content, and the constraints
    faced by the instructor, before selecting a
    delivery system. Typically, this systematic
    approach will result in a mix of media, each
    serving a specific purpose.
  • Using an integrated approach, the educator's task
    is to carefully select among the technological
    options.
  • The goal is to build a mix of instructional
    media, meeting the needs of the learner in a
    manner that is instructionally effective and
    economically prudent.
  • That is what has been accomplished in this
    course.

12
What are Learning Teams?
  • Learning Teams are a means to create a network of
    information, communication, and commitment to
    support best practices in the classroom.
  • They are a small group interested in
    experimenting with new ideas and who meet
    regularly (either face-to-face or virtually) for
    a specific period of time to share professional
    growth experience guided by the goals and
    personal learning outcomes identified by the
    members of the group.
  • Learning Teams collaborate to share what they
    have learned in the online environment. They
    support learning through sharing successes and
    discussing strategies that have worked.
  • Learning teams are also a place to share
    challenges, examine their source and work
    together to find solutions. An online learning
    team provides a forum for self-paced learning,
    group planning, testing ideas, sharing insight
    and reflecting together around common goals.

13
How do Learning Teams support learning?
  • Humans are inherently social creatures. Social
    learning occurs all through life. Learning teams
    bring learners together in an environment which
    encourages social interaction as a means to
    acquire new knowledge and skills.
  • The Internet provides a system so that each
    learning team will have its own private work
    space or bulletin board, in this case, the
    BlackBoard Course Management System and
    Discussion Forum, where the members can work with
    each other in discussions, chats and the sharing
    of files.
  • The restricted team approach (five or less
    participants) provides safety for participants so
    that they feel comfortable sharing ideas.
  • A focus on collaborative, problem-based learning
    supports working towards common goals that all
    participants share.
  • Several minds working together will likely
    accomplish more than individuals working alone
    and in a much shorter time frame. Communicate
    and share!

14
How do Learning Teams support learning? (cont.)
  • A team approach draws upon the diverse and
    complementary expertise and skills of group
    members. It also encourages better situational
    analysis and provides for opportunities to
    generate new and innovative ideas. Workload can
    be shared thereby enabling a complex task to be
    completed more efficiently.
  • Time is a critical element for all of us. Online
    Learning Teams permit students to find solutions
    and acquire new understandings in collaboration
    with colleagues without taking themselves away
    from their workplace for extended periods of
    time. Group interactions can be scheduled at
    times most convenient to the group without
    concern for external agendas.
  • An online learning team is premised upon students
    drawing upon their own experiences to share
    insight and solutions as well as to apply newly
    acquired knowledge and skill to the course as it
    is learned. This student-centered, needs-driven
    approach to learning is sometimes referred to as
    just-in-time learning.

15
How do Learning Teams support learning? (cont.)
  • Keep in mind the following popular breakdown
  • We remember
  • 10 of what we read
  • 20 of what we hear
  • 30 of what we see
  • 40 of what we hear and see
  • 50 of what we discuss
  • 70 of what we experience
  • 95 of what we experience and share with others

16
What are the roles for Learning Team members?
  • Two common complaints that surface about
    team-based learning initiatives are that some
    team members do not do their share of the work
    while others dominate the process.
  • It is important in all group learning experiences
    for all members to do their part, and for
    everyone to be allowed to do their part.
  • If indeed there is a problem, I need to know from
    you PRIVATELY via e-mail of the situation.
  • The following roles are suggested as a structure
    to ensure that the various functions of group
    learning occur. Individuals within the learning
    team may be assigned a role. These may be rotated
    for blocks of time if the entire team agrees and
    finds it useful.

17
What are the roles for Learning Team members?
(cont.)
  • Summarizer Organizes and summarize information
    at different stages of the learning initiative
    examines the process in terms of accomplishments
    and group learning outcomes
  • Devil's Advocate Looks positively for the
    information gaps, procedural flaws, unsupported
    interpretations, extraneous directions, logical
    flaws in short provokes group members to
    challenge and explore.
  • Time Keeper Maintains the schedule for working
    as a team and coordinates with everyone to make
    sure they are participating and meeting the
    timelines agreed upon by the group as well as to
    mediate changes to the timeline.
  • Researcher Assumes a lead role to collect
    additional information and resources to address
    issues and challenges that arise within the
    group.
  • Writer/reporter Reviews processes and content
    with an eye to reporting on the experience at its
    conclusion.The Facilitator (professor)
  • Mentor Monitors group activities and is ready to
    intervene upon request from the group provided
    the benefit of expertise and access to additional
    resources.

18
Why do Learning Teams work?
  • To be successful, learning teams "sinks or swims
    together".
  • They
  • Provide support, encouragement, and assistance to
    each other in learning
  • Share knowledge and expertise with all team
    members and learn from each other and
  • Hold each other accountable for making the
    initiative work.
  • Provide for the infusion of new ideas
  • Offer the opportunity for learners to experiment
    with those ideas
  • Encourage the pooling of ideas and experience to
    solve challenges
  • Deliver benefits quickly
  • Build in enough flexibility to fit into diverse
    and busy schedules

19
Why do Learning Teams work?(cont.)
  • Learning teams also model the kind of learning
    environment that should exist in every classroom,
    wherein learners
  • Begin learning with a sense of what they already
    know
  • Learn at their own individual rates
  • Take the risk of trying new ideas
  • Monitor their successes
  • Maintain records of their improving competence
    and confidence
  • Feel a sense of personal accomplishment as they
    grow
  • Learning teams draw upon and pay homage to the
    professional commitment of both students and
    facilitators.

20
Your Learning Teams
  • We will now introduce our learning teams in this
    course.
  • Communicate frequently with your learning team
    members and share the work!
  • Remember, several people working together can do
    MUCH more than several individuals working alone!
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Title: Distance Education and Learning Teams


1
Distance Education and Learning Teams
  • Dr. R. B. Schultz

2
What is Distance Education?
  • Within a context of rapid technological change
    and shifting market conditions, the American
    education system is challenged with providing
    increased educational opportunities without
    increased budgets.
  • Many educational institutions are answering this
    challenge by developing distance education
    programs, sometimes called Online Learning.
  • At its most basic level, distance education takes
    place when a teacher and student(s) are separated
    by physical distance, and technology (i.e.,
    voice, video, data, and print), often in concert
    with face-to-face communication, is used to
    bridge the instructional gap.
  • These types of programs can provide adults with a
    second chance at a college education, reach those
    disadvantaged by limited time, distance or
    physical disability, and update the knowledge
    base of workers at their places of employment.

3
Participation in the Online Environment
  • Understanding what work is expected of you can be
    harder in the online environment because you do
    not have an instructor providing reminders about
    expectations each time you come to class.
  • As you take your online course you should be sure
    to

4
Participation in the Online Environment (cont.)
  • Check your schedule or syllabus for assigned
    papers and projects.
  • Know how to turn assignments in, and in what
    format.
  • Know what kind of weekly participation is
    required.

5
Participation in the Online Environment (cont.)
  • This online course has a schedule for assigned
    labs, projects and exams.
  • Many online courses, including this one, has
    multiple requirements for weekly participation,
    and some will require even more frequent
    contributions from you.
  • I will require that you post a minimum of three
    (3) thoughtful comments in the discussion forum
    each week.
  • More than three (3) thoughtful comments are good,
    more than three (3) poor comments is BAD!

6
Participation in the Online Environment (cont.)
  • You will be expected to read and comment on the
    work of other students in the discussion forum
    and on the group project.
  • Whatever the requirements of your particular
    instructor, when you begin your course, you want
    to be sure you are clear about the expectations
    for regular student involvement.

7
Participation in the Online Environment (cont.)
  • While it may sound like it is going to be a lot
    of work to take an online class (and it probably
    will be!), the high level of interaction and
    involvement also makes many students feel that
    they learn more during their online classes, and
    enjoy them more too!

8
Is Distance Education Effective?
  • Many educators ask if distant students learn as
    much as students receiving traditional
    face-to-face instruction.
  • Research comparing distance education to
    traditional face-to-face instruction indicates
    that teaching and studying at a distance can be
    as effective (if not, more effective) as
    traditional instruction,
  • when the method and technologies used are
    appropriate to the instructional tasks,
  • there is student-to-student interaction, and
  • when there is timely teacher-to- student feedback
    (see Moore Thompson, 1990 Verduin Clark,
    1991).

9
How is Distance Education Delivered?
  • A wide range of technological options are
    available to the distance educator. They fall
    into four major categories
  • Voice - Instructional audio tools include the
    interactive technologies of telephone, audio
    conferencing, and short-wave radio. Passive
    (i.e., one-way) audio tools include tapes and
    radio.
  • Video - Instructional video tools include still
    images such as slides, pre-produced moving images
    (e.g., film, videotape), and real-time moving
    images combined with audio conferencing (one-way
    or two-way video with two-way audio).
  • Data - Computers send and receive information
    electronically. For this reason, the term "data"
    is used to describe this broad category of
    instructional tools. Computer applications for
    distance education are varied and include

10
How is Distance Education Delivered? (cont.)
  • Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) - uses the
    computer as a self-contained teaching machine to
    present individual lessons.
  • Computer-managed instruction (CMI) - uses the
    computer to organize instruction and track
    student records and progress. The instruction
    itself need not be delivered via a computer,
    although CAI is often combined with CMI.
  • Computer-mediated education (CME) - describes
    computer applications that facilitate the
    delivery of instruction. Examples include
  • electronic mail, fax, real-time computer
    conferencing, and World-Wide Web applications.
  • Print - is a foundational element of distance
    education programs and the basis from which all
    other delivery systems have evolved. Various
    print formats are available including textbooks,
    study guides, workbooks, course syllabi, and case
    studies.

11
Which Technology is Best?
  • Although technology plays a key role in the
    delivery of distance education, educators must
    remain focused on instructional outcomes, not the
    technology of delivery.
  • The key to effective distance education is
    focusing on the needs of the learners, the
    requirements of the content, and the constraints
    faced by the instructor, before selecting a
    delivery system. Typically, this systematic
    approach will result in a mix of media, each
    serving a specific purpose.
  • Using an integrated approach, the educator's task
    is to carefully select among the technological
    options.
  • The goal is to build a mix of instructional
    media, meeting the needs of the learner in a
    manner that is instructionally effective and
    economically prudent.
  • That is what has been accomplished in this
    course.

12
What are Learning Teams?
  • Learning Teams are a means to create a network of
    information, communication, and commitment to
    support best practices in the classroom.
  • They are a small group interested in
    experimenting with new ideas and who meet
    regularly (either face-to-face or virtually) for
    a specific period of time to share professional
    growth experience guided by the goals and
    personal learning outcomes identified by the
    members of the group.
  • Learning Teams collaborate to share what they
    have learned in the online environment. They
    support learning through sharing successes and
    discussing strategies that have worked.
  • Learning teams are also a place to share
    challenges, examine their source and work
    together to find solutions. An online learning
    team provides a forum for self-paced learning,
    group planning, testing ideas, sharing insight
    and reflecting together around common goals.

13
How do Learning Teams support learning?
  • Humans are inherently social creatures. Social
    learning occurs all through life. Learning teams
    bring learners together in an environment which
    encourages social interaction as a means to
    acquire new knowledge and skills.
  • The Internet provides a system so that each
    learning team will have its own private work
    space or bulletin board, in this case, the
    BlackBoard Course Management System and
    Discussion Forum, where the members can work with
    each other in discussions, chats and the sharing
    of files.
  • The restricted team approach (five or less
    participants) provides safety for participants so
    that they feel comfortable sharing ideas.
  • A focus on collaborative, problem-based learning
    supports working towards common goals that all
    participants share.
  • Several minds working together will likely
    accomplish more than individuals working alone
    and in a much shorter time frame. Communicate
    and share!

14
How do Learning Teams support learning? (cont.)
  • A team approach draws upon the diverse and
    complementary expertise and skills of group
    members. It also encourages better situational
    analysis and provides for opportunities to
    generate new and innovative ideas. Workload can
    be shared thereby enabling a complex task to be
    completed more efficiently.
  • Time is a critical element for all of us. Online
    Learning Teams permit students to find solutions
    and acquire new understandings in collaboration
    with colleagues without taking themselves away
    from their workplace for extended periods of
    time. Group interactions can be scheduled at
    times most convenient to the group without
    concern for external agendas.
  • An online learning team is premised upon students
    drawing upon their own experiences to share
    insight and solutions as well as to apply newly
    acquired knowledge and skill to the course as it
    is learned. This student-centered, needs-driven
    approach to learning is sometimes referred to as
    just-in-time learning.

15
How do Learning Teams support learning? (cont.)
  • Keep in mind the following popular breakdown
  • We remember
  • 10 of what we read
  • 20 of what we hear
  • 30 of what we see
  • 40 of what we hear and see
  • 50 of what we discuss
  • 70 of what we experience
  • 95 of what we experience and share with others

16
What are the roles for Learning Team members?
  • Two common complaints that surface about
    team-based learning initiatives are that some
    team members do not do their share of the work
    while others dominate the process.
  • It is important in all group learning experiences
    for all members to do their part, and for
    everyone to be allowed to do their part.
  • If indeed there is a problem, I need to know from
    you PRIVATELY via e-mail of the situation.
  • The following roles are suggested as a structure
    to ensure that the various functions of group
    learning occur. Individuals within the learning
    team may be assigned a role. These may be rotated
    for blocks of time if the entire team agrees and
    finds it useful.

17
What are the roles for Learning Team members?
(cont.)
  • Summarizer Organizes and summarize information
    at different stages of the learning initiative
    examines the process in terms of accomplishments
    and group learning outcomes
  • Devil's Advocate Looks positively for the
    information gaps, procedural flaws, unsupported
    interpretations, extraneous directions, logical
    flaws in short provokes group members to
    challenge and explore.
  • Time Keeper Maintains the schedule for working
    as a team and coordinates with everyone to make
    sure they are participating and meeting the
    timelines agreed upon by the group as well as to
    mediate changes to the timeline.
  • Researcher Assumes a lead role to collect
    additional information and resources to address
    issues and challenges that arise within the
    group.
  • Writer/reporter Reviews processes and content
    with an eye to reporting on the experience at its
    conclusion.The Facilitator (professor)
  • Mentor Monitors group activities and is ready to
    intervene upon request from the group provided
    the benefit of expertise and access to additional
    resources.

18
Why do Learning Teams work?
  • To be successful, learning teams "sinks or swims
    together".
  • They
  • Provide support, encouragement, and assistance to
    each other in learning
  • Share knowledge and expertise with all team
    members and learn from each other and
  • Hold each other accountable for making the
    initiative work.
  • Provide for the infusion of new ideas
  • Offer the opportunity for learners to experiment
    with those ideas
  • Encourage the pooling of ideas and experience to
    solve challenges
  • Deliver benefits quickly
  • Build in enough flexibility to fit into diverse
    and busy schedules

19
Why do Learning Teams work?(cont.)
  • Learning teams also model the kind of learning
    environment that should exist in every classroom,
    wherein learners
  • Begin learning with a sense of what they already
    know
  • Learn at their own individual rates
  • Take the risk of trying new ideas
  • Monitor their successes
  • Maintain records of their improving competence
    and confidence
  • Feel a sense of personal accomplishment as they
    grow
  • Learning teams draw upon and pay homage to the
    professional commitment of both students and
    facilitators.

20
Your Learning Teams
  • We will now introduce our learning teams in this
    course.
  • Communicate frequently with your learning team
    members and share the work!
  • Remember, several people working together can do
    MUCH more than several individuals working alone!
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