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Meeting College and Career Readiness Standards and Expectations Session D Pages 24-31 Facilitator: Lois Barnes

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Title: Meeting College and Career Readiness Standards and Expectations Session D Pages 24-31 Facilitator: Lois Barnes


1
Meeting College and Career Readiness Standards
and ExpectationsSession DPages
24-31Facilitator Lois Barnes
HSTW
2
Do Now!Admit TicketComplete the following
sentence. Be creative!
  • Effective teaching is like (a) ___________________
    ___________________________
  •  because ______________________________________
    ________.

3
Score yourself on your Admit Ticket!
4
Key PracticeStudents Actively Engaged in
Relevant Instruction
HSTW
  • Engage all students in academic and
    career/technical classrooms in rigorous and
    challenging proficient-level assignments using
    research-based instructional strategies and
    technology.

5
EFFORT vs. ABILITY
  • We have to believe before students can believe
    that hard work pays off, that effort matters,
    that success depends not on your genes but on
    your sweat. What we GIVE to the BEST, we want for
    the REST!

6
Work Harder to Get Smarter
  • We need to change our thinking and our language
    from
  • an ability-based learning model to an
    effort-based learning model.
  • punishment to encouragement and extra help
    in order to complete work.

7
A New Mind-set Is Needed
  • Many people believe that a person is born either
    smart, average or dumb and stays that way for
    life.
  • But new research shows that the brain is more
    like a muscle It changes and gets stronger when
    you use it.

Source The New Psychology of Success, 2006
8
Classroom Practices that Engage ALL StudentsUse
of varied learning activities linked to
challenging academic content and opportunities to
use new skills and concepts in real-world
applications
9
Student EngagementWhy?
  • The more interesting an assignment is, the more
    likely students are to complete it.
  • Students are more engaged when they can build on
    prior knowledge and see connections to the world
    they live in.
  • Even small opportunities for choice give students
    a greater sense of autonomy.
  • Students are more engaged when sharing what they
    are learning is needed by others in the group to
    complete an assignment.

10
Student Engagement Is
  • A challenging assignment that stretches students
    to develop ideas and think
  • Choosing a topic students want to learn more
    about
  • Having students go on stage to present
    something they have learned very well.
  • Students working collaboratively

11
Student Engagement Is Not
  • Drill sheets
  • Copying notes from the board or overhead
  • Answering questions at the end of a chapter
  • Activity for activitys sake

12
School Leaders Can Support
HSTW
  • All teachers in engaging students in reading,
    writing, making presentations, using technology,
    and applying high-level problem-solving and
    thinking skills.
  • Mathematics, science and career/technical
    teachers working together to better align and
    integrate concepts and skills into assignments
    and assessments.

13
Table Teams
  • Review your current status related to
    Research-based Instructional Strategies and
    determine one outstanding practice in place.
  • See planner page 25.

14
A Rigorous and Challenging Academic Core
CurriculumAll students should be taught the
essential concepts of the college-preparatory
curriculum.
15
RIGOR
  • ...is the goal of helping ALL students develop
    the capacity to understand content that is
    complex, ambiguous, provocative, and personally
    or emotionally challenging.

Source Teaching What Matters Most Standards and
Strategies for Raising Student Achievement by
Richard W. Strong, Harvey F. Silver and Matthew
J. Perini, ASCD, 2001
16
What Rigor Is and Is Not
17
Rigorous and ChallengingWhy?
  • Rigorous coursework is the best predictor of
    achievement.
  • It provides focus and addresses college- and
    career-readiness
  • It teaches ALL students the content historically
    taught to the top students.

18
Rigorous and ChallengingWhy?
  • Rigorous coursework engages ALL students with
    content that is aligned to state, national, and
    international standards.
  • ALL students need to apply knowledge to
    real-world problems.

19
SREBs Literacy Goals
HSTW
  • Students will
  • read the equivalent of 25 books per year across
    the curriculum
  • write weekly in all classes
  • use reading and writing strategies to enhance
    their learning in all classes
  • write research papers in all classes
  • be taught as if they were in honors language arts
    classes

20
HSTW
Fifteen Literacy Strategies Any Teacher Can and
Should Use
  • Admit slips
  • Exit slips
  • Double entry or two column notes
  • ReQuest
  • Interactive CLOZE
  • Cubing
  • Open-response questions A KEY

21
HSTW
Fifteen Literacy Strategies Any Teacher Can and
Should Use
8. KWL charts 9. Metaphorical Thinking 10. Jigsaw
reading 11. Paired Reading 12. Graphic
organizers 13. GIST 14. WordSplash/Capsule
Vocabulary 15. RAFT
22
Key Indicators for Literacy
HSTW
  • Students
  • Often used word-processing software to complete
    an assignment or project
  • Often revised their essays or other written work
    several times to improve their quality
  • Sometimes or often were asked to write in-depth
    explanations about a class project or activity
  • Discussed or debated with other students each
    about what they read in English or language arts
    classes at least each month
  • Read and interpreted technical books or manuals
    at least weekly to complete assignments in CTE
    areas (CTE Students only)

23
What do you think the 100 most improved schools
did to engage more students in literacy across
the curriculum?
Source 2006 HSTW Assessment
24
What do you think the 100 most improved schools
did to engage more students in literacy across
the curriculum?
25
Literacy Experiences Across the Curriculum and
Higher Reading Achievement
Source 2006 HSTW Assessment and Student Survey
26
Table Teams
  • Review your current status related to Literacy
    and determine one outstanding practice in place.
  • Determine one action for year 1, year 2 and year
    3 the school can take to get students to read 25
    books a year, write weekly in all classes, use
    reading and writing strategies to learn content
    in all classes and write at least one research
    paper in each class.
  • Pages 25-26 and planning page 27

27

Rigorous and Challenging Mathematics
Curriculum--Why?
  • Success in mathematics is a gateway to higher
    education and higher earnings.
  • Almost two out of five eighth-graders scoring in
    the lowest two quartiles in math fail whatever
    math course they take in grade nine.
  • Completing a challenging mathematics curriculum
    is essential for postsecondary and career.
  • Far too many students repeat sixth-grade math
    content in grades seven and eight.
  • One-third to one-half of students leave eighth
    grade performing below grade level.

28
Numeracy Across the Curriculum Indicators
HSTW
  • Took a math class during the senior year.
  • Took at least four math courses in grades 9-12.
  • Math teachers sometimes or often show how math
    concepts are used to solve problems in real life.
  • Use a graphing calculator to solve a problem at
    least monthly.
  • Complete a math project at least monthly using
    math in a way that would be used in a work
    setting.

29
Numeracy Across the Curriculum Indicators
HSTW
  • Orally defend a process used to solve a problem
    at least monthly.
  • Worked with other students at least monthly on a
    challenging math assignment group and
    individual grade.
  • Worked in groups to brainstorm how to solve a
    problem at least monthly.
  • Solved math problems with more than one possible
    answer at least monthly.
  • Solved non-textbook math problems at least
    monthly.
  • Used math to complete CT assignments at least
    monthly.

30
Numeracy Experiences Across the Curriculum and
Higher Mathematics Achievement
Source 2006 HSTW Assessment and Student Survey
31
What Can Teachers Do?
  • Focus on meaning.
  • Emphasize the mathematical meanings of ideas and
    connect ideas other mathematical concepts in a
    logically consistent and sensible manner. Noah
    Newcomer
  • Make explicit the connections between mathematics
    and other subjects.
  • Teach new concepts and skills while solving
    problems.
  • Encourage students to find their own solution
    methods.
  • Offer students a healthy combination of discovery
    learning and practice in mathematics.
  • Provide quality cooperative learning opportunities

32
Actions to Increase Mathematics Achievement
  • Determine actions you can take to
  • Link mathematics to real life
  • Use technology
  • Complete math projects
  • Students work in teams
  • Numeracy across curriculum
  • Solve real world problems
  • Integrate math into science and career/tech
    courses

33
Standards Based Units that Address Numeracy
Across the Curriculum
HSTW
  • Teachers create units of study aligned to
    standards in all classes
  • Unit plans should include the following
  • Standard or standards addressed
  • Level of intellectual demandmove beyond recall
    procedural skills to analysis and application
  • Major assignments to be given
  • Outline the major study skills addressed
    literacy skills and the research-based
    instructional strategies

34
Standards Based Units that Address Numeracy
Across the Curriculum
HSTW
  • Increase student use of math skills in all
    content areaswith special emphasis in science,
    CT courses, physical education, athletics
  • For example
  • Students orally defend a process they used to
    solve a math problem
  • Students work in groups to solve math problems

35
Table Teams
  • Review your current status related to numeracy
    and determine one outstanding practice in place.
  • Determine one action for year 1, year 2 and year
    3 the school can take to get
  • All seniors enrolled in math
  • Teachers to use more real-world problems,
    technology and cooperative learning
  • Teachers to create units of study based upon
    college and career readiness standards
  • Integrate math into career/technical and science
    classes
  • See page 26 and planning page 27

36
Rigorous and Challenging Science Curriculum--Why?
  • Science strengthens our problem-solving and
    critical thinking abilities.
  • Science drives reading achievement and provides a
    context for mathematics.
  • Science enables us to make wise personal and
    environmental decisions.
  • Science helps us to comprehend the natural world.
  • Science is linked to the economic productivity of
    our society.

37
Significantly More Students in 2004 than in 2002
Experienced High-quality Science Instruction
38
Actions to Increase Science Achievement
  • Determine actions you can take to
  • Have students do a major lab activity every two
    weeks
  • Write about what they have learned from the lab
    activity
  • Read science related articles
  • Design and conduct scientific investigations
  • Analyze and defend findings from investigations
  • Complete a science project
  • Planner Page 27

39
Table Teams
HSTW
  • Review your current status related to science
    instruction and determine one outstanding
    practice in place
  • Determine one action for Year 1, Year 2 and Year
    3 the school can take to get students to
  • Take at least 3 CP Science courses (4 in a block)
  • Conduct frequent labs in science classes and
    write about what they learn
  • Read science-related articles science
  • Design and conduct scientific investigations in
    all classes
  • Analyze and defend findings from investigations
  • See page 26 and planning page 27

40
Key PracticeHigh Expectations Motivate more
students to meet high expectations by integrating
high expectations into classroom practices and
giving students frequent feedback. When he
wrote, Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he
shall never be disappointed, Alexander Pope
could have been describing the expectations that
some teachers at non-improved schools have for
their students nothing.
HSTW
41
Active Engaging InstructionLiteracy Strategy
HSTW
  • Four Corners
  • Students should be given opportunities to redo
    work so that their grade is not affected by the
    number of times it takes to achieve the standard.

42
Why Raise Expectations?
HSTW
  • Communicate that high school counts
  • Give students a sense of self-worth
  • Help students see that the school believes in
    them
  • Help students be more focused, motivated and
    goal-oriented
  • Prepare students for the next level

43
High ExpectationsThe school expects high-quality
work from all students and all students
participate in challenging classes.
44
High Expectations Couples withExtra Help and
Extra TimeThe school uses a systematic approach
to identify struggling students and provides
extra help and assistance in multiple ways.
45
Marzanos Effort RubricA Continuum of Effort
46
High Expectation Practices andHigher Achievement
Source 2006 HSTW Assessment and Student Survey
47
High Expectation Practices andHigher Achievement
Source 2006 HSTW Assessment and Student Survey
48
  • Why do you think some students are in classrooms
    with high expectations while others are not?

49
Key Indicators That A School Has High
Expectations
HSTW
  • More students perceive that
  • Courses are exciting and challenging
  • They often try to do their best work
  • They seldom or never fail to complete assignments
  • Teachers often encourage them to do well in school

50
HSTW
Key Indicators That A School Has High
Expectations
  • More students perceive that
  • Teachers often showed they care by not letting
    them get by without doing the work.
  • It is very important to study hard to get good
    grades.
  • It is very important to participate actively in
    and attend all classes.
  • It is very important to take a lot of
    college-preparatory classes.

51
Different Strategies for Agreeing on A-, B- and
C-level Work
  • Use basic, proficient and advanced
  • NAEP National Readiness Standards
  • Use select universities, regional universities,
    community college and high school graduation
  • Use procedural/comprehension, application/analysis
    , and analysis/synthesis
  • Intellectual (Webb/Bloom)

52
Actions for Defining the Amount and Quality of
Work Expected
  • Benchmark assignments and assessment to
    proficient level/grade level
  • Develop common course syllabi, rubrics and
    end-of-course exams
  • A, B, C, Not-yet grading scale
  • Power of I details follow

53
What does the Power of I look like?
  • Students no longer receive zeros when work isnt
    turned in they dont have an option not to turn
    in work
  • Students must be given extra help opportunities
    (required) to complete the work during the school
    day (not during the class) or after school.
  • Students cannot receive an A (or a B in some
    schools) on any assignment that is late or turned
    in incomplete.
  • Students never receive an F if an assignment is
    completed within the year or semester

54
Actions to Make Homework of Value
  • Multiple formats for homework include short-term
    practice and long-term high level projects
  • Study groups established so students can get
    support
  • Homework crosses multiple curricular areas and
    students receive credit in each area
  • Teachers communicate that homework is important
  • School establishes and communicates a clear
    homework policy

55
College Readiness
  • SAT scores
  • 500 or higher ready for college level work
  • Below 450 remediation
  • Select universities (1100 score for acceptance)
  • ACT College-readiness Benchmarks
  • English 18
  • Reading 21
  • Mathematics 22
  • Science 24

56
Actions for Revising Work
  • Three-week assessment
  • Requiring extra help for those not meeting
    standards
  • Teachers do not let students get by without doing
    work

57
Raising Expectations
  • Review your current status related to the key
    practices and determine one outstanding practice
    in place
  • Determine one major action your school can take
    to establish common expectations for A, B and C
    work
  • Determine one major action your school can take
    to get students to redo work until it meets
    standards
  • Determine one additional major action to further
    raise expectations at your school
  • Note Actions should be measurable
  • Workbook pages 28-29
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