LANGUAGE RICH PRESCHOOL ENVIRONMENTS: An Essential in Learning to Read - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – LANGUAGE RICH PRESCHOOL ENVIRONMENTS: An Essential in Learning to Read PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 3c1302-YzQzM



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

LANGUAGE RICH PRESCHOOL ENVIRONMENTS: An Essential in Learning to Read

Description:

LANGUAGE RICH PRESCHOOL ENVIRONMENTS: An Essential in Learning to Read Alabama Early Intervention & Preschool Conference November 20, 2008 Mobile, Alabama – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:286
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 97
Provided by: ucpconfer
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: LANGUAGE RICH PRESCHOOL ENVIRONMENTS: An Essential in Learning to Read


1
LANGUAGE RICH PRESCHOOL ENVIRONMENTS An
Essential in Learning to Read
  • Alabama Early Intervention Preschool Conference
  • November 20, 2008
  • Mobile, Alabama

2
Todays Workshop The abilities to listen, speak,
read and write emerge interdependently
  • Language Development
  • Phonological Awareness
  • Print Awareness and Concepts
  • Early Writing
  • Alphabet Knowledge

And these are essential pre-requisites in
learning to read and to having a successful K-12
educational experience.
3
Embargoed for Release Friday, November 14,
2008 1201 a.m. EST
A study funded by the National Institutes of
Health and other federal agencies shows that it's
possible to teach preschoolers the pre-reading
skills they need for later school success, while
at the same time fostering the socials skills
necessary for making friends and avoiding
conflicts with their peers. The findings address
long standing concerns on whether preschool
education programs should emphasize academic
achievement or social and emotional development.
The new program is known as the REDI
(Research-Based, Developmentally Informed) Head
Start program. The researchers developed the REDI
curriculum by combining a program that fosters
social and emotional development (Preschool
PATHS) with curriculum components that promote
language development and pre-reading skills.
Children in the REDI program also scored higher
than children in the traditional program on
several tests of pre-reading skills vocabulary,
blending letter sounds together to form words,
separating words into their component letter
sounds, and in naming the letters of the
alphabet.
4
Our Focus.
  • Getting children ready to read

5
Your Guidelines
  • ALSDE Continuums

6
LANGUAGE AND LITERACY Receptive Language Students
will LL.P.1 Follow two-step directions
Objective LL.P.1.1 Respond verbally to a
one-step direction such as tell me your
name Objective LL.P.1.2 Point to/choose picture
of object when directed Objective LL.P.1.3 Point
to body part or object when directed Objective
LL.P.1.3 Turn head toward adult when
directed Objective LL.P.1.4 Sustain eye contact
when directed look at me LL.P.2 Listen
attentively to stories or group conversations
Objective LL.P.2.1 Show interest in stories or
conversations by facial expression Objective
LL.P.2.2 Turn head toward speaker to indicate
interest in story, conversation Expressive
Language Students will LL.P.3 Express wants
and needs Objective LL.P.3.1 Verbally request
drink/food/activity Objective LL.P.3.2 Verbally
express need to potty Objective LL.P.3.3 Verbally
respond to simple yes/no questions LL.P.4
Respond to questions using verbal communication
Objective LL.P.4.1 Answer simple wh questions
verbally Objective LL.P.4.2 Respond to questions
verbally with yes /no LL.P.5 Name a variety
of pictures/objects and actions Objective
LL.P.5.1 Point to and name simple actions
(run) Objective LL.P.5.2 Point to and name
pictures/objects Objective LL.P.5.3 Point to
picture/object when requested by name LL.P.6
Initiate conversations with peers and adults
Objective LL.P.6.1 Participate in conversations
with others Objective LL.P.6.2 Deliver
simple messages Objective LL.P.6.3 Express
wants/needs Objective LL.P.6.4 Use jargon as if
talking LL.P.7 Speak in 3-4 word sentences
LL.P.8 Imitates simple songs/nursery
rhymes/finger plays LL.P.9 Retell simple
stories
CONTINUUM GUIDE Developmental Standards for
Preschool Children With Disabilities ALSDE
7
Phonological Awareness Students will LL.P.10
Discriminate and identify sounds in spoken
language Objective LL.P.10.1 Identify target
sounds in words Objective LL.P.10.2 Correctly
produce sounds p,m,h,n,w by age three and
correctly produce sounds b,k,g,d,f,y by age
four Objective LL.P.10.3 Produce sounds in
words Objective LL.P.10.4 Identify environmental
sounds (bell, clock) spontaneously Objective
LL.P.10.5 Imitate sounds in vocal play (say
ma-ma) Objective LL.P.10.6 Imitate non speech
sounds Objective LL.P.10.7 Respond to sounds by
turning head Objective LL.P.10.8 Make coos and
gurgles LL.P.11 Identify rhyming words
Objective LL.P.11.1 Identify two words that
rhyme Objective LL.P.11.2 Identify by pointing
two objects that start with the same sound
Objective LL.P.11.3 Make up nonsense words and
silly names Objective LL.P.11.4 Imitate rhyming
sounds Objective LL.P.11.5 Listen to rhymes
LL.P.12 Recognize common sounds at the
beginning of a series of words Objective
LL.P.12.1 Identify two objects that start with
the same sound when requested Objective
LL.P.12.2 Identify two sounds as being alike or
different Objective LL.P.12.3 Imitate sounds
such as b while being shown picture of a
ball LL.P.13 Identify syllables in words
Objective LL.P.13.1 Clap to 2-syllable words
with assistance Objective LL.P.13.2 Imitate
clapping of syllables
CONTINUUM GUIDE Developmental Standards for
Preschool Children With Disabilities ALSDE
8
Print Awareness and Concepts Students
will LL.P.14 Use emerging reading skills to
explore the use of print and to construct meaning
Objective LL.P.14.1 State name of
food container/wrapper Objective LL.P.14.2 Match
item to associated container Objective
LL.P.14.3 Recognize common commercial
environmental symbols Objective LL.P.14.4
Point to letters upon request Objective LL.P.14.5
Put picture in finished box on daily
schedule Objective LL.P.14.6 Sit in circle during
story time LL.P.15 Understand that writing is
a form of communication for a variety of purposes
Objective LL.P.15.1 Recognize own name on
bulletin board Objective LL.P.15.2 Pretend to
read by looking at pictures in books Objective
LL.P.15.3 Identify sign symbols (i.e., stop
sign, boys/girls restroom) Objective LL.P.15.4
Turn pages in books LL.P.16 Orients picture
book correctly and turns pages one by one
Objective LL.P.16.1 Choose a book for
teacher Objective LL.P.16.2 Choose a book and
look at the pictures while adult turns
pages Objective LL.P.16.3 Choose a book and
orient with assistance from adult
CONTINUUM GUIDE Developmental Standards for
Preschool Children With Disabilities ALSDE
9
Early Writing Student will LL.P.17 Experiment
with a variety of writing tools and materials
Objective LL.P.17.1 Use writing tools
appropriately Objective LL.P.17.2 Imitate
vertical/horizontal lines, circles, cross and
X Objective LL.P.17.3 Color a simple picture
in the lines Objective LL.P.17.4 Draw a
picture that is meaningful to the child Objective
LL.P.17.5 Scribble on paper seldom going off
paper Objective LL.P.17.6 Make marks on
paper Objective LL.P.17.7 Hold writing tool in
a fisted or immature grip LL.P.18 Write some
recognizable letters, especially those in own
name Objective LL.P.18.1 Print name without
visual cue Objective LL.P.18.2 Copy uppercase
letters Objective LL.P.18.3 Trace uppercase
letters Objective LL.P.18.4 Recognize and name
letters of alphabet Objective LL.P.18.5 Recognize
and name letters of own name
CONTINUUM GUIDE Developmental Standards for
Preschool Children With Disabilities ALSDE
10
Alphabet Knowledge Students will LL.P.19
Demonstrate awareness of letters in
print Objective LL.P.19.1 Name letters upon
request Objective LL.P.19.2 Point to letters when
directed Objective LL.P.19.3 Match
letters Objective LL.P.19.4 Turn book right
side up Objective LL.P.19.5 Look at a
book LL.P.20 Relate at least 10 letters to the
specific sounds they represent Objective
LL.P.20.1 Identify the sounds of 10
letters Objective LL.P.20.2 Imitate the sounds of
10 letters Objective LL.P.20.3 Point to the
letter of the sound made by teacher Objective
LL.P.20.4 Look at letter of sound made by teacher
from choice to two
CONTINUUM GUIDE Developmental Standards for
Preschool Children With Disabilities ALSDE
11
There are Many Players Involved in Helping
Students Learn to Read
  • the likelihood that a child will succeed in the
    first grade depends most of all on how much she
    or he has already learned about reading before
    getting there
  • Dr. Marilyn Adams, from Beginning to Read

12
  • Some people there are who, being grown, forget
    the horrible task of learning to read. It is
    perhaps the greatest single effort that the human
    undertakes, and he must do it as a child.
  • - John Steinbeck, 1982 Nobel Prize Winner for
    Literature

13
What is EARLY LITERACY?
  • Early literacy is what children know about
    reading before they can actually read.
  • Early literacy is pre-reading skills.
  • Early literacy is reading readiness.

14
Why Starting Early?
  • Learning to read is essential for school success
  • Children should get ready to read long before
    they start to school
  • Research shows that children who are read to from
    an early age have a larger vocabulary and better
    language skills when they start school
  • Children who struggle with Phonological
    Awarenessa pre-reading skilloften struggle
    learning to read.

15
Babies and Toddlers
What do they do?
  • Babble, Explore, Listen, Understand
  • Imitate adults siblings, Play with toys, Begin
    to say words
  • Listen to rhymes music


2 and 3 Year-Olds
  • Talk, Scribble, Color, Shapes
  • Sing songs
  • Turn pages in a book
  • Talk about pictures
  • Pretend to read
  • Ask lots of questions

Four Five Year Olds
  • Play, talk a lot, imitate
  • Curious and ask lots of questions
  • Pretend to read books, Read books
  • Like to build things, play make-believe
  • Like to know how things work

All of these are part of EARLY LITERACY!
16
  • L a n g u a g e
  • and
  • V o c a b u l a r y
  • D e v e l o p m e n t

17
The Importance of the Early Years in Vocabulary
and Language Development
  • How early does a child begin to learn language?
  • From the day of birth, a childs brain is
    receptive to learning language
  • Children learn to speak by being surrounded by
    speech
  • The size of a toddlers vocabulary is strongly
    correlated with how much parents talk to the
    child
  • Your habits of talking and listening will make a
    difference in your childs language development

18
Babies Toddlers


What do you do?
What do they do?
  • Babble
  • Explore
  • Imitate
  • Play
  • Understand
  • Listen
  • Begin to say words
  • Read! Read! Read
  • Model
  • Sing
  • Talk

All of these are a part of EARLY LITERACY!
19
2 and 3 Year-Olds
What do they do?
What do you do?
  • Talk
  • Scribble
  • Color
  • Shapes
  • Sing songs
  • Turn pages in a book
  • Talk about pictures
  • Pretend to read
  • Ask lots of questions
  • Read! Read! Read!
  • Talk
  • Model
  • Ask questions

All of these are part of EARLY LITERACY!
20
Four Five Year Olds
What do they do?
What do you do?
  • Play
  • Talk
  • Curious
  • Ask lots of questions
  • Imitate
  • Pretend to read
  • Read
  • Build
  • Make-believe
  • Read! Read! Read
  • Talk! Talk! Talk
  • Play
  • Model
  • Ask lots of questions

All of these are part of EARLY LITERACY!
21
Receptive Language
  • Follow Directions
  • Listen Attentively

22
The Importance of the Early Years
  • How early does a child begin to learn language?
  • From the day of birth, a childs brain is
    receptive to learning language.
  • The size of a toddlers vocabulary is strongly
    correlated with how much a mother talks to the
    child.
  • Children learn to speak by being surrounded by
    speech
  • Habits of talking and listening will make a
    difference of in a childs language development

23
Expressive Language
  • Expresses wants and needs
  • Responds to questions
  • Names pictures/objects
  • Initiates conversations
  • Speaks in sentences
  • Imitates songs/rhymes/finger plays
  • Retells simple stories

24
Phonological Awareness
  • Discriminate and identify sounds in spoken
    language
  • Identify rhyming words
  • Recognize common sounds at the beginning of a
    series of words
  • Identify syllables in words

25
Our children begin the process of reading EARLY
26
by climbing the ladder of Phonemic Awareness
skills.
Pre-First Grade Skills
27
P h o n e m i c A w a r e n e s s Activities
28
How to help your child with Phonemic Awareness
  • Direct teaching of specific sounds
  • Clapping games
  • Rhyming games
  • What do you hear? games
  • Stretching and shrinking

29
Activity 2
Listening to Sequences of Sounds
  • Activity 1
  • What you need
  • Objects that make interesting, distinctive
    sounds.
  • Examples
  • Banging on wall/table/lap Snapping fingers
  • Blowing a whistle Crumbling paper
  • Blowing nose Drumming with fingers
  • Clapping Eating an apple
  • Clicking with tongue Noisy chewing
  • Pouring liquid Tearing paper
  • Rubbing hands together Stirring with a teaspoon
  • Slamming a book Hammering
  • Sharpening a pencil Coughing
  • Cutting with scissors Writing on blackboard

30
Listening to Sequences of Sounds
  • Activity 2
  • What do your do?
  • Ask the children to cover their eyes and listen
    to and identify the sound they hear
  • Once the children have caught on to the game,
    make two noises, one after the other.
  • Without peeking, the children are to guess the
    two sounds in sequence saying, There are two
    sounds. First we heard a _______, and then we
    heard a _______.
  • After the children can identify a sequence of two
    sounds, increase the number of sounds in
    sequence.

31
Activity 3 Counting Words in a Sentence
  • What You Need
  • 5-7 objects-blocks, coins, fruit loops, MMs
  • What Do You Do
  • You say a sentence
  • Ask the child to repeat the sentence. As she says
    each word, show her how to move one object for
    each word to position the objects in a line.
  • Then ask her to count the objects. That is the
    number of words in this sentence.
  • Increase the number of words in the sentence as
    she understands the task.

Sample Sentences
The big horse jumps. A fish can swim fast. A cow
jumps over the moon.
The dog barks. A cat scratches. The brown dog
sleeps
32
Activity 4 Un-Compound That Word
  • What You Do
  • You say a compound word.
  • Ask the child to repeat it.
  • Then ask the child to say what word remind if you
    omit one portion.
  • The child pronounces the word that is left.
  • Examples
  • Cowboy Say it again without the boy cow
  • Outside Say it again without the out. side
  • Grasshopper Say it again without the
    grass. hopper
  • Jellyfish Say it again without the fish jelly
  • Zookeeper Say it again without the zoo. keeper
  • Rattlesnake Say it again without the
    snake rattle
  • Cupcake Say it again without the cake. cup
  • Dishwasher Say it again without the dish washer
  • Horsefly Say it again without the horse fly
  • Baseball Say it again without the base ball
  • Campground Say it again without the ground camp

33
Activity 5
  • Hearing Rhyming Words
  • What You Do
  • Say each pair or words below and ask the child to
    repeat them and tell you if the words rhyme.
    They rhyme if all the sounds are the same except
    the beginning sound.
  • Start down the first column for the easiest
    pairs, followed by the middle, and then the right
    column
  • Do a few at a time - not all at once.

34
Whew! Now the Phonics Ladder of Skills!
35
Pre-First Grade Skills
36
Print Awareness Concepts
  • Explore the use of print and to construct meaning
  • Understand that writing is a form of
    communication for a variety of purposes
  • Orient picture books correctly and turn pages one
    by one

37
What is Print Awareness?
  • Knowledge that people read the text, not just
    look at the pictures
  • Awareness of how to read a book-right side up,
    starting with the first page and continuing to
    the end the left page is read first, and the
    text is read from left to right
  • Understanding that words are units separated by
    white spaces

38
Ways to Help Children Develop Print Awareness
39
Early Writing
  • Experiment with a variety of writing tools and
    materials
  • Write some recognizable letters, especially those
    in own name

40
Early Writing
http//www.handwritingforkids.com Basic strokes
for handwriting
41
Alphabet Knowledge
  • Demonstrate awareness of letters in print
  • Relate at least 10 letters to the specific sounds
    they represent

42
What Do Children Need to Know to Be Ready to
Read?
  • Knowledge
  • of the

P
E
A
A
L
H
B
T
43
What is Knowledge of the Alphabet?
  • Being able to recognize and name all the letters
    of the alphabet

44
How Important is It to Teach Children the
Alphabet?
  • The importance of being able to name and
    recognize the letters has long been misunderstood
    by parents.
  • For many years parents have believed that thy had
    to do two things to prepare their child for
    school
  • Teach their child the alphabet
  • Read, read, read to their child
  • Knowing the alphabet is necessary, but not
    sufficient to learning to read.
  • One of the most important things your child needs
    to accomplish during kindergarten is to learn the
    sounds associated with letters. Knowing the
    alphabet can make learning the sounds easier.

45
The Recommended Order of Skills
  • Most educators recommend teaching the skills
    in the following order
  • NAMES Recite/Sing the ABCs
  • SHAPES This is a B
  • SOUNDS This is a B and it says /b/

46
Should We Teach 4 Year Olds to Write Letters?
  • Yes
  • If you teach correct letter formation
  • If your child has good control of their finger
    muscles
  • No
  • If your teach them incorrectly and they develop
    bad habits
  • If they have not developed finger strength and
    dexterity

47
Alphabet Knowledge
48
Ways to Help Children Develop Alphabet Skills
49
Activity 1 Counting, Matching, and Naming
Letters
P
A
F
G
  • What You Need
  • Set of plastic alphabet letters-preferable
    capital letters
  • Mat that you make on an 11 x 17 piece of firm
    paper. Trace the plastic letters and fill them
    in, in an arc shape, so that the plastic letters
    will fit over the letters written on the arc.
    The arc should extend from the lower left to the
    lower right corner.
  • What You Do
  • Ask you child to count how many letters there
    are.
  • Then ask your child to place the plastic letters
    on the matching letters on the arc of the mat.
  • Teach her the name of each letter, introducing
    about four new letters per day. For example,
    This is the letter A.
  • After she can differentiate the letter shapes and
    has been taught the names of each letter, ask her
    to say the name of the letter as she places it in
    the position on the arc.
  • Repeat often, until your child can recognize each
    letter, place it over the corresponding symbol on
    the arc on the mat, and say the name of each
    letter. Generally, it takes several weeks for a
    child to master all the letters.

50
Activity 2 Learning The Sequence of the
Alphabet
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
A
C
F
E
X
P
C
G
  • What You Need
  • Set of plastic alphabet letters
  • A slightly different mat made on an 11 x 17
    piece of firm paper. List the letters in order in
    a straight line across the top to provide a
    reference for the child. This time, instead of
    the letters composing the arc, draw a line to
    form the arc. Then provide three anchors by
    writing the letter A at the lower left corner of
    the arc, the letter Z at the lower right, and M
    and N at the midway point at the top of the arc.
  • What You Do
  • Ask your child to take the plastic letters out of
    the container and place them right side up in the
    center of the arc.
  • Then ask her to find the A and place it.
  • Next find the Z and place it, followed by the M
    and N.
  • The child then begins with B, Then C, and so on,
    placing all the letters in order along the arc.
  • When your child has finished sequencing the
    letters, ask her to check it by touching and
    naming each letter, starting with A and moving to
    Z. The alphabet across the top of the mat can
    serve as an additional reminder.
  • Repeat this activity frequently until the child
    can place all the letters in the proper order
    within two minutes. Generally, it takes several
    weeks for a child to master this task.

51
Activity 3 Guess the Letter
  • What You Need
  • Two sets of plastic alphabet letters-preferably
    capital letters
  • Two 11 c 17 mats with or without the letters
    filled in on the arc
  • Two brown paper bags, or cloth bags, big enough
    to hold the letters
  • What You Do
  • This is a game that two children can play
    together or you can play with your child. The
    object is to try to correctly identify and name
    the letters based on felling them without
    looking. The winner is the first player to fill
    in all the letters on her arc.
  • The first player reaches into a brown paper bag
    and feels a plastic letter without looking at it.
    If she can correctly name it, then she gets to
    place it on the arc on her mat and choose another
    letter. She continues choosing letters until she
    makes a mistake.
  • Once a mistake is made, the turn rotates to the
    next player
  • The player who successfully identifies and places
    all the letters on her arc is the winner.

52
Activity 4 Snakey Letters
  • What You Need
  • Modeling clay or cookie dough
  • What You Do
  • Roll the pieces of clay or dough into
    snake-shaped pieces for
    your child to use.
  • Help your child form the pieces into the shapes
    of letters.
  • If you cookie dough, make sure the letters with
    enclosed circles (i.e., o, b, d, q) have plenty
    of space inside the circle before baking. This
    will assure that the circles will not close up
    when baked.

53
Vocabulary
  • What is it?
  • to know the meanings of words read
  • to know the meanings of words heard
  • to use a variety of words in spoken and written
    language

54
So
What does the research tell us we need to do
about language development vocabulary?
55
Research Evidence
  • Children enter school with a listening vocabulary
    ranging between 2500 to 5000
  • Vocabulary differences at grade 2 may last
    throughout elementary school (Biemiller Slonin,
    2001)
  • Children who enter with limited vocabulary
    knowledge grow more discrepant over time from
    their peers who have rich vocabulary knowledge
    ( Baker, Simmons Kameenui 1997)
  • 86-98 of the words recorded in each childs
    vocabulary consisted of words also recorded in
    their parents vocabularies ( Hart Risley,
    2000)

56
Vocabulary Gap
Average child from a welfare family hears about
3 million words a year vs. 11 million from a
professional family (Hart Risley, 1995)
57
Use High-Quality Oral Language
  • Model good language use
  • Engage in daily oral language
  • Read aloud good literature
  • Use less business talk
  • Use descriptive words
  • Lots of shared reading and conversations about
    words

58
Less Business TalkMore Conversations!
  • Business Talk
  • Come here!
  • Stop that!
  • Be quiet!
  • Sit down and eat!
  • Go watch TV!
  • Clean your room!
  • Go to sleep!
  • Get in the tub!
  • Conversations
  • Tell me about
  • How was .?
  • What do you think about?
  • Why is ..?
  • Do you think ..?
  • Who is ..?
  • What do you like?

59
Other Ways to Help Your Childs Language
Development
60
So
What does the research tell us we need to do
about language development vocabulary in
preschool students?
61
Read
Aloud
to
Children!
62
Curious George Gets a Medal
Curious shed professor Fountain pen
loop signal Funnel hurled
space suit Blotter grunting
parachute
63
Things You Can Do To Create a Reading Environment
  • Fill you classroom with books
  • Read Aloud to Your Children OFTEN!!!
  • Read Alouds are one of the BEST WAYS to teach
    vocabulary!

64
What do Kindergarteners have to learn?
  • Are we sending them ready for Kindergarten??

65
DIBELSDynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy
Skills
  • Quick one minute assessments that let us know if
    our students are on track to be readers. Help
    schools provide enough instruction to get
    students back on track as readers.
  • Helps schools see where they need to focus to
    help our children learn to read at each grade
  • Helps us see where we as parents can help at home
    to help our children learn to read

66
What Big Ideas are Being Assessed?
Initial Sounds Fluency (ISF) Phonemic
Segmentation Fluency (PSF)
Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF)
Oral Reading Fluency (ORF)
Word Use Fluency (WUF)
Oral Reading Fluency Retell Fluency (RTF)
Edward J. Kameenui, Ph. D. et al
67
What is Letter Naming Fluency (LNF)?
  • It is a one minute assessment
  • It is an indicator of risk of reading problems
  • It is not one of the 5 areas identified by the
    National Reading Panel and Reading First as one
    of the critical areas of reading
  • It is tested in fall, winter, spring of K also
    fall of first grade
  • Students should be able to name 25 random letter
    names in one minute by the end of K

68
Letter Naming Fluency
  • Target goal of at least 40 by spring of
    Kindergarten
  • Student identifies upper- and lower-case letters
    for 1 minute

69
What is Initial Sound Fluency (ISF)?
  • One minute assessment given at beginning and
    middle of K
  • Outcome goal of identifying 25 first sounds in
    words in one minute by middle of K.
  • Example Shown four pictures and told the picture
    names, the student can point to the one that
    begins with the correct sound given. Point to
    the one that begins with mmmm

70
Example
  • This is mouse, flowers, pillow, letters (point to
    each picture while saying its name).
  • Mouse begins with the sound /m/ (point to the
    mouse).
  • Listen /m/, mouse. Which one begins with the
    sounds /fl/?

71
What is Phoneme Segmentation Fluency (PSF)?
  • One minute assessment given middle of K, end of K
    and in beginning, middle, and end of first grade
  • Outcome goal is to be able to separate words into
    individual sounds by the end of K and to be able
    to do at the rate of 35 sounds per minute
  • Reaching outcome goal critical skill for becoming
    a good reader and speller
  • Continue to test through first grade, goal
    doesnt go up

72
Example
  • Say these specific directions to the student
  • I am going to say a word. After I say the word,
    you tell me all the sounds in the word. So, if I
    say, sam, you would say /s//a/ /m/.
  • Lets try one (one-second pause). Tell me the
    sounds in mop. If the student says /m/ /o/ /p/,
    you say, very good. The sounds in mop are /m/
    /o/ /p/.

73
Administration Directions
  • Look at this word (point to the first word on the
    practice probe). Its a make-believe word. Watch
    me read the word /s/ /i/ /m/ sim (point to
    each letter then run your finger fast beneath the
    whole word). I can say the sounds of the
    letters, /s/ /i/ /m/ (point to each letter), or I
    can read the whole word sim (run your finger
    fast beneath the whole word).

Practice Items
sim lut
  • Your turn to read a make-believe word. Read this
    word the best you can (point to the word lut).
    Make sure you say any sounds you know.

74
What is Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF)?
  • One minute assessment of alphabetic principle
    (phonics)
  • Students identify non words either by sounding
    out the non words or reading the whole word
    phonetically example
  • students can read the word sim either s-i-m or
    sim
  • Students are tested starting midyear K, year end
    K, beginning first, and the outcome goal is 50
    letter sounds by midyear first grade
  • NWF is tested at year end first and beginning
    second because it is such a critical reading
    skill
  • Students who have not acquired NWF regardless of
    grade or age have significant problems with
    decoding unknown words and becoming fluent
    readers

75
What is Oral Reading Fluency (ORF)?
  • ORF is the ability to accurately, rapidly, and
    fluently decode grade level text and to keep in
    memory what you have read so that you can retell
    it
  • It is tested starting midyear and year end first
    grade and tested three times a year in second and
    third grade
  • The goals change and increase as students get
    older and progress in their reading
  • More is always better, but students have to
    listen and think about their reading (you have to
    read with your ears on)

76
What to expect
  • Kindergarten
  • 25 crpm ISF by mid-year
  • 35 crpm PSF by end of year
  • 25 crpm LNF by end of year
  • 50 crpm NWF by end of year

77
What to expect
  • 1st grade
  • 35 crpm PSF start of year
  • 50 crpm NWF by mid-year
  • 40-60 wpm ORF by end-of-year

78
What to expect
  • 2nd grade
  • 90 wpm ORF by end of year
  • 3rd grade
  • 110 wpm ORF by end of year
  • 4th grade
  • 118 wpm by end of year
  • 5th grade
  • 125 wpm by end of year
  • 6th grade and after
  • 135 wpm by end of year

79
In Summary
80
Lets nail down these readiness skills!!
81
Resources
82
Picture Books to Read Aloud to an Infant or
Toddler
83
Books for a First-Grade Student Beginning
Reader-First Stage
84
Books for a First-Grade Student Beginning
Reader-Second Stage
85
Straight Talk About Reading
Susan L. Hall Ed.D Louisa C. Moats, Ed.D
86
  • P a r e n t i n g

a S t r u g g l i n g
R e a d e r
Susan L. Hall, Ed.D Louisa C. Moats, Ed.D
87
Road
to
the
Benita A. Blachman, Ph.D Eileen Wynne Ball,
Ph.D Rochella Black, M.S. Darlene M. Tangel, Ph.
D.
Code
88
P H O N E M I C
A W A R E N E S S
in Young Children
Marilyn Jager Adams Barbara R. Foorman Ingvar
Lundberg Terri Beeler
89
Bringing Words
To
Life
Isabel L. Beck Margaret G. McKeown Linda Kucan
90
Overcoming DYSLEXIA
Sally Shaywitz, M.D.
July 28, 2003
91
Other Books
  • Beginning to Read Thinking and Learning about
    Print- A Summary by Marilyn Jager Adams
  • Help Me Help My Child A Sourcebook for Parents
    of Learning Disabled Children by Jill Bloom
  • Your Childs Growing Mind A Practical Guide to
    Brain Development and Learning from Birth to
    Adolescence by Jane M. Healy, PhD.
  • About Dyslexia Unraveling the Myth by Priscilla
    L. Vail
  • The Educated Child by Bennett, Finn, Cribb

92
EAROBICS
93
Websites
  • www.proactiveparent.com
  • http//www.ldonline.org
  • http//www.interdys.org
  • http//ggg.umn.edu/
  • http//www.seacparentassistancecenter.com/
  • www.kpirc.org
  • www.colorincolorado.com
  • http//www.readingrockets.org

94
What We Know Now About Helping All Children Learn
to Read
  • There are five big ideas in learning to read
  • Phonemic Awareness
  • Phonics
  • Vocabulary
  • Fluency
  • Comprehension
  • These are critical foundational expectations of
    early preschool programs!!

95
Ensure Early Literacy Competency Mastery!
96
Contact Information
  • Julie Colley Lowery, Education Specialist
  • Alabama Department of Education
  • jlowery_at_alsde.edu
  • Cathy Jones, Education Specialist
  • Alabama Department of Education
  • cjones_at_alsde.edu
  • Teresa Nichols, Education Consultant
  • Nichols Education Services, Inc.
  • tnichols_at_nicholseducationservices.com
  • Teresa.Nichols_at_hotmail.com
  • www.nicholseducationservices.com
About PowerShow.com