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Chemistry Subject POSt Information

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Title: Chemistry Subject POSt Information


1
Chemistry Subject POSt Information
The following pages provide supplemental
information about the programs of studies in
chemistry
2
Programs of Studies in Chemistry
  • Specialist Programs
  • Chemistry Specialist
  • Biological Chemistry Specialist
  • Chemical Physics Specialist
  • Environmental Chemistry Specialist
  • Materials Chemistry Specialist
  • Synthetic and Catalytic Chemistry Specialist
  • Major/Minor Programs
  • Chemistry Major
  • Chemistry Minor
  • Environmental Chemistry Minor
  • Nanoscience Minor

3
Chemistry Specialist

4
Chemistry Specialist
Broad coverage in core areas of chemistry plus
introductory courses in mathematics and physics.
Flexible requirements in 3rd and 4th Year
course requirements allows students to tailor
their course choices. Suitable for professional
work in any area of chemistry and for entry into
graduate school.
5
Chemistry Specialist
Covers research areas not covered by other
specialty programs
Organic and Inorganic Synthesis
Organometallic Chemistry Catalysis Medicinal
Pharmaceutical Chemistry Analytical
Chemistry Molecular Devices
6
Chemistry Specialist Requirements
Consult Associate Chair, Undergraduate
Studies This specialist program requires
completion of 14 Full Courses, including the
following courses
First Year
CHM151Y (strongly recommended) or
CHM138H/139H MAT135Yor MAT137Y PHY(131H, 132H) or
PHY(151H, 152H)
7
Chemistry Specialist Requirements
Second Year
Analytical - CHM217H Physical - CHM225Y or
(CHM220H min grade B and CHM221H) Inorganic -
CHM238Y Organic - CHM249H (strongly recommended)
or CHM247H Calculus II - MAT235Y or
MAT237Y Biochemistry BCH210H
Physical - CHM326H or CHM328H Experimental
Physical - CHM327H Further 300/400-level course
equivalents in CHM/MAT/another science,
including at least three of Analytical -
CHM317H Inorganic - CHM338H Organic - CHM343H
Biomolecular - CHM379H Analytical
Environmental CHM410H Introduction to Research
CHM499Y, and at least three 400-level CHM full
course equivalents
3rd / 4th Year
8
Specialist in Biological Chemistry
What is it? The study of the chemistry of
biological systems. Nature at the atomic and
molecular level.
Biochemistry
Biological Chemistry
Cell
Pathway
Biomolecule
Atoms
CO2 H20 ltgt HCO3- H
For example Biological catalysis, biosynthesis,
protein switching, receptors, carbohydrate
chemistry, genetic regulation, bioinorganic
chemistry, chemical genetics, signaling, transport
9
Specialist in Biological Chemistry
Why? Understand how nature works at the molecular
level. Manipulate biomolecules to design new
systems.
How? Cellular biology, molecular
biology,genetics, protein chemistry,
spectroscopy, analytical chemistry, structural
biology, biochemistry, organic synthesis,
biophysics
  • What next?
  • Graduate school - chemistry, biochemistry,
    biophysics, pharmacy
  • Professional schools medicine, law, dentistry,
    pharmacy, business
  • Biotech Industry
  • Pharmaceutical Industry
  • Academics - Universities, primary and secondary
    education
  • Government labs, public policy
  • Science journalism
  • Consulting

10
Specialist in Biological Chemistry
1st Year BIO(120H, 130H), CHM151Y/(138H/139H),
MAT135Y/137Y, PHY(131H,132H)/(151H,152H)
2nd Year BIO250Y/(240H, 241H) Cellular and
Molecular Biology CHM225Y/(220H,
221H) Introduction to Physical Chemistry CHM238Y
Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry CHM249H
Organic Chemistry BCH210H Introductory
Biochemistry CHM217H Introduction to Analytical
Chemistry Plus half credit MAT/CSC/STA
course 3rd Year CHM347H Organic Chemistry
of Biological Compounds CHM348H Organic
Reaction Mechanisms CHM379H Techniques in
Biological Chemistry 4th Year CHM437H
Bio-Inorganic Chemistry CHM447H
Bio-Organic CHM479H Biological Chemistry
11
Specialist in Biological Chemistry
And maybe
medicinal/pharmaceutical chemistry
CHM325H Materials Chemistry CHM342H Modern
Organic Synthesis CHM343H Organic Synthesis
Laboratory CHM338H Intermediate Inorganic
Chemistry PHC320H Medicinal Chemistry
CHM440H Synthesis of Modern Pharmaceutical
Agents CHM441H Applications of Spectroscopy to
Organic Structure Determination CHM443H
Physical Organic Chemistry CHM499Y Introduction
to Research in Chemistry
Or.
bioanalytical chemistry
CHM310H Environmental Chemistry CHM317H
Introduction to Instrumental Methods of
Analysis BCH304H Cell Dynamics Interactions
CHM417H Laboratory Instrumentation CHM443H
Physical Organic Chemistry CHM499Y Introduction
to Research in Chemistry BCH425H Structural
Biology Principles Practice CSB450H Plant
Proteomics Metabolomics
12
Specialist in Biological Chemistry
Ron Kluger - Enzyme-coenzyme catalysis
mechanisms - Protein modification,
hemoglobin Andrew Woolley - Photo-control of
peptide and protein conformations - Fluorescent
studies on membrane channel formation Jumi
Shin - Directed evolution and design of
DNA-binding proteins Deborah Zamble -
Bioinorganic chemistry
- Metalloenzyme biosynthesis, metal
homeostasis Mark Nitz - Fluorescent methods to
study sulfated carbohydrates - Chemoenzymatic
synthesis
13
Chemical Physics Specialist
What is chemical physics?
  • Chemical Physics can be characterized as the
    quest to lay bare the underlying basic
    explanations of the structure and dynamics of
    molecular and bulk-matter systems, in terms of
    the interactions of atoms and molecules. The
    subject matter covers vast territory, including
  • Explaining the behavior of polymers, fluids and
    solids, self-assembly of complex systems.
  • Dynamics of simple and complex systems.
  • Study of biophysical systems enzyme catalysis,
    protein structure and dynamics, molecular motors,
    energy transduction, packing of DNA.
  • Properties of nanoscale systems.
  • Molecular collisions and scattering theory,
    coherent quantum processes, non-linear chemical
    dynamics, chemical processes at surfaces.
  • The quantum structure of molecules,
    photochemistry, heterogeneous kinetics and
    reaction dynamics.
  • Interactions of light and matter, control of
    chemical processes, new laser technologies

14
Why study chemical physics?
Because it is fun!
(No, really!)
15
Why study chemical physics?
Because it is fun!
(No, really!)
16
Why study chemical physics?
Because it is fun!
(No, really!)
Examples
Chemistry of molecular recognition in enzymes.
17
Why study chemical physics?
Because it is fun!
(No, really!)
Examples
Molecular dynamics of membranes (bilayers).
18
Why study chemical physics?
Because it is fun!
(No, really!)
Examples
Building new laser systems.
19
Why study chemical physics?
Possible career options
  • 1. Academia.
  • 2. Government research labs.
  • 3. Industrial research labs.
  • Photonics laser industry
  • Pure research
  • Drug design in pharmaceutical industry
  • 3. Scientific software developer.

20
  • Who is suited for the chemical physics program?
  • The Chemical Physics Program is appropriate for
    students whose interests lie in the
    interdisciplinary area between chemistry and
    physics. Students of the program typically
    pursue graduate degrees in chemical physics or
    certain areas of physics.
  • What comprises the program?
  • It includes key courses in physical chemistry
    and certain areas of physics (including
    electromagnetism and classical mechanics) and
    allows students to take additional courses in
    either physics or chemistry depending on their
    primary interest.

Consult Professor S. Whittington, Department
of Chemistry
21
Chemical Physics Program
  • Enrolment in this program requires completion of
    four courses no minimum GPA required.
  • Specialist Program 14 full courses or their
    equivalent, including at least 1.5 400-series
    courses.
  • First Year
  • Intro. Chem ( CHM 151Y or CHM 138H 139H )
  • Calculus (MAT 137Y/157Y)
  • Intro. Physics. (PHY 131H, 132H) or (PHY 151H,
    152H)

then
22
Chemical Physics Course Requirements
  • Higher Years
  • Introduction to Physical Chemistry (CHM 225)
  • Linear Algebra (MAT223 or 240)
  • Calculus II (MAT 235 or 237)
  • Intro. to Ordinary Differential Equations (MAT
    244)
  • Electricity and Magnetism (PHY 250)
  • Oscillations and Waves (PHY 2544)
  • Complex Variables (MAT 334)
  • Classical Mechanics (PHY 354)
  • Electromagnetic Theory (PHY 350)
  • Differential Equations (APM 346)
  • Application of Quantum Mechanics (CHM423)
  • Two full course equivalents from
  • Intro. Anal. Chem. (CHM 217H), Intro. Org. Chem.
    (CHM238),
  • Org. Chem. II (CHM 247/249), Environmental Chem.
    (CHM310), Instrumental Methods (CHM 317),
    Intermed. Inorg. Chem. (CHM 338), Org. Reaction
    Mech. (CHM 348), Atmospheric Chem. (CHM415).
  • Further 400-series half-courses in CHM/PHY to
    make a total of 14 full courses

23
Environmental Chemistry What is it? Study of
chemical changes in the environment arising from
humankinds activities Issues? Air pollution,
climate change, organic pollutants, soil
contamination, water quality How? Analysis
of contaminant levels (analytical) Kinetics
and mechanism studies (physical, organic) With
whom? Toxicologists, atmospheric scientists,
oceanographers, geologists, ecologists,
statisticians, epidemiologists, Where? In
the lab Everywhere else e.g. the Arctic, Lake
Ontario, Environment Canada field stations,
Afterwards? Academics, government labs,
environmental consulting, emerging
technologies for energy, public advocacy, public
policy, education
24
  • Environmental Chemistry at UofT
  • Focus on the development of a strong chemistry
    background
  • Take specialist degrees in either Chemistry or
    Environmental Chemistry
  • Second year courses
  • CHM217H Analytical Chemistry
  • CHM225Y/(220H, 221H) Physical Chemistry
  • CHM238Y Inorganic Chemistry
  • CHM249H Organic Chemistry
  • ENV235Y Physics and Chemistry of the Earth
  • In later years
  • CHM310H Environmental Chemistry
  • CHM410H Analytical Environmental Chemistry
  • CHM415H Atmospheric Chemistry
  • plus a number of other CHM and ENV courses
  • - Get involved in research at St. George Jon
    Abbatt (studies of atmospheric particulates),
    Jamie Donaldson (atmospheric physical chemistry),
    Scott Mabury (fate of organic pollutants),
    Jennifer Murphy (field studies of air pollutants)

25
Materials Science
A Collaborative Program between the Faculty of
Arts Science and the Faculty of Applied
Science Engineering
  • Materials science is the study of the structure,
    properties, and applications of
  • all types of materials including metals,
    ceramics, glasses and polymers.
  • Examples of materials with advanced properties
  • amorphous metals
  • liquid crystals
  • semiconductors
  • nanostructured materials
  • photonic crystals
  • high critical temperature superconductors
  • biomaterials
  • high strength polymers
  • composite materials
  • polymers for tissue engineering
  • materials for drug delivery

26
Materials ScienceInterdisciplinary Program
  • Materials science is an interdisciplinary program
    drawing on the basic sciences of chemistry,
    physics, polymers, metallurgy and ceramics.
  • The tools of investigation of material structure
    include
  • electron microscopy
  • x-ray diffraction
  • Auger emission spectroscopy
  • x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy
  • FT-IR spectroscopy
  • Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopy
  • Confocal Fluorescent Microscopy

27
Materials Science Program Course requirements
Coordinators Professor Eugenia Kumacheva,
Department of Chemistry Lash Miller Building,
Room 627 Professor Glenn Hibbard, Department of
Metallurgy and Materials Science Wallberg
Building, Room 140 Enrolment in this program
requires completion of four courses no minimum
GPA required.
28
Materials ScienceCourse requirements
Specialist program 14 full courses or their
equivalent, including at least one 400-series
course Students follow one of two streams
Materials Chemistry or Materials Science and
Engineering
First Year BIO(120H, 130H), CHM 151Y/(138H,
139H) MAT 135Y/137Y PHY (131H, 132H)/(151H,
152H) Second Year MSE 101H CHM 225Y/(220H,
221H), 238Y, 247H/249H MSE219H, 235H Third and
Fourth Years 1. CHM 325H, 327H, 338H,
343H/348H, 426H, 434H 2. At least two of the
following MSE 316H, 318H, (342H, 343H),
351H 3. At least two of the following MSE 430H,
440H, 459H, 461H, 550H
Materials Chemistry StreamCHM 499Y
Introduction to Chemistry Research Materials
Science and Engineering StreamMSE 498Y Design
Research project
29
Synthetic and Catalytic Chemistry Specialist
Program
Broad coverage in core areas of chemistry in 1st
and 2nd Years plus introductory courses in
mathematics, physics and biochemistry. 3rd and
4th Year course requirements focussed on the
areas of synthesis and catalysis in organic and
inorganic chemistry. Suitable for professional
work in chemistry and for entry into graduate
school.
30
Synthetic and Catalytic Chemistry Specialist
Program
  • Catalysis is revolutionizing the science,
    technology and art of chemical synthesis.
  • Modern synthetic methods allow for the formation
    of many classes of molecules, in a manner that
    quite simply would not have been possible twenty,
    or even ten, years ago. For example, newly
    approved pharmaceuticals are not only being
    increasingly synthesized in bulk using catalytic
    reactions, but their discovery is often
    facilitated using catalysis at the earliest
    stages of the research and development programs.
  • Moreover, there is an increasing need for the
    development of new methods and catalysts that can
    be applied toward more efficient, cheaper and
    environmentally friendly syntheses than are
    possible with existing technologies.
  • These advances represent a mere fraction of the
    possibilities for innovation and discovery in
    this field that will surely emerge in the future.

31
Synthetic and Catalytic ChemistrySpecialist
Program
In the first and second years the program
requirements are the same as for the chemistry
specialist program. This specialist program
requires completion of 14.0 Full Course
Equivalents, including the following required
courses.
First Year
CHM151Y (strongly recommended) or CHM138H
139H MAT135Yor MAT137Y PHY (131H1, 132H1) or
(151H1, 152H1)
Second Year
Inorganic - CHM238Y Organic - CHM249H (strongly
recommended) or CHM247H Analytical -
CHM217H Physical - CHM225Y or (CHM220H min grade
B CHM221H) Calculus II - MAT235Y or
MAT237Y Biochemistry - BCH210H
32
Synthetic and Catalytic ChemistrySpecialist
Program
3rd Year
CHM 317H Introduction to Instrumental
Analysis CHM 338H Intermediate Inorganic
Chemistry CHM 342H Modern Organic Synthesis CHM
343H Organic Synthesis Techniques CHM 347H
Organic Chemistry of Biological Compounds CHM
348H Organic Reaction Mechanisms
4th Year
CHM 432H Organometallic Chemistry CHM 440H
Synthesis of Modern Pharmaceutical Agents CHM
441H Spectroscopic Analysis in Organic
Chemistry CHM 443H Physical Organic Chemistry
Research Experience CHM 398H Independent
Experiential Project or CHM 499Y Introduction to
Chemistry Research
33
Synthetic and Catalytic ChemistrySpecialist
Program
PLUS a further 0.5 or 1.0 Credits from the
following 3rd 4th Year Chemistry Courses to
make a total of 14.0 Credits CHM 325H
Introduction to Inorganic and Polymer Materials
Chemistry CHM 328H Modern Physical Chemistry CHM
379H Biomolecular Chemistry CHM 416H Separation
Science CHM421H Chemical Kinetics and
Dynamics CHM 434H Advanced Materials Chemistry
CHM 437H Bio-inorganic Chemistry CHM 447H
Bio-organic Chemistry CHM 479H Biological
Chemistry
Consult Professor Rob Batey, Dept. of Chemistry
34
Synthetic and Catalytic ChemistrySpecialist
Program
Career opportunities
This program is quite distinct from the other
Chemistry Specialist programs. The required
courses provide students with a laboratory
intensive learning experience, and include a
requirement for upper level independent research.
Such synthetically trained students are in high
demand in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, crop
protection, materials and related discovery
intensive sectors. For example, the training
obtained in the area of synthesis and catalysis
is considered to be the ideal preparation for
entry into medicinal and process chemistry
departments in pharma/biotech companies.
35
Major / Minor Programs
  • The major and minor programs in Chemistry are
    intended for those students who wish to take some
    chemistry courses, but who do not wish to follow
    one of the specialist programs.
  • The major program requires completion of 8 full
    courses or their equivalent, while the minor
    requires only 4 full courses.
  • For more information, contact the Undergraduate
    Office, Lash Miller Rm 151.

36
Chemistry MajorCourse requirements
Eight full courses or their equivalent, including
at least one CHM half-course equivalent at the
400 level.
  • First Year CHM 151Y/(138H, 139H MAT 135Y/137Y
  • Second Year At least two of CHM 217H, 220H/225Y,
    238Y, 247H/249H (CHM249H strongly recommended)
  • Third Year At least two of CHM 317H, 327H,
    338H, 343H, 348H), 379H
  • Fourth Year Further 200/300/400-level CHM
    courses to make a total of seven CHM full course
    equivalents (CHM 299Y excluded)

37
Chemistry Minor
Four full courses or their equivalent, including
at least one CHM full-course equivalent at the
300 level.
  • First Year CHM 151Y/(138H, 139H)
  • Second Year At least one of CHM 217H,
    220H/225Y, 238Y, 247H/249H (CHM249H strongly
    recommended)
  • Third Year At least one of CHM 317H, 327H,
    338H, 343H, 348H, 379H
  • Fourth Year Further 200/300/400-level CHM
    courses to make a total of four CHM full course
    equivalents (CHM 299Y excluded)

38
Environmental Chemistry Minor
Four full courses or their equivalent, including
at least one full-course equivalent at the 300
level.
  • CHM 151Y/(138H, 139H)
  • One full course equivalent from CHM 217H, (220H,
    221H)/225Y, 238Y, 247H/249H
  • ENV 235Y
  • Any two of CHM310H, 317H, 410H, 415H

39
Nanoscience Minor
  • This physical science-based minor program
    represents a unique opportunity to study
    chemistry and physics in a different cultural
    environment. Students take core subjects at the
    first-year level in Toronto and spend the spring
    semester of their second or third year at the
    National University of Singapore, where they are
    enrolled in lecture courses and undertake a
    faculty-supervised research project.
  • Four full courses or their equivalent, including
    at least one full-course equivalent at the 300
    level.
  • CHM 151Y/139H, PHY (131H,132H)/(151H,152H)
  • NUS 227H, 228H, 328H, 398H
  • Further CHM courses to make a total of four CHM
    full course equivalents
  • NUS courses must be taken at the National
    University of Singapore during either the spring
    semester of second year studies or the spring
    semester of third year studies.
  • Consult Dr. Andy Dicks, Dept. of Chemistry

40
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41
Career Opportunities
B.Sc. in Chemistry leads to numerous career paths
42
Undergraduate Office
  • At some time in your undergraduate career you
    will certainly need some advice from someone who
    is knowledgeable about your major field of
    interest. The staff at the Department will be
    pleased to discuss your program with you and to
    give advice on course selection.

If you have questions, come to or contact the
Undergraduate Office Lash Miller Building, Room
151 416-978-6033 undergrd_at_chem.utoronto.ca
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