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Latino Culture Awareness, Sensitivity & How to Serve this Population

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Title: Latino Culture Awareness, Sensitivity & How to Serve this Population


1
Latino Culture Awareness, Sensitivity How to
Serve this Population
2
  • TOPICS
  • Who is considered undocumented?
  • Lets focus on Latinos definitions of who is
    who, general information, poverty data, and more.
  • Why she/he might be undocumented/reasons?
  • Who are they and where are they from?
  • Latino General Information Misconceptions
  • Overview of Immigrant Women Power Control Wheel
    and the Immigrant Refugee Power Control Wheel
  • Factors of why the victim chooses to stay or
    live with Family
  • Violence

3
  • Cont
  • 8. What to expect with any foreign victim,
    even documented
  • 9. What are the undocumented victim challenges
    and
  • barriers, as well as mine as a Service
    Provider? And, how can I be more sensitive to
    them?
  • 10. Which are the services undocumented
    immigrants are eligible for and which ones are
    not?
  • 11. Information about Protection Visas, Special
    Immigrant Juvenile Visas Immigration in General
  • 12. Resources

4
  • 1. Who is considered undocumented?
  • In order to correctly identify who is
    undocumented and who is
  • not, it is important to know the meaning of the
    following words
  • Undocumented
  • Alien
  • Undocumented immigrant
  • Immigrant
  • Non-immigrant
  • Migrant
  • Lawful Permanent Resident
  • Citizen
  • Refugee

5
2. Lets Focus on Latinos --definitions of who is
who, misconceptions and assumptions,
general information and more
  • Hispanic
  • Latino
  • Mexican
  • Mexican-American
  • Chicano
  • Latin-American
  • Spanish Person

6
3. Why she/he might be Undocumented - Reasons
? Cost of the Visa ? Eligibility
Requirements ? The marriage or sponsorship
ended and therefore, the paperwork had
to be cancelled or was never filled out. ?
The immigrant came legally with a tourist visa,
student visa, work permit or such and
decided to prolong his/her stay (after the
expiration of the permit) without notifying the
Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)
agency or without renewing of such permit. ?
The cost of sponsoring a foreign worker or
relative is expensive and long
7
Cont ? Processing Time ? Government
services to assist the needy is non-existent ?
The real reasons for hiring, marrying
or bringing someone to the US was for illegal
or deceitful reasons (abduction,
servitude, prostitution) so the person
might have arrived legally by using
someone else's real paperwork or even
without any documentation
8
4. Who are these individuals and where are they
from? They are undocumented individuals from
many different nationalities. It is wrongly
believed that most undocumented persons are
Mexican or that they come only from Mexico.
However, the migration that Arkansas and other
states are experiencing comes within the US
itself these are individuals moving from bigger
into smaller states such as California, Texas,
New Mexico, Iowa, etc) Other undocumented
individuals are from Europe (i.e. Spain, Russia,
Italy, etc.) Africa (i.e. Kenya, Middle East,
etc.) Asia (Japan, China, Korea, India, etc.)
and America (Chile, Argentina, Peru, Honduras, El
Salvador, Mexico and more.) Did you know that
there are lots of undocumented Latin-American
individuals living in the US posing as Mexicans
when there are not?
9
5. Latino General Information and Misconceptions
Family Traditions Education
Employment Religion Poverty Fear of authority and
immigration status Government, Social and Human
Services DV and Latino women
Employment Facts
? Although Latinos have the reputation of
accepting work others will not
take with an unemployment rate of 14.7
in 2009, still Latinos were about 56 more
likely to be unemployed than whites (Bureau of
Labor).
10
  • ? Casual day labor is some of the most
    difficult, badly-compensated work in
    the United States, and is done overwhelmingly by
    Latinos. (Of the estimated 118,000 day
    laborers in the country working on a given day,
    59 are Mexican and 28 are of Central and
    South American origin.
  • ? Day laborers can earn about 15,000 if they
    work all year, and without benefits.
  • ? Because of their low incomes, Latinos are
    most likely to use welfare. In 2004, 50
    of Latino households used at least one form of
    welfare, compared to 47 of blacks and 18
    of whites. However, according the report of
    The Urban Institute in Washington D.C. in 2007,
    Immigrants and their children have a small
    but positive net fiscal effect on the state
    budget. Some 237 million in 2004 went to
    immigrant-related education, health
    services, and corrections. Those costs were
    offset by direct and indirect tax payments
    of 257 million, resulting in a net surplus to
    the state budget.
  • ? Latinos' low graduation rates reflect the
    language and cultural barriers faced by
    immigrants. However, US-born Latinos do better
    than the foreign-born .

11
Misconceptions, Assumption and False Beliefs
  • ? Every Spanish-speaking person is Mexican
  • ? Every Spanish-speaking person is here
    illegally/undocumented
  • ? Every Spanish-speaking person is uneducated
  • ? Mexican is a language
  • ? Hispanic is a race
  • ? Every Hispanic is Latino or every Latino is
    Hispanic, and every Hispanic
  • is Mexican, or every Latino is Mexican
  • ? Spanish-speaking people are all involved in
    gangs or illegal activity
  • ? Every Spanish-speaking person is lazy
  • Mexico is in South-America and its just a
    piece of land not divided into
  • states
  • The Mexican Consulate can assist all Spanish
    speaking persons
  • ? Latino women like to be abused

12
6. Overview of Immigrant Women Power Control
Wheel and the Immigrant Refugee Power
Control Wheel Undocumented victims of violence
of any form, especially Domestic Violence
experience the same Power and Control as
African-Americans and Caucasians do, as
illustrated in the Power Control Wheel.
  • Emotional Abuse
  • Economic Abuse
  • Sexual Abuse
  • Using Children
  • Threats
  • Male Privilege
  • Intimidation
  • Isolation

13
Immigrant Women Power Control Wheel
  • Emotional Abuse
  • Economic Abuse
  • Sexual Abuse
  • Using Children
  • Threats
  • Citizenship or
  • Residency Privilege
  • Intimidation
  • Isolation

NOTE See handout of Immigrant Power Control
Wheel
14
Immigrant Refugee Power Control Wheel
  • Minimizing,
  • Denying and Blaming
  • Use of Male Privilege
  • Isolation
  • Economic Abuse
  • Emotional Abuse
  • Coercion and Threats
  • Using Children
  • Intimidation

NOTE See handout of Immigrant and Refugee Power
Control Wheel
15
  • Something to think about
  • In addition to these threats, immigrant and
    refugee battered women in the U.S. have many
    difficulties accessing legal and social services
    in a country which is not their own.
  • They face cultural differences and barriers which
    abusers may use to their advantage.
  • Immigrant and refugee battered women are an
    underrepresented population because many of the
    incidents are not reported.
  • The women believe they have no rights, no way
    out, and no help.
  • All over the world violence against women is the
    most basic example of gender discrimination and
    oppression. It is the most powerful tool of male
    domination and control, especially among
    immigrant women.

16
7. Factors of why the victim Chooses to stay
Despite the abuse experienced by both the
abuser and the system, this situation is less in
the victim's perspective than the situation at
home in his/her native countries. Therefore,
there are many reasons of why the victim has no
other choice than to remain in the U.S. and to
continue the situation she/he is in
? Her/His children might be US citizens, so
escaping or going back to her country is
no longer an option. ? Her/His
immigration status is depending upon
current sponsorship and/or spouse ? Her/His
family abroad is depending on the money
being sent ? The hope of becoming a legal
resident/citizen, and the future
possibility of bringing the rest of the
family to the U.S.
17
Cont ? The family would disown her for
reporting the abuse to police and for not
protecting the relationship or for not keeping
the marriage together ? The spouse is the main
breadwinner while she cares for the children at
home ? It is "easier" to get by in this
country than his/her own ? The basic needs, at
least for her children, are being met ? He/she
has found new support ? The low possibility of
being able to come back if
deported ? Risking the possibility of having
a criminal record ? The penalty for
deportation or jail time is too long ?
Most of his/her family is already here
18
8. What to expect with any foreign victim, even
documented Because of the language
barrier and the lack of knowledge of US laws,
civil rights, and available services to
them, you can expect to assist them in many
areas, even some might go beyond your
field. Some of them are ? Assisting
with Social Services applications (Food Stamps,
TEA, SSI, Medicaid, etc.) ? Assisting with
Juvenile court (hearings, adjudications, etc.)
?   Services and Family Intervention ?
  Foster Parents, Visitations, Probation officer
meetings, etc. ?   Immigration assistance and
other relevant paperwork and more
NOTE It is important to develop a chart or needs
report, especially when dealing with children in
foster care, neglect cases, and other relevant
issues and or needs, especially when the case
involves immigration issues.
19
  • 9. What are the undocumented victim challenges
    and
  • barriers as well as mine as advocate? And,
    how can I be
  • sensitive to them?
  • Be prepared to face the following
  • ? Language barrier
  • ? Fear (of any kind of authority, even you)
  • ? Large family needs
  • ? Immigration status
  • ? Economical situation/Poverty
  • ? Housing conditions needs
  • ? Lack of knowledge of the law
  • ? Lack of basic information about services
  • ? Lack of understanding of U.S. laws (all)
  • ? Lack of education
  • ? Lack of transportation

20
Culture Sensitivity ? Do not make
assumptions, ask direct questions ? Leave
your personal beliefs and opinions behind ?
Do a personal and family needs assessment (food
stamps, WIC, Legal Aid, shelter, GED,
schooling for kids, etc.) ? Do a general
Safety Plan (in native language, if possible) ?
Explain in detail the paper work, how it works
and what it does for the victim (i.e. Order of
Protection, Police Reports, etc.) ? Only if
necessary, ask about immigration status ? Get
to know your client and his/her immediate
family ? Ask about number of children
involved and their ages, as well if they are U.S.
citizens. They could qualify for additional
services despite the immigration status of the
parents.
21
Cont ? If you dont speak their
language, offer a professional interpreter ?
Make liaisons with other service providers ?
Accept/welcome their gestures of gratitude (such
as hugs, or touching, food, etc. except
money!) ? Accept their cultural
differences ? Try your best to gain trust
? Ask about relationship with partner
(marriage, live together, boyfriend, fiancé) ?
Her/his children are in DHS custody and have to
wait to get them back and perhaps then leave
NEVER use the kids as interpreters, they will be
re-victimized
22
  • 10. Which are the services they are eligible, and
    which ones
  • are not are not?
  • Undocumented individuals with children born in
    the U.S. (US citizens)
  • are eligible to ALL the services, just like any
    other US citizen, such as
  • 1. Health Insurance provided by the US
    government (ARKids)
  • 2. The right to obtain a real Social
    Security card
  • 3. Daycare
  • 4. WIC
  • 5. Food Stamps
  • 6. SSI, TEA and other services provided by
    DHS
  • 7. Education

23
  • 11. Information about Protection Visas and
    Immigration
  • The basic and most common questions are
  • 1. How do I know which one?
  • 2. How long does it take to obtain one?
  • 3. What is the process?
  • 4. What are the requirements?
  • 5. Does my victim qualify? etc.
  • Passed by Congress on October 11, 2000, the
    Victims of Trafficking and
  • Violence Protection Act of 2000 includes the
    Violence Against Women Act
  • of 2000 (VAWA), which expands and improves the
    protections for battered
  • spouses and their children. Under the VAWA Act,
    3 types of protection visas
  • can be petitioned
  • The U-Visa
  • The VAWA Visa
  • The T-Visa

24
U-Visa available to immigrants who are either
victims of or have information concerning one of
the following forms of criminal activity rape
torture, trafficking, incest, domestic violence,
sexual assault, abusive sexual contact,
prostitution, sexual exploitation, female genital
mutilation, hostage holding, peonage, involuntary
servitude, slave trade, kidnapping, abduction,
unlawful criminal restraint, false imprisonment,
blackmail, extortion, manslaughter, murder, or
solicitation to commit offenses. VAWA Visa
available to immigrants married to US citizens or
legal residents and who also are either victims
of or have information concerning one of the
following forms of criminal activity rape
torture, trafficking, incest, domestic violence,
sexual assault, abusive sexual contact,
prostitution, sexual exploitation, female genital
mutilation, hostage holding, peonage, involuntary
servitude, slave trade, kidnapping, abduction,
unlawful criminal restraint, false imprisonment,
blackmail, extortion, manslaughter, murder, or
solicitation to commit offenses. T-Visa
available to individuals who are victims of a
severe form of trafficking in persons. Severe
forms of trafficking include sex trafficking of
persons under 18 years of age, or recruiting or
obtaining persons of labor or services through
the use of force, fraud, or coercion for the
purpose of subjection to involuntary servitude,
peonage, debt bondage, or slavery.
25
  • Special Immigrant Juvenile Visa These are
    children under the age of 18 who have been
    abandoned, abused or neglected by their
    biological parent(s) or an adult caregiver. Some
    come to the United States unaccompanied by an
    adult or come with their parents and are later
    abused or abandoned by their parents or an adult
    caregiver. Usually, involvement by a state child
    welfare agency is required to determine the state
    of abuse, neglect or abandonment.
  • 1. The individual must be under 21 and
    unmarried.
  • 2. The person must have been declared a ward
    of a US court.
  • 3. That court must have placed the child in
    the custody of a state agency
  • or rule that the child is eligible for
    long-term foster care.
  • 4. It must have been determined, through
    administrative or judicial
  • proceedings, that it would not be in the
    child's best interests to be
  • returned to his or her home country.

26
It is important to mention that each Visa,
either VAWA, U,or T has its own requirements
1. Press charges with Prosecuting Attorneys
Office 2. Victims Collaboration 3. A
federal, state, or local law enforcement must
certify that such investigation or
prosecution is in progress or was
completed with the victims assistance. In the
case of minors, with the assistance of the
immigrant parents, father or mother. 4. Time
Sensitivity 5. Eligibility for petitioners
varies, for primary victim no age limit.
For secondary victims, must be under the age of
18. 6. Abused spouses and their children, or
abused children and their parents can
self-petition to obtain Legal Permanent
Residence (LPR) status without the cooperation of
the abusing relative.
27
7. VAWA also enabled battered spouses and
children to obtain suspension of
deportation or cancellation of removal if they
were present in the US for at least
3 years rather than 7 years. 8. VAWA also
allows individuals to self-petition even though
they have been divorced from the
citizen or LPR, provided that the
marriage terminated within the past two years and
a connection between the termination
of the marriage and the abuse of the
immigrant can be shown, or even if the relative
has died. 9. Other include letters of moral
character, copies of identification
(passports are the most acceptable if individual
has no US valid ID), copies of police
reports and order of protections, hospital
records, evidence of residence, etc.
28
12. Resources
  • Catholic Dioceses of Little Rock / Immigration
    Services
  • Nubia Torres, VAWA Immigration Specialist
  • Tel 664-0340
  • Catholic Dioceses of NWA / Immigration
    Services
  • Maria Miller, VAWA Immigration Specialist
  • Tel 479/927-1996
  • Pulaski County Court House
  • Will provide interpreters if requested in
    advance
  • UAMS, Childrens Hospital, St. Vincent Baptist
    Health
  • Will provide interpreters if requested in
    advance or in emergency situations
  • Childrens Hospital
  • Has In-house interpreters 24 hours a day, 7 days
    a week
  • Adult Education Center (to obtain GED)
  • Tel 1877-898-3180
  • They do offer classes and tests in Spanish
  • Mexican Consulate
  • Tel 372-6933 in LR
  • For Mexican nationals/citizens only

29
  • Testimony of an Immigrant
  • I have crossed many times, and what I would say
  • to those that will cross for
  • the first time would be
  • If you leave, dont forget your family
  • Your children await for you
  • Your parents love you
  • Your friends miss you
  • And your country, bleeds without you
  • -Plácido, a man leaving behind his land, his
    history, his soul

Damn misery! I gave birth to three sons, but
none of them are here It feels like if I never
had them. Now, I dont know if I will ever see
them again.
30
Q A
31
Safe Places Lisette Yang Latino Advocate
Coordinator Outreach Tel 519-2352 cell Tel
374-7233 office lyang_at_safeplacesLR.org
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