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RESPONSE TO INSTRUCTION AND INTERVENTION – RTI2 TIER ONE

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RESPONSE TO INSTRUCTION AND INTERVENTION RTI2 TIER ONE Shasta County Office of Education Sept. 22, 2010 * * * * * * * * * * * * Done by 9 am * * 1:45-2:30 * Done ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: RESPONSE TO INSTRUCTION AND INTERVENTION – RTI2 TIER ONE


1
RESPONSE TO INSTRUCTION AND INTERVENTION
RTI2TIER ONE
  • Shasta County Office of Education Sept. 22,
    2010

2
Agenda
  • Overview and Refresher from August Conference
  • Understanding Universal Screening and Initial
    Identification
  • Delivering Quality Teaching of Core Programs with
    Differentiated Instruction In-Class Monitoring
  • Using Standards, Benchmark Assessments, and Data
    for Reteaching and Identification of In-Class
    Interventions
  • Identifying Professional Development
    Considerations and Using PLCs Effectively for
    Tier 1
  • Providing time for teams to begin planning for
    site implementation

3
OVERVIEW AND REFRESHER FROM AUGUST CONFERENCE
  • Conde Kunzman and Doreen Fuller

4
Schools do make a difference.
  • Ron Edmonds, Lawrence Lezotte, Wilbur Brookover,
    Michael Rutter on Effective Schools
  • All children can learn!
  • Schools control the factors assuring that
    students master the core of the curriculum.
  • Robert Marzano, What Works in Schools (2003)
  • An analysis of research conducted over a
    35-year period demonstrates that schools that are
    highly effective produce results that almost
    entirely overcome the effects of student
    backgrounds.
  • Douglas Reeves
  • 90-90-90 Schools

C. Weber Presentation, August 2010
5
Reading Statistics
  • 5 of children learn to read effortlessly
  • 20-30 learn relatively easily once exposed to
    reading instruction
  • For 60 of children learning to read is a much
    more formidable task
  • For at least 20-30 of children, reading is one
    of the most difficult tasks that they will have
    to master.
  • For 5 of students even with explicit and
    systematic instruction, reading will continue to
    be a challenge.
  • MacKenzie (2000), citing statistics from Lyon,
    Kammeenue, Simmons, et al.

6
Research MS and HS
  • Approximately two-thirds of eighth- and twelfth-
    grade students read at less than the proficient
    level as described by NAEP (National Institute
    for Literacy, 2006).
  • Approximately 32 percent of high school graduates
    are not ready for college-level English
    composition courses (ACT, 2005).
  • Over half of adults scoring at the lowest
    literacy levels are drop-outs and almost a
    quarter are high school graduates (NCES, 2005).
  • Approximately 40 percent of high school graduates
    lack the literacy skills employers seek (Achieve,
    Inc., 2005).
  • U.S. drop-outs literacy skills are lower than
    most industrialized nations, performing
    comparably only to Chile, Poland, Portugal and
    Slovenia (OECD, 2000).
  • A full 70 percent of U.S. middle and high school
    students require differentiated instructionthat
    is, instruction targeted to their individual
    strengths and weaknesses (Alliance for Excellent
    Education for the Carnegie Corporation of New
    York).

C. Weber Presentation, August 2010
7
For all students to learn, we must
  • Start with highly effective, research-based,
    differentiated core instruction.
  • Systematically identify students who are not
    succeeding in our core program.
  • Provide these students additional time and
    support until they learn.

C. Weber Presentation, August 2010
8
Sacramento County Office of Education
9
Sacramento County Office of Education
10
Sacramento County Office of Education
11
RTI Framework
  • A system that
  • Provides high-quality instruction and
    intervention matched to student need
  • Monitors progress frequently to make decisions
    about change in instruction or learning goals
  • Applies student response data for making
    important educational decisions, including
    determining special education eligibility
  • (Adapted from National Association of State
  • Directors of Special Education, 2005)

12
Tier 3 Intensive Interventions
Tier 2 Supplemental Interventions
Tier 1 Core Program
13
Tier 3 Intensive Interventions
Tier 2 Supplemental Interventions
Tier 1 Core Program
14
Tier 3 Intensive Interventions
Tier 2 Supplemental Interventions
Tier 1 Core Program
15
Three Tiered Model of School Supports
C. Weber Presentation, August 2010
16
  • Pyramid of Interventions

TIER 4 SST DRIVEN LEARNING
Increasing Intensity of Intervention
Decreasing numbers of students
  • TIER 3
  • INTENSIVE
  • INTERVENTIONS

TIER 2 STRATEGIC INTERVENTIONS/ NEEDS BASED
LEARNING
FLUID GROUPS
  • TIER 1
  • BENCHMARK RETEACHING IN
  • STANDARDS-BASED CLASSROOM LEARNING

17
Why adopt an RTI model?
  • Because 34 CFR 300-306(b) tells us a child shall
    not be determined to be a child with a disability
    if the determinant factor is
  • Lack of appropriate instruction in reading (as
    defined by NCLB)
  • Lack of appropriate instruction in math
  • Limited English proficiency
  • Rather than a focus upon identification and
    placement, we needed a focus upon student
    outcomes.

C. Weber Presentation, August 2010
18
Core Principles
  • Do we really believe that
  • All students can learn?
  • Effective instruction in general education is
    foundation for all decision-making?
  • Data should guide decisions regarding core,
    supplemental and comprehensive instruction/interve
    ntions?
  • Infrastructure for core, supplemental and
    comprehensive cycles must be evidence-based and
    integrated?

19
RtI2 Core Principals
  • ALL students are part of ONE proactive and
    responsive educational system
  • Belief that we can effectively teach ALL students
  • Belief that ALL children can learn
  • Belief that failure can be avoided with
    prevention, stopped with early and effective
    intervention
  • Belief that early indicators of future problems
    are identifiable
  • Use of ALL available resources to teach ALL
    students
  • Belief that all students are everyones
    responsibility

ACSA-CASP RtI Project 2008
20
The BIG Ideas of RtI2
  • Decide what is important for students to know
  • Teach what is important for students to know
  • Keep track of how students are doing
  • Make changes according to the results you collect

21
Thoughts to Rememberfrom the Kennewick School
District
  • You can either fight assessment or embrace it.
    However, you cannot be a high-performance school
    without embracing assessment.
  • -Dave Montague, Principal Washington Elementary
    in Kennewick, WA
  • Students who are behind do not learn faster than
    those who are ahead.
  • -Lynn Fielding, Board Member in Kennewick School
    District, WA

22
Thoughts to Remember
Perhaps the most important change in thinking
that is needed to move all students toward
proficiency in basic skills is framing ALL
achievement problems in terms of variables that
teachers control.
23
UNDERSTANDING UNIVERSAL SCREENING AND INITIAL
IDENTIFICATION
  • Rita Mitchell

24
Rtl Universal Screening
  • Refers to a systematic process of detecting a
    subset of students from the entire student
    population who are struggling and are at-risk for
    experiencing a range of negative short- and
    long-term outcomes

25
Goals of Screening
  • Fast, efficient, and respectful
  • Include all children and youth of interest

26
Universal Screening Outcomes
  • Reduces discretion in teacher referral process
  • Each student identified must be served
  • Assess prevalence and build systems to match
    needs

27
Universal Screening Outcomes
  • Process of finding the right customers
  • Decision Making Rules
  • Core, strategic, intensive tiers
  • Using cut scores

28
Cut Scores for First Grade
l Assessments
29
Cut Scores for Fifth Grade
30
Cut Scores Sixth, Seventh, Eighth Grade
31
Activity
  • With your team or colleagues sitting near you,
    discuss the following questions.
  • If we were able to do universal screening across
    the grade levels in Academics what advantages
    would there be for
  • Teachers?
  • Parents?
  • Students?

32
DELIVERING QUALITY TEACHING OF CORE PROGRAMS
WITH DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION IN-CLASS
MONITORING
  • Rob Adams

33
What do the experts call it?
  • How does your school go about making sure that
    your student have Guaranteed Curriculum or
    Challenging Goals or Effective Feedback?

34
Familiar with the following events?
  • 1st grade class, children independently complete
    practice pages from a workbook
  • 4th grade class, students are assigned a writing
    prompt and have 30 minutes to respond
  • 8th grade class, students are told to read a
    particular textbook chapter and then answer the
    questions at the end of the chapter.
  • 9th grade algebra class, students are given 15
    problems and told to work on them quietly in
    class and finish the problems for homework.

35
Guaranteed Means..
  • Time is variable based on student needs
  • Essential content is agreed upon by all
  • Essential content is organized and used by all
  • Highly Effective Instruction in all classrooms

36
What is your Guaranteed Instruction?
  • Discuss the common instructional commitments that
    your school has made around instruction?
  • Learning goals?
  • CFU?
  • Engagement?
  • Other?
  • How do people know when they are doing it?

Team Time 10 Minutes
37
One model might look like
Debra Pickering Asilomar 2010
38
The Art and Science of Teaching
SEGMENTS ENACTED ON THE SPOT
ROUTINE SEGMENTS
CONTENT SPECIFIC SEGMENTS
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If school had such a Model/Language of
Instruction
when new ideas/products emerge
41
If school had such a Model/Language of
Instruction
when new ideas/products emerge
42
If school had such a Model/Language of
Instruction
when new ideas/products emerge
43
If school had such a Model/Language of
Instruction
when new ideas/products emerge
44
How do you develop this?
  • First, what areas of teacher expertise would you
    want to be included in your model of instruction?
  • Then, develop an agreed-upon common
    language/model of instruction.
  • Finally, develop criteria for evaluating each
    aspect of teacher expertise included in your
    model.

45
Another Model
  • Areas of Expertise in model
  • Instructional Communication
  • Engagement
  • Direct Instruction
  • Classroom Management

46
Another Model
  • Then, Develop an agreed-upon common
    language/model of instruction.
  • Finally, Develop criteria for evaluating each
    aspect of teacher expertise included in your
    model.

47
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51
How to use?
  • Teachers use for Self Reflection
  • Principal and other teachers do learning walks
  • Do school visits and look for strategies that fit
    your model to integrate
  • Video tape instruction and hold instructional
    labs
  • Focus staff conversations or staff development
  • Collaboration or coaching

52
Assumptions Behind Differentiated Instruction
53
Assumptions about Differentiation
  • Learners in virtually all classrooms at all grade
    levels and in all subjects vary significantly in
    their readiness to learn particular topics at a
    given time, in their interests, and in ways they
    learn best.
  • Readiness, interests, and learning profile are
    shaped by a students experiences, culture,
    gender, and biology.
  • Most students can achieve far more than we tend
    to think they can if teachers provide rich,
    engaging, supportive environments with a balance
    of continuously escalating expectations and joy
    in learning.
  • Responsive teaching is flexible teaching.
  • Students are generally more motivated to learn
    and make greater achievement gains when teachers
    respond effectively to their particular readiness
    levels, interests, and learning profiles.
  • To teach responsively, teachers need to develop
    consistently expanding repertoires of
    instructional strategies suited to both the needs
    of learners and the nature of the content they
    are studying.
  • The complexity of the teaching and learning
    process requires that teachers continuously grow
    in instructional proficiency.
  • Expert teachers teach responsively with a focus
    on curricular requirements, needs of individual
    learners, needs of the class as a whole, and ways
    to ensure balanced focus on all three of these
    important elements.
  • Instructional strategies that help teachers
    increase flexibility in the context of
    high-quality curriculum and a positive learning
    environment help students achieve better and
    develop increasing confidence in themselves as
    learners.
  • Responding consistently to students learning
    needs is a powerful way for teachers to
    communicate to students the importance of each
    student to the teacher and to the success of the
    class as a whole.

54
Rack of Learning Options
55
Feeling a bit confined
Feeling a bit overwhelmed
56
Whats the Point?
  • Readiness
  • Growth

Interest Motivation
Learning Profile Efficiency
57
Parts of the Learning Puzzle
Learning Profile
58
The Tipping PointHow Little Things Can Make a
Big DifferenceMalcolm Gladwell 2000
  • Starting epidemics requires concentrating
    resources on a few key areas.
  • Those who are successful at creating social
    epidemics do not just do what they think is
    right. They deliberately test their intuitions.
  • Look at the world around you. It may seem like
    an immovable, implacable place. It is not. With
    the slightest push in just the right place it
    can be tipped.

59
Essential Standards, In-Class Monitoring,
Benchmark Assessments, and Reteaching, and Next
Steps Based on Data
  • Jennifer Baker

60
What are Essential Standards?
  • Grade level/content standards that students must
    master in order to be successful in school.

61
Essential standards
  • PURPOSE
  • To determine which standards should be taught to
    MASTERY for all students.
  • To explicitly articulate HIGH EXPECTATIONS for
    all students.

62
Essential Standards Core Curriculum
A subset of skills concepts
Essential Standards
CA Standards
Enrichment
63
How are Essential Standards developed?
  • Review CST Blueprint weights
  • Determine which standards are critical for
    success in current grade level standards
  • Determine which standards are critical for
    success in subsequent grade levels
  • Cross grade level articulation

64
Selecting Essential Standards
  • Doug Reeves (2002) provides insight that may be
    helpful in selecting Essential Standards
  • Does it have endurance? Do we really expect our
    student to retain the knowledge and the skills
    over time as opposed to merely learning it for a
    test?
  • Does it have leverage? Will proficiency in this
    standard help the student in other areas of the
    curriculum and other academic disciplines?
  • Does it develop student readiness for the next
    level of learning? Is it essential for success
    in the next unit, course, or grade level?

65
Enterprise Elementary Grade 6 Example
66
Essential Standards - Identified on Blueprints
Red Bluff Elementary School District Gr. 2
Example
67
Steps to Implement
  • Input from every teacher highlighted their
    recommendations.
  • Representatives from each grade at each school
    for each subject area (every subject on different
    days) to summarize the recommendations.
  • Vertical team, representing grade spans to look
    across grade levels.
  • Back to all teachers for review and the
    opportunity to provide input.
  • Working draft for 1st year, with feedback
    following year.
  • Adopted by board.

68
Discussion
  • Do a gap analysis
  • where we are now (what do we have in place)?
  • What will it take to get to where we need to be?

Where we need to be
Where we are now
Team Time 5 Minutes
69
Pacing Calendars
  • Standards taught within the same window
  • Common Assessments given in the same time frame
  • Reteaching opportunities that can be shared

70
  • Redding School District
  • Key Standards and Pacing Guide
  • Grade 1 Math Example

71
Modesto City Schools
  • Pacing Plan with Essential Standards Identified
  • CA Treasures 4th Grade
  • Essential Standards in left column represent the
    Essential Standards that are taught during Week 1
    of Unit 2

72
Pacing Guide
73
Discussion
  • Are content specific pacing guides being used
    with fidelity on your campus?
  • Are they allowing enough time to gain master of
    the essential standards?
  • Do they need to be edited?

Team Time 8 Minutes
74
In-Class Monitoring
  • Feedback
  • Checking for Understanding

75
Feedback Process
  • Where am I going?
  • Provide students with a clear and understandable
    vision of the learning target.
  • Use examples and models of strong and weak work.
  • Where am I now?
  • Offer regular descriptive feedback.
  • Checking for Understanding (4-6 times per lesson
    according to Schmoker)
  • Teach students to self-assess and set goals.
  • How can I close the gap?
  • Design lessons to focus on one learning target or
    aspect of quality at a time.
  • Teach students focused revision.
  • Engage students in self-reflection and let them
    keep track of and share their learning.

Seven Strategies of Assessment FOR Learning by
Jan Chappuis (Educational Testing
Service/Assessment Training Institute, 2009)
76
Discussion
  • What does In-Class Monitoring look like on our
    campus?
  • List some Checking for Understanding Strategies
    you use or have seen on your sites.

Team Time 8 Minutes
77
Common Benchmark Assessments
  • Common used by all teachers for a
  • Subject (Algebra 1, English/Language Arts, etc.)
  • Grade
  • Intervention Program (ELA or Math)
  • Formative intended to provide information for
    immediate feedback while the learning is still
    taking place
  • Using common assessments does not in any way mean
    using only common assessments.

78
Essential Standards Benchmark Exams
Options
  • What to Include
  • Assess all standards taught within the
    quarter/trimester, reteach essential standards
    not mastered
  • Assess only essential standards, reteach
    essential standards not mastered
  • When to Include Essential Standards
  • Based on what has been taught
  • All Essential Standards assessed each Benchmark
  • Cumulative over course of the year

Standards can be mastered by individual skill.
79
Assessment Calendar
80
Scoring Assessments
  • Consistency in how accuracy/completeness/points
    are determined
  • Comparison back to Exemplars
  • Writing what does a 4 look like for a 7th
    grader?
  • Math Problem Solving what does a proficient
    response include?
  • Science Investigation what does a proficient
    write up include?

81
Identify Targets for Each Assessments
  • Identify targets and cut scores for each
    assessment
  • Target score we would expect for a proficient
    student
  • Cut score range for extra support
  • Strategic Support
  • Intensive Consideration

82
Clearly Identified Targets
83
Discussion
  • Do we have Benchmark Exams in place, and are they
    being administered with fidelity by all teachers
    during a designated testing window?
  • Are Benchmark Exams analyzed and scored using
    predetermined, clearly identified targets?

Team Time 8 Minutes
84
A Shift from
TO
  • Learning
  • What will I do for students who learned?
  • What will I do for students who didnt understand?
  • Teaching
  • Did I check for understanding?

Thomas Many, Teacher Talk The Collaborative
Teacher (2008)
85
Identify Standards for Reteaching
  • Which Essential Standards need to be retaught to
    the whole class?
  • Which Essential Standards need to be retaught to
    small groups?

86
Determining Standards for Reteaching
Small Group Reteaching
87
Identify Individual Students for Extra Support
88
More Questions to Consider
  • How are students progressing in their knowledge
    of the standards?
  • Analyze strengths obstacles.
  • What are the lowest scoring standards?
  • Determine how to reteach differently than the
    initial instruction.
  • Determine ways to re-assess following reteaching.

89
3 Characteristics of Effective Reteaching
  • They present the concepts differently. Format,
    organization, or method of presentation is
    changed.
  • They engage students differently in the learning.
    Different learning styles or forms of multiple
    intelligence are addressed.
  • They provide students with successful learning
    experiences that leave students better prepared,
    more confident, and more motivated for future
    learning.
  • Hulley Dier, Getting By or Getting Better, 2009.

90
Sample reteaching form
91
Importance of Feedback on Benchmark Results
  • Recognition of the Desired Goal
  • Essential Standard
  • Evidence about Present Position
  • Current level of student work
  • Some Understanding of a Way to Close the Gap
    Between the Two
  • Black William

92
Retesting to Ensure Mastery
  • Following reteaching, students are given the
    opportunity to show mastery of content through
  • Re-assessment
  • Independent work done correctly
  • Observation

93
Discussion
  • How is data being analyzed at our site?
  • Are we using the information from our assessments
    to determine areas for reteaching (both
    whole-class and small group)?
  • Are students given the opportunity to re-test?
  • What methods and materials are being used for
    reteaching?

Team Time 8 Minutes
94
Fairview School
  • Orland School District
  • 3rd-5th grade
  • 57 point API growth 2010

95
IDENTIFYING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
CONSIDERATIONS AND USING PLCS EFFECTIVELY FOR
TIER 1
  • Doreen Fuller and Conde Kunzman

96
Purpose of Focused Professional Development
  • To train all school staff in assessments, data
    analysis, programs, and research-based
    instructional practices and strategies.

97
Focused Professional Development
  • Staff development is linked to data and
    identified student need.
  • Staff are trained in
  • The effective use of data to drive instruction.
  • The adopted core curriculum (SB 472).
  • The appropriate intervention curriculum.
  • The effective implementation of research based
    instructional strategies and interventions,
    including those for ELs.
  • The use of differentiated instruction.
  • Staff are trained in the effective use of
    collaboration time for
  • Analyzing data to make instructional decisions
  • Planning instruction
  • Developing instructional strategies that meet
    diverse learning needs

98
Suggested Steps to Implement Focused Professional
Development
  • Analyze data (state and benchmark) to determine
    areas of need.
  • Provide training, coaching and collaborative
    opportunities for teachers and paraprofessionals
    based on identified areas of need.

99
Professional DevelopmentResources to Consider
  • National Staff Development Councils Standards
    for Professional Development http//www.nsdc.org
    /standards/index.cfm
  • The National Center on Response to Intervention
    http//www.RTI4Success.org
  • The IRIS Center for Training Enhancements
    http//iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu

100
Professional DevelopmentResearch to Consider
  • DuFour, R., Eaker, R., Karhanek, G (2004).
    Whatever It Takes. How professional learning
    communities respond when kids dont learn. (800)
    733-6786
  • Marzano, R. (2003). What works in schools.
    Translating research into action. Alexandria, VA
    Association for Supervision and Curriculum
    Development.
  • McLaughlin, M. and Talbert, J. (in press).
    Communities of Practice and the Work of High
    School Teaching. University of Chicago Press.
  • McTighe, J. Ferrara, S. (1997). Assessing
    Learning in the Classroom. Washington DC
    National Education Association.
  • Reeves, D. (2007). Ahead of the curve The power
    of assessment to transform teaching and learning.
    Bloomington, IN Solution Tree.
  • Schmoker, M. (2006). Results Now. Alexandria, VA
    ASCD.
  • Wellman, B. Lipton, L. (2004). Data-Driven
    Dialogue a Facilitators Guide to Collaborative
    Inquiry. Sherman Mira Via, LLC Publications.

101
Use of PLCs in Your Setting
  • Analyzing the data?
  • Who is doing it?
  • When is it being done?
  • How are the data identified needs integrated into
    the PD plan or collaboration schedule?

102
Team Time
103
Overall Tier I Questions
  • Is our first focus on developing and/or improving
    Tier I?
  • How will the needs identified in the core program
    be addressed?
  • Knowing that every school is at a different
    place, what would be the first three components
    you plan to fully implement?

104
Team Time
105
GRAPHIC REPRESENTATIONS OF RTI
  • .

106
TIER 1 STANDARDS BASED CLASSROOM LEARNING All
students participate in general education
learning that includes Regular use of explicit
instruction Use of active student engagement
strategies Implementation of the standards
through research-based practices Daily
instruction aligned with specified learning
objectives Study skills support Use of
flexible groups for differentiation of
instruction Frequent progress monitoring
On-going formal informal assessments for
learning (incl. analysis of data) Reading
incentive programs Student curricular
non-curricular achievements are recognized
celebrated Character education Regular
two-way communication between home school
Parent-Teacher Conferences Parents are provided
support, strategies, homework tips resource
materials to help their children at
home  Attendance Incentives
ALL STUDENTS
107
  • Lassen View SchoolEESD

TIER 4 SST DRIVEN LEARNING
Counseling Pyramid
Behavior Support
Special ed, RSP visitor Moving to Math SRA Reach
SARB Daily check-in, Behavior support plan
Mental Health Referral Parent Support Group
  • TIER 3 FORMAL INTERVENTIONS
  • Comprehension-Steck-Vaughn, Soar to Success,
    Early Success, guided comprehension
  • Vocab-Steck-Vaughn, guided reading, Eng. from
    roots up - Soar to Success
  • Automaticity/Fluency-Read Naturally, timed
    reading plus, Readers Theater, Jamestown
  • Site Words-Guided reading, Sipps 1,2, Flash cards
    games
  • Phonics-Sipps 1,2,3, Pals Signs for Sounds,
    rewards, scholastic decodables, making words,
    interactive writing, words their way, Eng. from
    the roots up
  • Phonemic Awareness-K-pals, sounds Letters,
    scholastic P/A kit, torgeson P/A in young
    children
  • Concepts of Print-Interactive writing, read
    alouds, guided reading
  • "Caught Ya's
  • Behavior tracking-
  • formal behavior card, small rewards/consequences
    at school, home.
  • Grade level regroup (maybe PE time) reteach kids
    who don't get it, social skills, sharing, taking
    turns.

TIER 2 NEEDS BASED LEARNING
  • Referral to our counselor
  • Social Skills Group
  • Caring Adult Mentor
  • Regroup for Social Skills
  • Playground buddy
  • Parent teacher contacts
  • Differentiated/Leveled Classes
  • (Math/L.A.) Peer Coaching
  • RSP/SDC Support Collaboration
  • protected times Accomodations
  • Reteaching based on item analysis
  • Develop short term assessments
  • frequency

Cross-Age Tutoring Caring Adult-Mentor Student
Connections With School Learning Mentoring
with Adult Clubs Student Jobs Student
Government
  • Parent teacher conference-communication notebook,
    card, take a knee, keep struggling, students in 5
    min at recess-reteach.
  • Walk through/model behavior
  • Teach whole class
  • Behavior Expectations

Identify At Risk Academic Behavior/Behavior
Support/Counseling Piece/modification
  • TIER 1 STANDARDS-BASED CLASSROOM LEARNING
  • Teacher referral to Remi Vista
  • Second Steps
  • Character ed and assemblies
  • Too Good for Violence curriculum

Explicit Instruction/Active Student
Engagement Parent teacher Communication Grade
levels review key essential learnings Adhere to
scheduled groups for differentiated
learning/small group instruction
Assessment-concept/Trimester Study Skills
Support Panther Store-more frequent Reading
Math Incentive Programs
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Sacramento County Office of Education
110
RTI COMMERCIAL MODELS
  • .

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RtI Models - TLC
  • Teaming for the Learning of all Children
  • In TLC schools, staff universally screen
    students, using both standardized
    multiple-response examinations and other CBM-like
    assessments. TLC schools utilize four additional
    special education staff members (two
    certificated, two paraprofessionals) to help meet
    student needs in reading and mathematics,
    regardless of the students special education
    status.
  • TLC educators try to serve the needs of students
    with individualized education plans (IEPs) within
    regular classroom settings. In each grade,
    students with similar needs are distributed among
    regular education teachers and special education
    staff. Expert. Highly trained educators teach
    students at risk in small groups of four to six.

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TLC Continued
  • Content and Concepts are the same as in the core
    curriculum
  • Instruction, pedagogic approach and pacing are
    adjusted to meet specific needs
  • Instructors meet unique student needs with
    differentiated small groups
  • Classroom teachers often offer students a second,
    and even third, iteration of core reading and
    math instruction during leveled instructional
    time
  • Students move fluidly between leveled groups.
  • Leadership teams make decisions concerning
    movement of students.

113
ExCEL
  • Excellence A Commitment to Every Learner
  • ExCEL attempts to assist all students, whether
    they are high achieving, struggling, or in
    between.
  • Student movement is fluid continuum
  • Changes in the intensity and nature supports are
    frequent
  • Systems first priority is universal access to a
    high-quality core program for all students
  • Tier II involves small groups that are leveled
    according to student ability
  • Progress Monitoring is frequent
  • Expectations for all students are high

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CAST
  • Collaborative Academic Support Teams
  • Interventions are the responsibility of the
    general education staff
  • Special education teachers are not responsible
    for remediating students at risk
  • Teams of teachers examine students learning
    trajectory
  • Specialists periodically support the classroom
    teacher in delivering targeted interventions
  • Tier III intensive instruction supplants core
    curriculum

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The HAEA Model
  • Heartland Area Education Agency
  • Problem Solving model in which teachers identify
    and refer children who need additional assistance
    on a case-by-case, student-by-student basis.
  • Teachers trained in special education support
    general education classroom teachers in providing
    increasingly intensive interventions

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QUICK SUMMARY AND REVIEW
  • No, we will not go through each slide in detail.

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Universal Screenings
  • Systematic process of detecting a subset of
    students from the entire student population who
    are struggling and are at-risk for experiencing a
    range of negative short- and long-term outcomes
  • Goals fast, efficient, and respectful includes
    all children and youth of interest
  • Assess prevalence and build systems to match
    needs. A system in which all identified students
    are served
  • Decision Making Rules are established and
    followed

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Teaching Core Programs Well
  • Time is variable based on student needs
  • Essential content is agreed upon by all
  • Essential content is organized and used by all
  • Highly Effective Instruction in all classrooms
  • Develop an agreed-upon common language/model of
    instruction.
  • Develop criteria for evaluating each aspect of
    teacher expertise included in your model.

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Maximized Instructional Time
  • PURPOSE To keep students actively involved and
    engaged with learning from bell to bell.
  • Students are actively engaged in grade level or
    intervention work.
  • Routines are established to save time in
    transitions.
  • Interruptions to classrooms during instructional
    time are minimal.

120
Suggested Steps to Implement Maximized
Instructional Time
  • Discuss what interruptions currently interrupt
    instruction (phone calls, announcements, fire
    drills, assemblies, etc.).
  • Determine if there is a way to reduce the
    interruptions especially during ELA Math time.
  • Agree as a staff on routines to established in
    each classroom/small group to allow for smooth
    transitions and minimal time wasted
  • What students are to do when they enter the
    classroom (bell work, etc.)
  • How homework is to be collected
  • Lining up within the classroom for lunch, etc.
  • Walking down the hall
  • Others?
  • Determine when/how to share active engagement
    strategies with the staff so that discussions
    about the use of these strategies becomes a
    regular part of collaboration and/or staff
    meeting time.

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Maximized Instructional TimeQuestions to
Consider
  • Are students actively engaged in work related to
    grade level standards or work to accelerate
    achievement to grade level standards
    (intervention)?
  • Are we using the most efficient ways to help
    students learn?
  • Are students engaged and learning from bell to
    bell?
  • Is the instructional day scheduled such that
    academic, engaged time is THE priority?
  • Resource Increasing Student Engagement and
    Motivation From Time-on-Task to Homework by
    Brewster Fager, October 2000 (NWREL)
    http//www.nwrel.org/request/oct00/textonly.html

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In-Class Monitoring
  • Purpose To monitor progress on a regular basis
    - for students participating in classroom
    interventions - to allow teachers to make
    educational decisions that reflect a student's
    response to any given intervention.
  • Students are actively engaged.
  • Checking for understanding.
  • Individual student written responses (white
    board, ticket out the door, timed math facts,
    etc.)
  • Individual student oral responses (CBM,
    explaining your thinking, explaining how you
    solved a problem, etc.)
  • Providing on-going feedback.
  • Who All students receiving in-class
    intervention
  • When Weekly or Biweekly (some components are
    daily)
  • Provider Classroom teacher or paraprofessional
  • Format Within small group

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Suggested Steps to Implement In-Class Monitoring
  • Identify current level/needs of student
  • Identify target/goal to achieve
  • Determine incremental steps needed to meet the
    target/goal
  • Chart progress toward target/goal
  • Modify instruction as needed

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In-Class MonitoringQuestions to Consider
  • What measures are used in the classroom
    intervention group to monitor progress?
  • Is this information gathered often enough to
    allow teachers to change interventions if
    students are not making progress when the program
    is being followed with fidelity?
  • Does the monitoring of progress provide a way of
    measuring growth compared to other students?
  • Resources
  • National Center on Student Progress Monitoring
    www.studentprogress.org/chart/chart.asp
  • Research Institute on Progress Monitoring
    www.progressmonitoring.org
  • DIBELS (University of Oregon) http//dibels.uoreg
    on.edu
  • AIMSweb http//aimsweb.com
  • Yearly Progress Pro (McGraw Hill)
    http//www.ctb.com/mktg/ypp/ypp_index.jsp
  • Info on curriculum-based measurement (CBM)
    http//www.interventioncentral.org/htmdocs/interve
    ntions/cbmwarehouse.php
  • National Center on Response to Intervention
    www.rti4success.org

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In-Class Interventions
  • Purpose To begin immediately to address needs of
    students
  • Who Any Student having difficulty with the core
    curriculum
  • What Research based and likely to be effective
  • When 2-3 times per week
  • Provider Classroom teacher or paraprofessional
  • Format Small group based on like needs

126
Suggested Steps to Implement In-Class
Interventions
  • Determine concepts/standards students are
    struggling with from the core curriculum
  • Look for Reteaching and Universal Access
    materials that address this concept/standard.
  • Determine a time within the core where small
    group instruction could be implemented.

127
In-Class InterventionsQuestions to Consider
  • Do teachers know how to adjust classroom
    instruction to provide support?
  • Do teachers know how to access the reteaching
    components and Universal Access components of the
    core program?
  • Possible Resources
  • Florida Center for Reading Research www.fcrr.org
  • What Works Clearinghouse http//ies.ed.gov/ncee/ww
    c/
  • Oregon Reading First http//oregonreadingfirst.uor
    egon.edu/inst_curr_review.html

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Professional Development
  • Purpose To train all school staff in
    assessments, data analysis, programs, and
    research-based instructional practices and
    strategies
  • Linked to data and identified student need.
  • Training in using data core curriculum
    intervention curriculum research based
    strategies differentiated instruction
  • Collaboration is effective, with results
    impacting the PD schedule and collaboration time.

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Tier 1 Components
  • Universal Screening
  • Initial Intervention
  • Strong Research-Based Core Curriculum
  • Quality Teaching with Differentiated Instruction
  • Benchmark Assessments
  • Essential Standards to Determine Areas for
    Reteaching
  • Focused Professional Development
  • Maximized Instructional Time
  • In Class Interventions
  • In Class Monitoring

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The BIG Ideas of RtI
  • Decide what is important for students to know
  • Teach what is important for students to know
  • Keep track of how students are doing
  • Make changes according to the results you collect
  • Dave Tilly, Heartland AEA 2003

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Team Time
  • Review what your site currently has in place as a
    model for RtI.
  • Review what your site currently has in place for
    supporting Tier One instruction.
  • Prioritize your Next Steps, including
    timelines.
  • Determine how to share this with staff.

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Team Time
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