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SEABEE COMBAT WARFARE COMMON CORE Unit 111 Chemical

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Title: SEABEE COMBAT WARFARE COMMON CORE Unit 111 Chemical


1
SEABEE COMBAT WARFARECOMMON CORE
  • Unit 111
  • Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Warfare
    Fundamentals

15 MARCH 2007
2
CBR Warfare
  • References
  • (a) TM EE168-DB-OMP-010, Operators and Unit
    Maintenance Manual for Alarm, Chemical Agent,
    Automatic, M-22
  • (b) NAVEDTRA 14057, Damage Controlman
  • (c) NAVEDTRA 14235 Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol 2
  • (d) TM 3-4240-346-109 Chemical Biological Mask,
    Type M-40A

3
CBR Warfare
  • (e) NAVEDTRA 14234 Seabee Combat Handbook, Vol 1
  • (f) FM 3-4, NMC Protection
  • (g) NAVMED P-5041 Treatment of Chemical Agent
    Casualties
  • (h) FM 3-3 Chemical and Biological Contamination
    Avoidance
  • (i) FM 3-5, NBC Decontamination
  • (j) Multiservice Tactics, Techniques, and
    Procedures for NBC Protection

4
CBR Warfare
  • (k) TM SS200-AP-MMO-010 Operator Manual for
    Joint Service Lightweight Integrated Suit
    Technology (JLIST) Chemical Protective Ensemble
  • (l) FM 3-7, NBC Field Handbook

5
Overview
  • Chemical Warfare
  • Radiological Warfare
  • Biological Warfare
  • Personal Protection Equipment
  • Chemical warfare agents and their physical
    symptoms.
  • Types and effects of nuclear explosions

6
Overview
  • Mission Oriented Protective Posture levels and
    procedures for attaining
  • NATO CBR marker signs
  • M-9 Chemical agent detector paper
  • Nerve Agents
  • M258A1 and M291 decontamination kits
  • Usability of the JLIST suit

7
Overview
  • Types of decontamination
  • Personnel decontamination stations.
  • CBR Team duties
  • M8A1 Chemical Alarm
  • CBR Surveys and their uses
  • Liquid mustard agent
  • Elements of a CBR attack

8
US POLICYNUCLEAR WEAPONS
  • The US may use nuclear weapons to terminate a
    conflict or war at the lowest acceptable level of
    hostilities. This is interpreted to mean that the
    US may use nuclear weapons first. The employment
    of nuclear weapons by the US is governed by
    guidance to the joint force commander (JFC) as
    contained in JP 3-12, Doctrine For Joint Nuclear
    Operations, and other strategic level directives.
    The US is party to treaties and international
    agreements that limit proliferation, testing, and
    possession of nuclear weapons.

9
US POLICYCHEM WEAPONS
  • The US will never use chemical weapons. The
    Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), which the US
    ratified on 29 April 1997, bans the acquisition,
    development, production, retention, stockpiling,
    transfer, and use of chemical weapons.

10
US POLICYBIO WEAPONS
  • d. The US will never use biological weapons.
    Under the terms of the Biological Weapons
    Convention (BWC), which the US ratified on 29
    March 1975, parties agreed not to develop,
    produce, stockpile, or acquire biological agents
    or toxins of types and in quantities that have no
    justification for prophylactic, protective, or
    other peaceful purposes.
  • FM 3-11

11
CBR Warfare
  • PQS Question 111.1 Explain the following
  • Chemical Warfare
  • Biological Warfare
  • Radiological Warfare
  • Routes by which agents enter the body.
  • Reference (e, Ch 9) NAVEDTRA 14234 Seabee
    Combat Handbook, Vol 1

12
Chemical Warfare
  • Chemical Warfare
  • Produces physiological and psychological effect
  • Delivered in liquid and vapor form
  • Causes casualties
  • Degrades performance
  • Disrupts support
  • Restricts maneuvers

13
Chemical Warfare
  • Chemical agents are used to produce death,
    injury, temporary incapacitation, or irritating
    effects.
  • Three types of antipersonnel agents
  • Casualty (nerve, blister, choking, blood)
  • Incapacitating (symptoms vary)
  • Harassing (tear and vomiting gases)

14
Biological Warfare
Biological Warfare
  • The intentional release of living organisms or
    substances produced by living organisms to cause
    Death or Disease

15
Biological Warfare
  • Biological operations use living organisms to
    cause disease or death.
  • Cause diseases such as typhoid fever, cholera,
    and influenza.
  • Difficult to detect because evidence of attack
    isnt discovered until after personnel show signs
    of exposure.

16
Radiological Warfare
  • Nuclear weapons produce explosions of great force
    and heat and release nuclear radiation. Their
    primary purpose is the mass destruction of
    property and personnel.

17
CBR Warfare
  • Routes by which agents enter the body
  • Breathing
  • Absorption through skin, eyes, mucus membranes
  • Ingestion

18
CBR Warfare
  • PQS Question 111.2 Describe the purpose of the
    following
  • MCU-2P Mask
  • Chemical protective overgarment
  • Wet-weather clothing
  • Atropine/2pam chloride autoinjector
  • Pocket dosimeter
  • Reference NAVEDTRA 12043, Basic Military
    Requirements

19
Chemical Weapons
MCU-2/P Protective Mask
  • Protects face, eyes, nose, throat and lungs from
    CBR agents or contamination
  • Offers no protection against carbon monoxide or
    ammonia
  • Filters the air removing particles of dust that
    may be radioactive or otherwise contaminated
  • Purifies the air of many poisonous gases.

20
ProtectiveEquipment
  • Chemical Protective Ensemble
  • The JSLIST overgarment is designed to replace
    the Battle Dress Overgarment, the USMC Saratoga,
    and the Navy Chemical Protective Overgarment. It
    is lighter and less bulky than the previous
    Battle Dress Overgarment (BDO) chemical
    protective garments, is durable for 45 days, can
    be laundered up to six times and provides 24
    hours of protection against liquid and vapor
    chemical challenges.

21
Protective Equipment
  • Wet-weather clothing
  • Provides complete protection against alpha/beta
    radiological contamination when worn with battle
    dress and antiflash gear
  • Provides an extra layer of protection for the
    chemical protective overgarment.

22
ProtectiveEquipment
  • Atropine/2Pam Chloride auto-injector
  • Used to counteract the effects of and relieve the
    symptoms of nerve agents only.

23
Protective Equipment
  • Pocket Dosimeter
  • Size and shape of a fountain pen.
  • Measure exposure to radiation over a period of
    time

24
M-40A Mask
  • PQS Question 111.3 Describe the operation and
    maintenance of the M-40A mask.
  • Reference (d, Ch 2 3) TM 3-4240-346-109
  • Chemical Biological Mask, type M-20A

25
M-40A
  • 1. Place your chin in.
  • 2. Cover openings at bottom of outlet valve and
    breathe out hard so that air escapes around the
    edges of
  • facepiece.
  • 3. Cover inlet port of canister and breath in.
    Facepiece should collapse against your face, and
    remain so while you hold your breath. If it does,
    you have an airtight seal. If it does not
    collapse check for matter between face piece and
    your face.
  • 4. Grasp tab and pull head harness over your head
    after establishing an airtight seal.

26
M-40A
  • The only authorized cleaning agent for your FPM
    is WARM SOAPY WATER.
  • Remove the canister before cleaning the mask.
    Clean the mask. Clean the mask inside and out,
    using a clean cloth dipped in the soapy water.
  • Rinse by wiping with a clean cloth that has been
    dipped in warm clear water.
  • Either wipe the facepiece with a clean, lint
    free cloth or air-dry.

27
CBR Warfare
  • PQS Question 111.4 Explain the six types of
    chemical warfare agents and their physical
    symptoms.
  • Reference NAVEDTRA 12043, Basic Military
    Requirements

28
Six Types of Chemical Agents
  • Nerve Agents -Blister Agents
  • Blood Agents -Choking Agents
  • Vomiting Agents -Tear Agents

29
Nerve Agents
  • Types
  • G Agents
  • V Agents
  • Use Quick-action casualty agent

30
Nerve Agents
  • Symptoms of Nerve Agents
  • Runny Nose
  • Tightness of chest with difficulty in breathing
  • Contraction of pupils
  • Nausea, cramps, headache, coma and convulsions
  • Symptoms can take place in 30 seconds when
  • the dose is sufficiently heavy

31
Blister Agents
  • Types
  • Mustards
  • Phosgeneoximedichloroforoxime
  • Lewisite
  • Use Delayed-action casualty agent

32
Blister Agents
  • Symptoms of Blister Agents
  • Eyes
  • Redness and inflammation
  • Watery
  • Skin
  • Skin starts to turn red after several hours
  • Blisters appear on the skin
  • Throbbing pain and swelling may be observed

33
Blood Agents
  • Types
  • Hydrogen Cyanide
  • Cyanogen Chloride
  • Use Quick-Action casualty agent

34
Blood Agents
  • Symptoms of blood agents.
  • Range from convulsions to coma
  • Interfere with the ability of oxygen-carrying
    cells to transfer oxygen to other body tissues
  • Irritating effect on nasal passages.

35
Choking Agents
  • Types
  • Phosgene CG
  • Diphosgene DP
  • Chlorine CL
  • Use Delayed-action casualty agent

36
Choking Agents
  • Symptoms
  • Low Concentrations
  • Produce an action on the respiratory system that
    results in the accumulation of fluid on the lungs
  • Higher Concentrations
  • Produce death for the same reason, but the upper
    respiratory tract may be involved as well

37
Vomiting Agents
  • Symptoms of Vomiting Agents
  • Pepper like burning of the eyes, nose, throat,
    and air passages
  • Repeated coughing and sneezing
  • Continue after donning a mask
  • Become sick to the point of vomiting
  • Exposed to even more hazardous agent when the
    mask is removed for vomiting

38
Tear Agents
  • Symptoms
  • Act primarily on the eyes, causing intense pain
    and a considerable flow of tears
  • High concentrations affect the upper respiratory
    tract and lungs and cause nausea and vomiting

39
CBR Warfare
  • PQS Question 111.5 Describe the following types
    of nuclear explosions.
  • Air burst
  • Surface burst
  • Underwater burst
  • Reference NAVEDTRA 12043, Basic Military
    Requirements

40
Nuclear Explosions
  • Air Burst
  • Fire ball does not touch the earth
  • All materials in fireball vaporized
  • Maximize blast and thermal effect over large area

41
Nuclear Explosions
  • Surface Burst
  • Fireball touches earth
  • Surface material vaporized and lifted in air
  • Produces large amounts of fallout
  • Range of blast less than air burst

42
Nuclear Explosions
  • Underwater Burst
  • Practically all thermal radiation absorbed
  • Large base serge is formed which billows up
    several hundred feet

43
CBR Warfare
  • PQS Question 111.6 Describe the following
    effects of nuclear explosions.
  • Blast
  • Burns
  • Nuclear radiation
  • Electromagnetic Pulse phenomenon
  • Reference NAVEDTRA 12043, Basic Military
    Requirements. NAVEDTRA 10572, Damage Controlman
    3 2

44
Nuclear Explosions
  • Blast
  • Primary blast injuries result from the direct
    action of the air shock wave on the human body.
  • Secondary blast injuries are caused mainly by
    collapsing buildings and by timber and other
    debris flung about by the blast.

45
Nuclear Explosions
  • Burns
  • Primary burns are a direct result of the thermal
    radiation from the bomb.
  • Secondary burns are the result of fires caused by
    the explosion.
  • Flash blindness

46
Nuclear Explosions
  • Nuclear Radiation
  • Alpha particles Must be taken into the body
    through ingestion or cuts to be injurious.
  • Beta particles Enter through the skin or
    ingestion, carried in contaminated dust, dirt,
    or bomb residue

47
Nuclear Explosions
  • Nuclear Radiation
  • Gamma Rays Pure energy and not easily stopped,
    can penetrate every region of the body.
  • Gamma rays strike atoms in the body cause
    ionization of these atoms, which may result in
    any number of possible chemical reactions that
    damage the cells of the body.


48
Nuclear Explosions
  • Nuclear Radiation
  • Neutrons Have the greatest penetrating power of
    the nuclear radiation hazards, create hazards to
    personnel when the neutron is captured in atoms
    of various elements in the body, atmosphere,
    water, or soil.
  • The captured elements become radioactive and
    release gamma rays and beta particles.

49
Nuclear Explosions
  • Electromagnetic Pulse phenomenon
  • An EMP is an intense burst of radio- frequency
    radiation generated by a nuclear explosion.
  • The strong, quick-rising surges of electric
    current induced by EMP in power transmission
    lines and long antennas could burn out most
    unprotected electrical and electronic equipment.

50
CBR Warfare
  • PQS Question 111.7 Define Mission Oriented
    Protective Posture and describe the levels.
  • Reference NAVEDTRA 14234, Seabee Combat
    Handbook, Volume 1

51
M
ission
MOPP 0 MOPP I
O
riented
MOPP II MOPP III MOPP IV
P
rotective
NOTE MOPP Levels 1-4 can be either Open or
Closed reference unit SOP
P
osture
52

53
(No Transcript)
54
CBR Warfare
  • PQS Question 111.8 Describe the correct
    procedures for inspecting, maintaining, and
    donning the chemical protective ensemble.
  • Reference NAVEDTRA 14235, Seabee Combat
    Handbook, Volume 2

55
Protective Clothing
Chemical Protective Ensemble
56
Chemical Protective Overgarment
Protective Clothing
57
Inspect and Maintain CPO
Protective Clothing
  • CPO Inspection
  • Packaging
  • Expiration date
  • Tears
  • Gloves and Boots
  • Inspect for wear and tears
  • CPO Maintenance
  • Keep dry
  • Store in bag when not worn
  • Avoid POLs

58
Donning the Chemical Protective Overgarment1.
Don the trousers and tighten the waist by using
the hook and pile fasteners.2. Bring the straps
over your shoulders and cross them across your
chest. Insert straps into the belt loops and
secure them snugly.3. Don the smock.4. Secure
bottom of smock with hook and pile fasteners.
Protective Clothing
59
Protective Clothing
  • Donning the overboots.
  • 1. Attach the laces to the toe loop, making sure
    that the laces are centered.
  • 2. Put a lace through each of the holes on the
    sides of the boot and pull them up snug.
  • 3. Cross the laces over the instep.
  • 4. Put one lace through each of the holes at the
    heal, inserting them from inside to outside and
    pulling the laces snug.

60
Protective Clothing
  • 5. Again cross the laces ver the instep.
  • 6. Thread the laces through the holes on the
    side again from inside to outside
  • 7. Cross the laces over the instep one more time
    and pull them snug
  • 8. Wrap the laces behind the ankle and back to
    the front. Tie the laces securely.

61
Protective Clothing
  • Notes
  • Trousers are worn over the boots
  • White cotton undergloves and black, butyl rubber
    chemical protective outer gloves are worn under
    the sleeves.
  • The use of masking tape at the wrists and ankles
    is a common procedure to protect against
    loosening of hook and pile seals and to provide
    additional sealant protection.

62
MCU-2/P MASK Inspection
1. Head Harness 2.Buckle 3. Tabs
63
MCU-2/P Inspection
11. Inlet valve disk
12. Outlet Valve Disk
15. Internal Drinking Tube
16. Nosecup
64
MCU-2/P Maintenance
Protective Equipment
  • Cleaning and Care
  • Clean with warm soapy water
  • Air dry before storing in carrier
  • Keep filter dry
  • Replace damaged or worn parts
  • Pre-fit mask prior to storing in mask carrier
  • Test drinking tube
  • Conduct negative pressure test

65

Protective Equipment
Donning the Mask 1. Open mask carrier with left
hand 2. Hold bottom of mask carrier with your
left hand while removing the mask with your right
hand. 3. Slide your thumbs inside the facepiece
under all of the head harness straps. Grasp the
top of the facepiece and thrust your chin
forward.
66
Protective Equipment
4. Hold our head still while you raise the mask
to your out-thrust chin and bring the harness
over the back of your head. 5. Center the head
pad 6. Grasp the tab ends of the lower straps and
tighten them. 7. Close the outlet valve with the
heal of your hand. Breath out forcibly to clear
the mask.
67
Protective Equipment
  • 8. Test the mask for fit and for possible
    leakage by placing your palms over the canisters.
    When you inhale normally,no air will enter mask.

68
NATO NBC Markers
  • PQS Question 111.9 Describe the colors and
    markings on the NATO biological, chemical and
    radiological marker signs.
  • Reference (e, Ch 9) NAVEDTRA 14234, Seabee
    Combat Handbook, Volume 1

69
NBC Markers
  • NBC Marking Kit
  • NATO-standard triangular signs
  • Markers are placed outside the contaminated area
  • Markers face out from contamination

70
NBC Markers
  • Chemical Marker

H 091900ZAPR99
71
NBC Markers
  • Biological Marker

72
NBC Markers
  • Radiological Marker

ATOM
091900ZAPR99 150 R/hr H/hr 091200ZAPR99
73
M9 Paper
  • PQS Question 111.10 Describe the color that the
    M-9 chemical agent detector paper turns after it
    comes in contact with a liquid nerve or blister
    agent.
  • Reference (e, Ch 9) NAVEDTRA 14234, Seabee
    Combat Handbook, Volume 1

74
M9 Paper
  • M9 Paper
  • Detects the presence of liquid nerve and blister
    agents.
  • Spots or streaks on the paper appear pink,
    red-brown, red-purple, or any shade of red,
    assume it has been exposed to a chemical agent.

75
Nerve Agents
  • PQS Question 111.12 Explain the following as it
    applies to nerve agents.
  • Symptoms
  • Contents of NAA kit (NAAK)
  • Treatment (self and buddy aid)
  • Reference (e, Ch 9) NAVEDTRA 14234 Seabee
    Combat handbook, Vol 1

76
Nerve Agents
  • Symptoms of nerve agent poisoning
  • Unexplained sudden headache
  • Unexplained runny nose
  • Drooling
  • Difficulty with vision (dimness of vision)
  • Tightness in chest/difficulty in breathing
  • Localized sweating/muscle twitching in
    contaminated area of the skin
  • Stomach cramps
  • Nausea

77
Nerve Agents
  • Severe symptoms. Casualties with severe symptoms
    can experience most or all of the mild symptoms
    and most or all of the symptoms listed below
  • Strange or confused behavior
  • Wheezing, severe difficulty in breathing, and
    coughing

78
Nerve Agents
  • Red eyes with possible tearing
  • Vomiting
  • Severely pinpointed pupils
  • Severe muscular twitching and general weakness
  • Involuntary urination and defecation
  • Convulsions
  • Unconsciousness
  • Respiratory failure

79
Nerve Agents
  • Nerve Agent Antidote Kit (NAAK)
  • Auto-injectors
  • 1 ea Atropine
  • 1 ea 2PAM Chloride

80
Nerve Agents
  • Treatment (Self)
  • Don the protective mask
  • Remove a NAAK from the protective mask carrier
  • Inject the thigh with the first injector from the
    kit (atropine) hold against thigh for at least
    10 seconds

81
Nerve Agents
  • Follow immediately with second injector of 2-pam
    chloride and hold for at least 10 seconds.
  • Bend needle to form a hook and place on the
    protective outergarment
  • Massage injection site if time permits
  • Wait 10 - 15 minutes before administering second
    series of injections (no more than three)
  • Administer the back pressure arm-lift method of
    artificial ventilation if breathing is difficult
    or has ceased.

82
Nerve Agents
  • Treatment (Buddy Aid)
  • Mask the casualty.
  • Using the Naak belonging to the victim,administer
    three sets of injections immediately and in rapid
    succession in the thigh muscle of the log.
  • Hook the expended auto injectors to the
    overgarment pocket flap of the victim.

83
Nerve Agents
  • Administer the back pressure arm-lift method of
    artificial ventilation if breathing is difficult
    or has ceased.
  • Seek medical attention NOW

84
Decontamination Kits
  • PQS Question 112.11 Describe the steps and
    procedures in utilizing the M258A1 and M291
    decontamination kits.
  • Reference (e, Ch 9) NAVEDTRA 14234, Seabee
    Combat Handbook, Volume 1

85
Decontamination Kits
  • Currently being removed from service
  • Replaced by M-291 Kit
  • 6 Packets per kit
  • 3 - 1 Packets (Use for 1 minute)
  • 3 - 2 Packets (Use for 2 minutes)
  • M-280 is large version of M258A1 and is used for
    equipment decon.
  • M258A1 Decontamination

86
Decontamination Kits
  • Steps and procedures for using the M258A1and M291
    decontamination kit for skin
  • Open the decontamination kit, and pull out one
    DECON 1 pad packet by the tab
  • Fold the packet on the solid line marked "BEND",
    then unfold it
  • Tear the packet open quickly at the notch,
    remove, and unfold the pad.

87
Decontamination Kits
  • Wipe your skin for 1 minute.
  • Deposit the pad in a proper container.
  • Pull out one DECON 2 pad packet. Crush the
    enclosed glass ampoules between your thumb and
    fingers.
  • Fold the packet on the solid line marked "CRUSH
    AND BEND", then unfold it.
  • Tear the packet open quickly at the notch, and
    remove the pad.

88
Decontamination Kits
  • Fully open the pad. Let the encased crushed
    glass ampoules fall into a proper container.
  • Wipe the contaminated skin for 2 to 3 minutes.
  • Wipe the contaminated skin for 2 to 3 minutes.

89
Decontamination Kits
  • M291 Skin Decontamination Kit
  • Replaces the M258A1
  • Wallet-like pouch with 6 decon packets
  • Black, reactive, and absorbent resin power
  • Attached strap for inserting finger
  • M-295 is large version of M291 and is used for
    equipment decon.

90
JSLIST
  • PQS Question 111.14 State how long the Joint
    Service Lightweight Integrated Suit Technology
    (JSLIST) will provide protection from chemical
    agents once they are removed from the packaging
    under the following conditions.
  • Exposed to Chemical Agents
  • Not exposed to Chemical Agents
  • Reference (k) TM SS200-AP-MMO-010 Operator
    Manual for Joint Service Lightweight Integrated
    Suit Technology (JSLIST)

91
JSLIST
  • The Joint Service Lightweight Integrated Suit
    Technology
  • (JSLIST) will replace the CPO suit. It can be
    worn over the uniform, or over undergarments. It
    can be worn up to 45 days in an uncontaminated
    environment, or up to 120 days with up to six
    launderings.

92
JSLIST
  • It can be worn up to 24 hours in a contaminated
    environment, and is available in a woodland or
    desert camo pattern.

93
JSLIST Laundering
  • PQS Question 111.15 Discuss the laundering
    procedures for the JSLIST
  • Reference (k) TM SS200-AP-MMO-010 Operator
    Manual for Joint Service Lightweight Integrated
    Suit Technology (JSLIST)

94
JSLIST
  • Make sure all slide and hook-and-pile fasteners
    are secured to prevent rips during laundering
  • -Use a mild detergent
  • -Wash on PERMANENT PRESS
  • -Tumble dry on GENTLE or hang it up on a
    plastic hangar and let it air dry
  • -Do NOT use bleach or fabric softener
  • -Never dry clean, steam press, or try to
    remove stains on JSLIST

95
Decontamination
  • PQS Question 111.16 Describe the following types
    of decontamination.
  • Immediate
  • Operational
  • Through
  • Reference NAVEDTRA 14235, Seabee Combat
    Handbook, Volume 2

96
Decontamination
  • Immediate
  • Skin decon
  • Operator spraydown
  • Operational
  • Removal of gross contaminants
  • MOPP gear exchange
  • Thorough
  • Detailed troop and equipment decon
  • Reduce contaminants to a negligible risk

97
Decontamination
98
Decontamination
99
Decontamination
100
Decon Station
  • PQS Question 111.17 Describe the procedure for
    setting up a personnel decontamination station.
    (Detailed Troop Decontamination)
  • Reference (c, Ch 6) NAVEDTRA 14235, Seabee
    Combat handbook, Volume 2

101
Detailed TroopDecontamination
  • The DTD is set up in a secure, uncontaminated
    area located as far forward as the tactical
    situation permits.
  • Personnel from both the decontamination and the
    supported unit operate the DTD under the
    supervision of the Chemical, Biological, and
    Radiological Defense Officer or the Disaster
    Preparedness Operations and Training Specialist.

102
Detailed TroopDecontamination
  • Removing contaminated MOPP gear, including the
    Protective mask, is the major action in Detailed
    Troop Decontamination (DTD).
  • If DTD is not performed chemical agents may
    eventually penetrate the over-garment and
    contaminate under clothing or skin.

103
Detailed TroopDecontamination
  • The contaminated unit is responsible for setting
    up, Operating, and closing the DTD in a thorough
    decon site.
  • The CBR Officer recommends to the COC the general
    location of the DTD within the decon site.

104
Detailed TroopDecontamination
105
Detailed TroopDecontamination
CONTAMINATION CONTROL LINE
EQUIPMENT PATH
EQUIPMENT PATH
1
OVERBOOT AND GLOVE DECON
INDIVIDUAL GEAR DECON
7
4
3
2
MASK DECON POINT
OVERBOOTS AND GLOVE REMOVAL
OVERGARMENT REMOVAL
OVERBOOT AND HOOD DECON
ALTERNATE FOR RADIOLOGICAL DECON
SOAPY WATER RINSE SPONGES TOWELS
MASK PATH
5
6
MONITOR
WIND DIRECTION
MASK REMOVAL
LIQUID CONTAMINATION CONTROL LINE
8
VAPOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL LINE
REISSUE POINT
106
Detailed TroopDecontamination
107
Detailed TroopDecontamination
108
Detailed TroopDecontamination

CONTAMINATION CONTROL LINE
EQUIPMENT PATH
EQUIPMENT PATH
1
OVERBOOT AND GLOVE DECON
INDIVIDUAL GEAR DECON
7
4
3
2
MASK DECON POINT
OVERBOOTS AND GLOVE REMOVAL
OVERGARMENT REMOVAL
OVERBOOT AND HOOD DECON
ALTERNATE FOR RADIOLOGICAL DECON
SOAPY WATER RINSE SPONGES TOWELS
MASK PATH
5
6
MONITOR
WIND DIRECTION
MASK REMOVAL
LIQUID CONTAMINATION CONTROL LINE
8
VAPOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL LINE
REISSUE POINT
109
Detailed TroopDecontamination
CONTAMINATION CONTROL LINE
EQUIPMENT PATH
EQUIPMENT PATH
1
OVERBOOT AND GLOVE DECON
INDIVIDUAL GEAR DECON
7
4
3
2
MASK DECON POINT
OVERBOOTS AND GLOVE REMOVAL
OVERGARMENT REMOVAL
OVERBOOT AND HOOD DECON
ALTERNATE FOR RADIOLOGICAL DECON
SOAPY WATER RINSE SPONGES TOWELS
MASK PATH
5
6
MONITOR
WIND DIRECTION
MASK REMOVAL
LIQUID CONTAMINATION CONTROL LINE
8
VAPOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL LINE
REISSUE POINT
110
Detailed TroopDecontamination
111
Detailed Equipment Decontamination
  • PQS Question 111.18 Discuss the procedures for
    setting up a detailed equipment contamination
    line.
  • Reference (c, Ch 6) NAVEDTRA 14235 Seabee Combat
    Warfare Handbook , Vol 2

112
Detailed Equipment Decontamination
  • Procedures for setting up a Detailed Equipment
    Decon are shown in the following slides.
  • DED occurs simultaneously with the DTD, with
    consideration for utilizing the same Vapor
    Contamination Control Line.

113
Detailed Equipment Decontamination
114
Equipment Decontamination
115
CBR Teams
  • PQS Question 111.19 Describe the duties and
    responsibilities of the following CBR teams.
  • Personal DECON
  • Vehicle Decon
  • Survey/Monitor team
  • Reference FM 3-5, NBC Decontamination

116
Duties of CBR Team
  • Personnel Decontamination
  • Set up and operate the Detailed Troop
    Decontamination
  • Equipment Decontamination
  • Set up and operate the Detailed Equipment
    Decontamination
  • Survey/Monitoring Teams
  • Find/identify contamination or monitor
    movement/levels of existing contamination

117
CBR Warfare
  • PQS Question 111.20 State the purpose and the
    optimum location of the M-22 Chemical Alarm
  • Reference NAVEDTRA 12003, Seabee Combat
    Handbook, Volume1

118
M22 Alarm
  • Primary means of detecting blister and nerve
    agents arriving in a unit area from an upwind
    chemical attack.
  • Detects chemical agents in vapor and aerosol form
  • Alerts by audible and visual signal
  • Interfaceable with communications systems to
    support battlefield automation

119
M22
120
M22 Alarm
  • Consist of
  • M88 detector unit
  • M42 alarm unit

121
M22 Alarm
  • M22 Alarm

WIND
M88
M88
M88
M88
M88
M88
300M
300M
300M
300M
150M
150M
M42
M42
M42
M42
M42
M42
400M
???
M42
???
122
CBR Surveys
  • PQS Question 111.21 Explain the three types of
    CBR surveys and their uses.
  • Reference (h, Ch 5) FM 3-3, Chemical and
    Biological Contamination Avoidance

123
Point Survey
  • The point surveillance mission is conducted for a
    specific period of time, oriented to key
    terrain.
  • It is typically conducted to ensure that time
    sensitive or critical operations can be conducted
    without unwarned encounters with chemical agent
    clouds or transfer hazards resulting from
    munitions event

124
Route Survey
  • Routes and specific points may be surveyed if
    that information is usually found during recon
    operations
  • If conducted, the survey team goes to a specific
    point or points along a route and tests for the
    presence of liquid contamination with M8 or M9
    detector paper.

125
Area Survey
  • The goal of an area surveillance mission is to
    provide a tailored detection capability in those
    tactical situations where it is impractical to
    employ remote point samplers, such as M22 system.

126
CBR Warfare
  • PQS Question 111.22 What type of standard
    decontamination reacts violently with liquid
    mustard agent.
  • Reference (i, app D) FM 3-5, NBC Decontamination

127
CBR Warfare
  • Super-tropical bleach STB reacts violently by
    igniting spontaneously upon contact with liquid
    mustard agent.
  • STB should not be inhaled or come in contact with
    the skin. STB gives off toxic vapors upon
    contact with G agents.

128
CBR Warfare
  • PQS Question 111.23 Describe the following as
    it relates to CBR
  • Pre-attack actions
  • Attack
  • After
  • Reference (j, Ch 2) FM 3-7, NBC Field Handbook

129
Chemical Attack Actions
  • Pre-Attack Actions
  • Extended wear of protective clothing. (The
    individual may have to adapt to wearing
    protective clothing and equipment for extended
    periods).
  • M9 Chemical Agent Detector Paper. Attach to
    clothing. If spots or streaks on the paper
    appear pink, red-brown, red-purple or any shade
    of red, assume it has been exposed to a chemical
    agent.

130
Chemical Attack Actions
  • Pre-Attack Actions
  • Alertness and Proficiency. Individuals must
    remain alert and constantly aware of the chemical
    threat.
  • Protection of Individual Equipment. Keep
    equipment and supplies organized and covered.

131
During Attack Actions
Chemical Attack Actions
  • Stop breathing
  • Don Protective mask
  • Give the alarm
  • Continue the mission and wait for further orders.
  • Assist others when the situation permits.

132
Chemical Attack Actions
  • After Attack Actions
  • Remain in protective gear and continue your
    mission.
  • Give first aid to casualties in the immediate
    vicinity when the situation and mission permit.
  • Await the commanders order for unmasking.

133
Nuclear Attack Actions
  • Pre-Attack Actions
  • Fighting Hole
  • The deeper the fighting hole, the more protection
    it provides
  • An overhead covering of earth or other material
    will help reduce the amount of thermal and
    initial nuclear radiation and fallout material
    from reaching the individual.
  • Cover must be sturdy enough to withstand the
    blast wave.

134
Nuclear Attack Actions
  • Pre-Attack Actions
  • Field Shelters. Tunnels, caves, and storm drains
    provide effective shelter. Vehicles made of
    steel provide some protection.
  • Supplies and Equipment. Equipment and supplies
    not being worn should be placed in the fighting
    hole to prevent them from becoming missiles.

135
During Attack Actions
Nuclear Attack Actions
  • Drop Flat on Ground facedown or to the bottom of
    a fighting hole.
  • Close your eyes.
  • Protect exposed skin from heat by putting hands
    and arms near or under your body. Keep your
    helmets on.

136
Nuclear Attack Actions
Nuclear Attack Actions
  • Remain down until after the blast has passed and
    debris has stopped falling.
  • Stay calm, check for injury, check weapons and
    equipment for damage, and prepare to continue the
    mission.

137
Nuclear Attack Actions
  • Nuclear Attack
  • Begin fallout monitoring
  • Bathe and change clothes as soon as possible
  • Avoid breathing dust (place handkerchief or
    similar cloth over mouth)
  • Remember run off water is contaminated

138
Dosimetry Equipment
  • PQS Question 111.24 Explain and discuss the
    following dosimetry equipment
  • IM 143
  • ANPDQ1
  • Reference

139
  • The IM-143/PD is a high range, self reading
    personnel dosimeter used for measuring
    accumulative exposure to gamma radiation. These
    personnel dosimeters are only issued to key
    personnel such as team leaders, scene leaders,
    etc. The device is the size and shape of a ball
    point pen and measures 4 inches long by ½ inch in
    diameter. The IM-143/PD is an ionization chamber
    dosimeter that reads in a range of 0-600
    Roentgens. It should be charged for at least 24
    hours prior to use and recharged daily
    thereafter. The IM-143/PD must be calibrated
    every 24 months.
  • .

140
  • The PP-4276/PD is a charging device that is used
    to set the IM-143/PD to zero, which must be
    accomplished prior to use. The PP-4276/PD is
    powered by one D cell battery and measures 4 by 4
    by 3 ½ inches. To set the IM-143/PD, press it
    firmly down on the PP-4276/PD charging receptacle
    until the light is illuminated and then adjust
    the quartz filament to zero. The PP-4276/PD must
    be calibrated every 60 months

141
IM 143
142
AN/PDQ11
  • The AN/PDQ1 is a type of Geiger counter that
    calculates INTENSITY and DOSAGE
  • INTENSITY is expressed as roentgens per hour
  • (R/hr) or as rads per hour (rad/hr).
  • - DOSAGE is expressed in two values the
  • EXPOSUREDOSE, measured in roentgens, and
  • the ABSORBED DOSE, measured in rads.

143
AN/PDQ1
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