SEABEE COMBAT WARFARE COMMON CORE 103 SAFETY 15 MARCH 200 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – SEABEE COMBAT WARFARE COMMON CORE 103 SAFETY 15 MARCH 200 PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 3bc7be-MDNmO



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

SEABEE COMBAT WARFARE COMMON CORE 103 SAFETY 15 MARCH 200

Description:

SEABEE COMBAT WARFARE COMMON CORE 103 SAFETY 15 MARCH 2007 References OPNAVINST 5100.23F NAVOSH Program Manual COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCB INSTRUCTION 5100.1, Navy ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:299
Avg rating:5.0/5.0
Slides: 111
Provided by: seabees20
Learn more at: http://seabees202.com
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: SEABEE COMBAT WARFARE COMMON CORE 103 SAFETY 15 MARCH 200


1
SEABEE COMBAT WARFARECOMMON CORE 103 SAFETY
15 MARCH 2007
2
References
  • OPNAVINST 5100.23F NAVOSH Program Manual
  • COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCB INSTRUCTION 5100.1, Navy
    Construction safety Manual
  • Industrial/ Construction Standards 29CFR 1910/
    1926
  • NAVEDTRA 14026 Construction Electrician Basic

3
References
  • e. NAVEDTRA 14167, Naval Safety Supervisor
  • f. OPNAVINST 3500.39A, Operational Risk
    Management

4
Overview
  • Responsibilities of key personnel.
  • Safety Committees.
  • Mishap Investigation.
  • Eye Protection.
  • Hearing Protection.
  • Personal Protective Equipment.
  • Electrical Inspection and Certification.
  • Ground Fault Interruption.

5
Overview
  • Lockout / Tag-out Procedures
  • Confined Spaces
  • Respirators
  • Industrial Hygiene
  • Good Housekeeping
  • Classes of Fire
  • Safety Stand Down
  • Operational Risk Management

6
Responsibilities
  • PQS Question 103.1 Explain the responsibilities
    of the following personnel as they apply to
    safety
  • Commanding Officer
  • Executive Officer
  • Safety Officer
  • Dept Head/ Company Commander
  • Supervisor
  • Crew Leader

7
Responsibilities
  • g. Safety Petty Officer
  • h. All Hands
  • Reference (e) NAVEDTRA 14167 Naval Safety
  • Supervisor

8
CommandingOfficer
  • Responsible for the safety and health of all
    military and civilian personnel, the safe use and
    condition of equipment, and the protection of all
    government property.
  • Ensures compliance with established procedures
    and work practices.
  • Ensures OSH councils and committees are formed at
    appropriate command levels.
  • Ensures compliance with current instructions and
    regulations

9
CommandingOfficer
  • Ensures all work places receive a safety
    inspection at least annually.
  • Establishes a Hazard Abatement Program.
  • Establishes NAVOSH education and training
    programs.
  • Coordinates occupational health support with the
    cognizant Naval Hospital or Regional Medical
    Center.
  • Reviews and signs the Annual Safety Report.

10
ExecutiveOfficer
  • Chairman of the Occupational Safety and Health
    (OSH) Counsel.
  • Assumes the Commanding Officers responsibilities
    in his absence.
  • Enforces the Commanding Officers safety policies
    and procedures.

11
Safety Officer
  • Organizationally on the immediate staff of the
    Commanding Officer. A full time assignment.
  • Maintains complete and accurate records on the
    accident, injury, occupational illness rate of
    unit and submits annual mishap summaries to
    Brigade.
  • As required, prepares specific safety rules and
    regulations for approval by the C.O.
  • Instruction Verification.
  • Reviews and approves all project general and
    specific safety plans.

12
Safety Officer
  • Organizes and conducts safety inspections and
    surveys to identify violations, hazards, and
    deficiencies in operations, facilities, and
    equipment.
  • Records safety and health violations through an
    aggressive Hazard Abatement Program.
  • Coordinates actions and follows up on corrective
    measures taken.
  • Consults and maintains liaison with key personnel
    during various planning evaluations.

13
Safety Officer
  • Assists supervisors in developing and conducting
    safety training. Provides consultation services,
    advice, and guidance.
  • Submits minutes of OSH Policy and Safety
    Supervisor committee meetings to the Commanding
    Officer for review.
  • TRAINS, EDUCATES, TRACKS, INSPECTS, AND FOLLOWS
    UP.

14
Company/ Department Head Responsibilities
  • Department Heads / Company Commanders
  • -Responsible for safety within areas of
    responsibility, ENFORCE safety standards. Are
    assigned as members of the OSH Counsel.
  • -Ensures all safety regulations are complied
    with.
  • -Promotes and strengthens the safety program
    through all levels of supervision by establishing
    internal training procedures

15
Company/ Department Head Responsibilities
  • -Plans all work with regard to safety and the
    safety related equipment or materials needed.
  • -Supervises and monitors staff to ensure full
    compliance with all safety rules and regulations.
  • -Picks the right person for the job at hand and
    ensures they are trained.
  • -Reviews work procedures and takes positive
    action to correct all hazards.
  • - Ensures proper tracking of all training and
    the complete and thorough investigation of all
    mishaps with timely submissions

16
Supervisors
  • Responsible for the safety of their personnel,
    develop safety plans, enforce safety standards,
    ensure adequate PPE is available.
  • Be familiar with safety rules and regulations for
    jobs and facilities in youre your area.
  • Enforces safety rules and immediately corrects
    any unsafe act or noted deficiency.
  • Inspects jobs and work areas for hazards and
    unsafe work habits.
  • Educates and trains personnel, sets the example.
  • Reports all mishaps in a timely manner.

17
Supervisor
  • Investigates all mishaps, determines the basic
    causes, and takes corrective actions to prevent
    repetitive mishaps.
  • Insures PPE is available and properly being worn
    at all work sites.
  • Knows personnel limitations, assigns the right
    person to the task at hand.
  • Post appropriate signs and warnings.

18
Safety Chain of Command
  • Safety Supervisor Monitor safety within their
    Company, Department or Detail. Initiate
    preliminary mishap investigation within their
    area of responsibility.
  • Principle advisor to Company Commander,
    Department Head or Detail OIC.
  • Normally an E-6 or above, must have attended the
    Safety Managers Course.

19
Safety Chain of Command
  • Crew leaders and other supervisors are the key
    people in a successful and aggressive safety
    program. Responsibilities include but are not
    limited to
  • - Being familiar with safety and regulations.
  • - Enforcing safety rules and correcting unsafe
    acts.
  • - Educating and training personnel.
  • - Reporting all mishaps and near misses.
  • - Ensuring the correct personal protective
    equipment is being utilized.

20
Safety Chain of Command
  • All Hands Responsible for their own safety and
    the safety of their co-workers. Everyone should
    be aware of the hazards to which they are exposed
    and precautionary measures to prevent personal
    injury or property damage.
  • Reports to work well rested and emotionally
    prepared for the task at hand.
  • Understands and follows safety and health
    precautions pertinent to work areas
  • Reports to immediate supervisor and unsafe
    conditions or acts.

21
All Hands
  • Cautions those who may be endangered by
    suspected, known, unusual or developing hazards.
  • Reports any mishaps to your immediate supervisor.
  • Uses all PPE required to complete the task.

22
Council and Committees
  • PQS Question 103.2 Explain the functions of the
    following
  • a. Safety Council
  • b. Enlisted Safety Committee
  • c. Safety Petty Officer Committee
  • Reference (e) Ch 1, NAVEDTRA 14167, Naval Safety
    Supervisor

23
SafetyCommittees
  • OSH Council
  • OSH Committee

24
OSHCouncil
  • OSH Council Consist of the Executive Officer
    (Chairman), Safety Officer, S-1, S-3, S-4, S-7,
    Medical Officer, All Company Commanders and
    Detachment OICs.
  • Meets monthly while on deployment, and quarterly
    while in homeport.
  • Reviews the minutes of the OSH Committee, mishaps
    and mishap trends and recommend changes to safety
    policies to the Commanding Officer.

25
OSHCouncil
  • Reviews the minutes of the Safety committee
    meeting and directs appropriate action to ensure
    compliance with all instructions.
  • Keeps the Commanding Officer informed of
    problems and corrective actions taken.
  • Tracks mishap trends and looks ahead for possible
    areas of concern.

26
OSHCommittee
  • Safety Supervisors Committee (OSH Committee
    Consist of Safety Officer (Chairman), Safety
    Assistant, All Company Safety and HAZMAT
    Representatives.
  • Meets monthly or more often if deemed necessary.
  • Proposes safety policy or procedure
    recommendations to the OSH Council.
  • The committee reviews mishap trends and makes
    recommendations to the Counsel for policy changes.

27
OSHCommittee
  • Safety officer chairs the committee, members are
    appointed in writing by the Commanding Officer.
  • Held the first Monday of each month.
  • Each member is responsible for performing the
    following functions
  • Attends each month and more often if deemed
    necessary.
  • Participates in the exchange of information and
    follow on action request.

28
Mishap Investigation
  • PQS Question 103.3 Discuss the purpose of a
    mishap investigation and whos responsible for
    conducting the investigation.
  • Reference (e) NAVEDTRA 14167, Ch 4, Naval
    Safety Supervisor

29
Mishap Investigations
  • It is the Commanding Officer or Officer in
    Charges responsibility to conduct mishap
    investigations and report all reportable
    injuries, fatalities, and occupational illnesses
    occurring within their command or involving
    personnel attached to their command.

30
Mishap Definition
  • Mishap Any unplanned or unexpected event
    causing personnel injury, occupational illness,
    death, material loss or damage, or an explosion
    of any kind whether damage occurs or not.

31
Purpose of Mishap Investigation
  • Aimed at HOW and WHY an event occurred in order
    to identify corrective measures and prevent
    recurrence.
  • All mishaps are recorded

32
Mishap Categories
  • Class A - gt1,000,000 damage, fatality, or
    permanent total disability.
  • Class B - 200,000 - 1,000,000 damage, results
    in permanent partial disability, 3 or more people
    are hospitalized.
  • Class C - 20,000 - 200,000 damage, medical
    treatment beyond day/shift, reportable when
    gt5days lost.
  • Class D - lt20,000 damage, non-fatal injury, no
    first-aid needed

33
Eye Protection
  • PQS Question 103.4 State the different types of
    eye protection and when they are required.
  • Reference (e) Naval Safety Supervisor,
  • Ch 5

34
Sight ConservationProgram
  • All Navy activities that expose personnel to eye
    hazards shall have a sight conservation program
    with the following minimum
  • - Identification and evaluation of eye hazard.
  • - Prescription protective eye wear program.
  • - Procurement and maintenance of safety glasses.
  • - Training for employees.
  • - Effective program enforcement.

35
Sight ConservationProgram
  • Types of eye protection
  • - Goggles.
  • - Safety glasses.
  • - Face shields.
  • - Permanent walls.
  • - Temporary / movable shields.
  • Signs must be posted in all eye hazard areas.

36
Eye Protection And Uses
  • Safety Goggles Protect from flying particles
    and dust.
  • Chemical Goggles Protect from splashing
    liquids (acids, solvents, etc.)
  • Safety glasses Protect from flying particles
  • ( Impact, debris ).

37
Eye Protection And Uses
  • Welding glasses or goggles Protect from
    Ultraviolet radiation (arc flash).
  • Overspectacle glasses (planos) Protect from
    flying particles and impact worn over
    prescription glasses.
  • SAFETY EYE WEAR SHOULD BE WORN IN ANY OF THE
    ABOVE SITUATIONS.

38
Hearing Conservation
  • PQS Question 103.5 Discuss the hearing
    Conservation Program and when personnel are
    required to be enrolled.
  • Reference (a) Ch 18, OPNAVINST 5100.23F NAVOSH
    Program Manual

39
Hearing Conservation
  • Intended to prevent hearing loss related to
    exposure to high noise levels.
  • Noises greater than 84 dba and peak noises
    greater than 140 dba require single hearing
    protection. ( ear plugs or ear muffs ).
  • Continuous noises greater than 104 dba require
    double hearing protection. ( ear plugs and muffs
    ).

40
Hearing Conservation
  • Personnel are enrolled in the Hearing
    Conservation Program when they are exposed to
    noises greater than 84 dba for an 8 hour time
    weighted average based on a 40 hour work week.
  • Personnel enrolled in the program must have a
    baseline hearing test ( audio-gram ) and annual
    testing wile in the program.
  • When a person is removed from the program they
    must be tested for documentation of hearing
    capability.

41
Hearing Conservation
  • Goal is to prevent occupational hearing loss and
    ensure auditory fitness for duty in the military
    and civilian workforce.
  • Meeting the goal
  • -Noise Measure and analysis.
  • -Survey work environments.
  • -Engineering control.
  • -Reduction of noise at the source.
  • -Hearing protective devices.

42
Types of Hearing Protection
  • PQS Question 103.6 Explain the different types
    of hearing protection and when they are required.
  • Reference (a) Ch 18, OPNAVINST 5100.23F NAVOSH
    Program Manual

43
Types of Hearing Protection
  • Insert type Ear plugs.
  • Circumaural type Ear muffs.
  • - Required for continuous noise levels greater
    than 84 dba and peak noise levels greater than
    140 dba.
  • -Combination Ear plugs and ear muffs.
    Required for continuous noise levels greater
    than 104 dba.

44
Hearing Protection
45
PPE
  • PQS Question 106.7 Explain the maintenance and
    use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and
    why it is necessary.
  • Reference (a) Ch 20, OPNAVINST 5100.23F NAVOSH
    Program Manual

46
Maintenance and use of PPE
  • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) should be
    maintained in a condition that allows proper use
    of the equipment.
  • Scratched lenses, dirty, missing components, etc.
    can lessen the effectiveness of the equipment and
    deter usage.
  • When PPE is not used properly, people may be
    injured or property damaged.

47
Maintenance and use of PPE
  • Head Protection Protection from impact of
    falling and flying objects.
  • Foot Protection Protection of foot and toe from
    falling objects such as construction material
    handling.
  • Eye Protection Protection from flying particles
    or chips, and splashes from liquids.

48
Maintenance and use of PPE
  • Hand Protection
  • - To protect fingers and hand from sharp
    objects.
  • - Shock absorbing gloves for jack hammers.
  • Electrical Protection
  • - Rubber protective equipment for rated for
    certain voltages for electrical workers.
  • Long Sleeves
  • - To protect arms from flying debris or sparks.

49
Maintenance and use of PPE
  • Life Lines
  • - Protection from falling heights greater than 6
    feet.
  • Aprons
  • - Protection from splashes or sparks at mid
    section.
  • Respiratory Protection
  • - Protection from particles, fumes, mists, dusts
    and vapors.

50
Temporary Power
  • PQS Question 103.8 State the purpose of
    temporary power sources and explain source
    inspection and certification requirements.
  • Reference (b) Ch 24 COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCB
    INSTRUCTION 5100.1, Navy Construction Safety
    Manual

51
Temporary Electrical Power
  • Temporary electrical power is defined as any
    electric power source used for construction,
    renovation, contingency, or emergency operations.
    ( Any electric power source we use with hand
    tools and equipment is considered temporary
    power. )
  • All temporary electric power sources must be
    inspected and certified safe, inspections are to
    be conducted initially and updated bi-weekly.

52
Temporary Electrical Power
  • Types of temporary electrical power
  • - Generators, 5kw has to be grounded unless
    stated as double insulated otherwise on the
    generator.
  • - Resistance level must be below 25 ohms to
    ground for normal set-up, 15 ohms in hazardous
    atmospheres and 5 ohms in explosive atmospheres.
  • - Existing power, checked for proper grounding.
  • - Existing power pole, run through a distribution
    box to reduce current. Must also be grounded.

53
Temporary Electrical Power
  • All temporary electrical power sources shall only
    be permitted during emergencies, periods of
    construction, remodeling, repair to or demolition
    of structures or similar activities.
  • All temporary sources shall be inspected,
    certified safe and tagged with the inspectors
    name, company and date prior to the first use.
  • All sources shall be re-inspected every 14 days
    after initial inspection and certified safe for
    continued use on the attached tag.

54
Temporary Electrical Power
  • The inspection of temporary power sources shall
    also be kept in a log. This log will contain the
    same information as the tag, plus it will also
    contain the exact location of the tags.
  • All sources shall be re-inspected every 14 days
    after initial inspection and certified safe for
    continued use on the attached tag.
  • The primary purpose of the inspection is to
    ensure that proper grounding is established and
    that this source can be utilized without
    endangering the worker.

55
Temporary Electrical Power
  • Temporary electric power inspections.
  • Temporary power sources are inspected to ensure
  • - proper voltage.
  • - proper polarity.
  • - adequate ground.
  • All generators must be grounded to earth with a
    maximum of 25 ohms resistance or comply with the
    National Electric Code when 25 ohms or less can
    not be achieved.

56
Ground FaultProtection
  • PQS Question 103.9 Explain when Ground Fault
    Circuit Interruption (GFCI)
  • protection is required.
  • Reference (c) Ch b, Industrial/ Construction
    Standards 29CFR 1910/ 1926

57
Ground FaultProtection
  • Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs) are
    required to be used with all electric hand tools
    (drills, saws, concrete vibrators, etc. ).
  • GFCIs detect a change in the flow of electricity
    and interrupt the circuit before any harm can be
    done to personnel. GFCIs must trip at less than
    .5 milliampres.
  • GFCIs must be tested monthly to ensure proper
    function.

58
Ground FaultCircuit Interrupters
  • All 120 volt, single phase 15 and 20 ampere
    receptacle outlets on construction sites or shops
    shall have an approved class A, group I, GFCI
    unit with a trip level between .3 and .5
    mili-amperes.
  • Receptacles on two wire, single phase portable or
    vehicle mounted generators, rated not more than
    5KW, where the circuit conductors of the
    generator are insulated from the generator frame
    and all other grounding surfaces do not require
    GFCI protection.

59
Ground FaultCircuit Interrupters
  • The CTR electrician shall ensure that all GFCIs
    function correctly, are in good repair and
    maintains a GFCI inspection log.
  • No repairs to GFCIs are authorized.
  • GFCIs that are damaged or fail to function
    correctly will be returned to the manufacturer
    for repair and or replacement.

60
Electrical and PowerEquipment Inspection
  • PQS Question 103.10 Explain the electrical and
    power equipment inspection requirements.
  • Reference (b) Ch 24 COMSECONDNCB/COMTHIRDNCB
    INSTRUCTION 5100.1, Navy Construction safety
    Manual

61
Electrical and PowerEquipment Inspection
  • All tools (electrical, power, hand, etc.) will
    be inspected daily by the operator prior to use.
    This includes PPE, extension cords, air hoses,
    hydraulic components etc
  • Any tool or equipment found defective or damaged
    must be removed from service until repaired or
    replaced.

62
Electrical and PowerEquipment Inspection
  • Powder actuated tools must be inspected monthly
    by a qualified technician with inspection
    documented and records maintained.
  • The following test shall be performed on cord
    sets, receptacles not part of the permanent
    wiring of a building or structure, and cord and
    plug connected equipment required to be grounded

63
ElectricalInspection
  • - All equipment grounding conductors shall be
    tested for continuity and shall be electrically
    continuous.
  • -Each receptacle and attachment cap or plug
    shall be tested for correct attachment of the
    equipment grounding conductor. The equipment
    grounding conductors shall be connected to its
    proper terminal.

64
ElectricalInspection
  • Required times of inspection
  • - Before the first use.
  • -Before any equipment is returned to service
    after any repair.
  • -Before equipment is used after any incident
    which can be reasonably suspected to have caused
    damage.
  • -At intervals not to exceed one month.

65
Lockout / Tag-out
  • PQS QUESTION 103.11 Discuss when lockout/
    tag-out procedures are required.
  • Reference (a) Ch 24 OPNAVINST 5100.23F NAVOSH
    Program Manual

66
Lockout / Tag-out
  • All potential energy sources must be secured
    prior to working on equipment and machinery.
  • Required when you will be working on any item
    that will store energy as
  • - Electrical Equipment
  • - Hydraulic
  • - Steam
  • - Pneumatic

67
Lockout / Tag-out
  • Locks and tags are installed to prevent
    accidental activation of the equipment or
    energizing the power source while work is being
    performed.
  • Damaged or unsafe equipment or machinery should
    be locked or tagged out of service to prevent use
    until repairs are made.
  • Only qualified personnel are authorized to
    perform lockout/tag-out.

68
Lockout Devices
69
Lockout DeviceTag
70
Red Tag
71
Confined Spaces
  • PQS Question 103.12 Define confined space
    discuss the hazards associated with it.
  • Reference (a) Ch 27 OPNAVINST 5100.23F NAVOSH
    Program Manual

72
Confined Spaces
  • Confined Spaces are spaces with
  • - Limited or restricted means for entry or exit
    (tanks, manholes, storage bins, vaults)
  • - Not designed for continuous employee occupancy.
  • - Poor to no ventilation.
  • - Potential to contain harmful gases or vapors.
  • - Atmospheric oxygen concentration shall not be
    below 19.5 or above 22.

73
Confined Spaces
  • Hazards
  • - Oxygen deficiency below 19.5.
  • - Toxic gases or materials.
  • - Flammable gases or materials.
  • Confined Space Program Manager
  • - Only person who can certify a confined space
    entrance.
  • - List PPE required to enter a confined space.
  • - Lists the types of hazards.
  • - Constantly monitors work space during job.

74
Confined Spaces
  • PQS Question 103.13 Explain who is authorized to
    certify a confined space as safe for entry/ work.
  • Reference (a) Ch 27 OPNAVINST 5100.23F NAVOSH
    Program Manual

75
Confined Spaces
  • Only Gas Free Engineers are authorized to
    certify a confined space for entry.
  • Once all personnel exit the space for any
    duration, the space must be re-certified.
  • All confined spaces with potential hazards
    require a permit for entry.

76
Respirators
  • PQS Question 103.14 Discuss the three basic types
    of respirators and explain their use, care, and
    selection.
  • Reference (a) Ch 15 OPNAVINST 5100.23F NAVOSH
    Program Manual

77
Respirators
  • Air Purifying Respirator
  • - Removes contaminates by filtration, adsorption,
    absorption, or chemical reaction with
    contaminates. Used only where there is adequate
    oxygen (19.5-22)
  • Supplied-Air Respirator
  • - Provides breathing air independent of
    environment. Supplied air must meet Grade D
    purity requirements.
  • Self Contained Breathing Apparatus
  • - Offers complete independence from fixed sources
    of air and offers greatest degree of protection.

78
Respirator Requirements
  • Medical Screening
  • Personnel must be medically screened and approved
    by a medical professional (medical surveillance
    program).
  • Training
  • Properly trained on the use, storage, cleaning
    and limitations of respirators.
  • Fit Testing
  • Receive qualitative or quantitative fit test on
    the respirator to be used. The individual can
    only wear the type/size that he/she has been fit
    tested in.

79
Respirators
  • Replacement Criteria
  • - Replace filter after eight hours of use.
  • Selection
  • - Type of hazards you will be exposed to.
  • - Permissible Exposure Limit as set by OSHA.
  • - Threshold Limit Value as set by the American
    Council of Government Industrial Hygienist
    (ACGIH).
  • - MSDS requirements.
  • - NIOSH Chemical Guide handbook.
  • - Industrial Hygienist department recommendations.

80
Air - PurifyingRespirator
81
Supplied AirRespirator
82
SCBASelf Contained Breathing Apparatus
83
Industrial Hygiene
  • PQS Question 103.15 Discuss the importance of
    the Industrial Hygiene and Work Place Monitoring
    Program.
  • Reference (a) Ch 8, OPNAVINST 5100.23F NAVOSH
    Program Manual

84
Industrial Hygiene
  • Industrial Hygiene (IH) personnel recognize,
    evaluate and make recommendations to control
    potential workplace hazards.
  • Conducted and re-evaluated annually to determine
    any changes or when new equipment or processes
    are introduced.
  • Establish and document historical records of
    exposure levels for Navy personnel.
  • Ensure and demonstrate compliance with NAVOSH
    exposure criteria.

85
Industrial Hygiene
  • IH performs workplace monitoring and provides
  • - Descriptions of the operations, tasks and work
    practices which take place in each workplace.
  • - List of hazardous materials used in each work
    place.
  • - Lists of the physical hazards, noise hazards,
    and sources of non-ionizing radiation.
  • - Recommends engineering controls, administrative
    controls and / or PPE required in each shop.

86
Unsafe / Unhealthful Working Condition
  • PQS Question 103.16 Discuss the basic reporting
    procedures when an unsafe/ unhealthful working
    condition is submitted.
  • Reference (a) Ch 10, OPNAVINST 5100.23F NAVOSH
    Program Manual

87
Unsafe / Unhealthful Working Condition
  • Report to Chain of Command.
  • If Chain of Command does not resolve the problem
    report to the Safety Office.
  • If you desire not to verbally report to the
    Safety Office, you may submit a Report of Unsafe
    / Unhealthful Working Conditions OPNAV 5100/11.

88
Unsafe / Unhealthful Working Condition
  • Once the Safety Office receives the report
  • -Alleged imminent danger situations will be
    investigated within 24 hours.
  • -Potentially serious situations will be
    investigated within 72 hours.
  • -Health hazards are referred to Medical.
  • -The Safety Officer will reply in writing to
    the person submitting the report within 10
    working days.

89
Unsafe / UnhealthfulWorking Condition
  • Investigation time limits
  • - 24 hours on alleged imminent danger situations.
  • - 3 days for potentially serious situations.
  • - Health hazards are referred to Medical.
  • Response
  • - 10 working days to originator in writing.
  • - List what is being done.

90
Housekeeping
  • Good housekeeping is necessary to prevent
    mishaps ranging from tripping, falling, fires,
    imperilment, etc.
  • Safety compliance is about attitudes, if the work
    center is sloppy, the attitude reflected is
    sloppy and work and carelessness is acceptable.

91
Housekeeping
  • Good housekeeping
  • - Prevents health problems.
  • - Keeps rodents and bugs down.
  • - Prevents tripping hazards.
  • - Removes puncture hazards.
  • - Eliminates flying debris or missile hazards.
  • - Discourages pilferage of project materials and
    tools.

92
Electrical DistributionSystem Grounding
  • PQS Question 103.17 Explain the importance of
    properly grounding portable electrical power and
    distribution system.
  • Reference (d) Ch 3, NAVEDTRA 14026 Construction
    Electrician Basic

93
Electrical DistributionSystem Grounding
  • Electrical distribution systems require
    grounding to provide over current protection to
    the equipment, should the equipment be struck by
    lightning the grounding method provides a path to
    ground for the energy instead of through the
    distribution system.
  • All electrical distribution grounding system
    grounds must read less than 25 ohms to ground
    resistance or be in accordance with the National
    Electric Code.

94
Grounding PortableElectrical Distribution
  • Protects human life by providing the least path
    of resistance to the ground for electrical
    current.
  • Protects equipment from damage due to prolonged
    over current conditions.
  • Protects the electrical distribution systems
    from sustaining severe damage.

95
Types of Fire
  • PQS Question 103.18 Discuss the four general
    classes of fires and what types of extinguishers
    are used on each.
  • Reference (e), Ch 18, NAVEDTRA 14167, Naval
    Safety Supervisor

96
Types of Fire
  • Class A
  • - Fires in ordinary combustible materials such
    as wood, cloth, paper, rubber and many plastics.
  • - Use water, antifreeze, soda-acid, foam, aqueous
    film forming foam (AFFF), loaded stream,
    multipurpose dry chemical and CO2 type fire
    extinguishers.

97
Types of Fire
  • Class B
  • - Fires in flammable liquids, oils, greases,
    tars, oil base paints, lacquers and flammable
    gases.
  • - Use Halon, CO2, dry chemical, foam and aqueous
    film forming foam type fire extinguishers.

98
Types of Fire
  • Class C
  • - Fires which involve energized electrical
    equipment where the electrical non-conductivity
    of the extinguishing media is of importance.
  • - Use dry chemical type extinguishers.

99
Types of Fire
  • Class D
  • - Fires in combustible metals such as magnesium,
    titanium, zirconium, sodium, lithium and
    potassium.
  • - Use the fire extinguisher approved for each
    specific combustible metal hazard.

100
Safety Stand-Down
  • PQS Question 103.19 Discuss the purpose of
    safety stand-downs.
  • Reference (e) Ch 1, NAVEDTRA 14167, Naval Safety
    Supervisor

101
Safety Stand-Down
  • Safety Stand - Downs are to provide specific
    safety information and training for specific
    hazards, evolutions, and activities.
  • A stand down may be called any time the command
    notes a particular safety problem or wants to
    reemphasize safety on a specific topic.
  • Usually held before known potentially dangerous
    times such as holiday seasons or prior to
    exercises.
  • Additionally, they are scheduled after
    catastrophic mishaps, to prevent similar mishaps.

102
Safety Stand-Down
  • Provides a forum to release specific safety
    information or guidance to a large audience.
  • Used to focus personnel on specific hazards of
    their jobs and work stations.
  • Re-enforces safety as the number one priority
    required on the performance of their jobs.
  • Provides time for personnel to reflect on past
    and current work safety practices and standards.

103
ORM
  • PQS Question 103.20 Discuss the concept of ORM.
  • Reference (f) OPNAVINST 3500.39A, Operational
    Risk Management

104
ORM
  • Operational Risk Management
  • - The purpose of ORM is to enhance hazard
    identification in the operational environment in
    order to eliminate risks or reduce them to an
    acceptable level. ORM follows a five step
    sequence, with three levels of application.

105
ORM
  • PQS Question 103.21 Explain the following as
    they apply to ORM.
  • a. Identify hazards
  • b. Assessing hazards
  • c. Making risk decisions
  • d. Implementing controls
  • e. Supervising
  • Reference (f) OPNAVINST 3500.39A, Operational
    Risk Management

106
ORM
  • Identify Hazards
  • - Viewing mission / task instructions, recon,
    experience of leaders and troops, Units SOP,
    Units accident history. The objective is to
    identify all risks and hazards that are most
    likely to result in human losses, damage to
    equipment or mission degradation.

107
ORM
  • Assess Hazards
  • -Determine the risk of each hazard by applying
    the assessment matrix. The risk / hazards are
    identified as Low, Moderate, High, or Extremely
    High.

108
ORM
  • Make Risk Decisions
  • - For each hazard, develop one or more controls
    to eliminate or reduce the risk.
  • - Determine mission / task overall risk.
  • - Use procedures outlined in Units SOP. This
    risk level is the same as the hazard with the
    highest residual risk.

109
ORM
  • Implement Controls
  • -For each control, enter how the control will be
    put into effect and / or communicated to
    personnel who will make it happen.
  • -Examples Verbal orders, SOPs, OPORDs, or
    rehearsals.
  • -Engineering Controls, Administrative Controls,
    and Personal Protective Equipment.

110
ORM
  • Supervise and Evaluate
  • -Each control must be monitored to ensure it is
    implemented. Direct supervision, continuous
    supervision, spot checks, situation reports,
    inspection, buddy system, or personal self -
    discipline.
About PowerShow.com