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The Landscape of Continuing Education in The United

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Title: The Landscape of Continuing Education in The United


1
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church Research by Jenny
Phillips January, 2007 The General Board of
Higher Education and Ministry
2
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church
  • Survey reached out to
  • Persons responsible for continuing education in
    annual conferences
  • Directors of continuing education at seminaries
  • Directors of conference centers offering
    continuing education programs
  • Directors of camp and retreat centers
  • Other affiliates of the GBHEM

3
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church
  • Survey sent to approximately 100 continuing
    education contacts, plus camp and retreat centers
    across the country during the summer of 2006.

4
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church
  • Responses from
  • 52 persons in annual conference, central
    conference, academic and conference center
    settings
  • Includes one response from Estonia Central
    Conference and one from Central Conference of
    Central and Southern Europe
  • Includes responses from annual conferences around
    the United States, from California to Kansas to
    New York.
  • 11 persons in camp and retreat settings

5
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church
  • Common Themes
  • Affirmation of continuing education as a tool for
    enriching and growing ministry, but a vagueness
    as to how that transformation occurs
  • Concern with limited funding
  • Concern with increased competition among
    seminaries and other continuing education
    institutions

6
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church
  • Variations
  • Mixed perceptions about the value of single-time
    events
  • Multiple perspectives and many questions on how
    to better quantify continuing education goals,
    activities and outcomes
  • Camp/Retreat respondents generally perceived
    continuing education as faith formation events
    and/or retreats sponsored by the annual
    conferences and districts. They had limited
    information regarding continuing education
    standards and requirements.

7
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church FINANCES
  • Sources of Financial Support Within Annual
    Conferences
  • Three-quarters depend on Ministerial Education
    Fund
  • 40 of Annual Conferences offer funding
  • Nearly all supplement these sources with
    additional funding from congregations
  • A few find funds from other sources such as
    endowed funds and foundation grants

8
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church FINANCES
  • Sources of Financial Support for Academic
    Institutions and Conference Centers
  • Nearly all depend on program fees
  • 37 receive support from annual conferences
    and/or local churches
  • More than two-thirds receive support from
    foundations, grants, donors and endowment funds

9
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church FINANCES
  • Concerns Around Funding
  • Competition for scarce resources
  • Burden of personal funding often falls on clergy
    from small churches with small salaries
  • Costs of one-time events can be difficult to
    manage due to inconsistent participation
  • Longer-term, in-depth programs require greater
    funding

10
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church GOALS
  • Goals of Annual Conferences for Continuing
    Education Include
  • Increasing effectiveness
  • Spiritual formation
  • Deepen discipleship among laity and clergy
  • Nurturing leaders
  • Development of new skills
  • General growth
  • Clarity in preaching and mission
  • Vitality

11
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church GOALS
  • Goals of Academic Institutions and Conference
    Centers for Continuing Education Include
  • 90 said that a primary objective is to serve as
    a resource for clergy and the church
  • Other goals included
  • Income generation
  • Introducing potential donors to the institution
  • Furthering institutional objectives
  • Enhancing skills of clergy who were not trained
    in seminary
  • Resourcing lay leaders in various ministry
    settings

12
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church STANDARDS
  • Requirements for Continuing Education by Annual
    Conferences
  • The Book of Discipline para. 351.2 requires
    clergy to engage in continuing education for at
    least one week per year, one month during one
    year of every quadrennium, and and leaves and
    sabbaths as options every six years.
  • Over one third of annual conferences offer
    additional quantity definitions beyond those
    listed above.
  • Additional quantities included ranges of 2-4
    CEUs/year and the requirement that a certain
    number of CEUs be earned each quadrennium for
    study on specific topics, such as poverty,
    marginalization, and diversity.

13
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church STANDARDS
  • Annual Conference Standards of Quality and
    Accountability
  • 85 of annual conferences require clergy to
    report continuing education activity to their
    charge conferences and district superintendents
  • 25 require clergy to pursue continuing education
    in accordance with evaluations and goals set in
    conversation with pastor/parish relations
    committees and district superintendents
  • 50 require clergy to participate in programs
    that offer CEUs
  • 20 require clergy to show proof of participation
    or study other than CEUs
  • Three respondents noted inconsistent standards or
    no accountability

14
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church STANDARDS
  • Annual Conference Standards of Quality and
    Accountability
  • 57 of respondents said there were no significant
    repercussions to failing to engage in continuing
    education
  • 43 of respondents said that failure to
    participate in continuing education would be
    noted in reports to the district superintendent
    and/or the board of ordained ministry. In some
    conferences, this had possible implications for
    appointments.

15
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church STANDARDS
  • Annual Conference Standards of Quality and
    Accountability
  • Some annual conferences use tools for assessing
    and evaluating continuing education planning
    strategies, including The 360 Tool and The
    Gallup Strengths Finders Inventory.
  • Other annual conferences expressed a desire to
    develop tools to evaluate the effectiveness of
    continuing education and to provide standards
    that meet the needs of clergy and congregations.
  • Some annual conferences are developing new tools
    for measuring clergy effectiveness. Those tools
    include evaluating continuing education activity.

16
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church STANDARDS
  • Annual Conference Standards of Quality and
    Accountability
  • Example the Kentucky Annual Conference uses four
    basic core competencies, subdivided by measurable
    aspects of each competency, so that clergy can
    determine clear goals for continuing education.
    The core competencies are
  • Centering in Christ
  • Preaching/Teaching
  • Equipping
  • Leading
  • Each core competency has measurable aspects of
    clergy development - there are 17 aspects in all.

17
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church STANDARDS
  • Annual Conference Standards of Quality and
    Accountability
  • Example the Holston Conference requires clergy
    to report continuing education activity to charge
    conferences and district superintendents through
    its continuing education agency, The Wesley
    Leadership Institute.
  • Clergy must earn three CEUs per year.
  • All events offering CEUs must be approved by the
    Wesley Leadership Institute in order to qualify.
  • Clergy may earn up to one CEU per year through
    personal study and one CEU per year through
    online learning.
  • Clergy are encouraged to earn at least one CEU
    per year in a peer-learning context.
  • Clergy must annually complete an extensive online
    reporting form

18
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church STANDARDS
  • Annual Conference Standards of Quality and
    Accountability
  • Such models reveal efforts to better quantify
    clergy needs for continuing education, and assess
    how clergy are responding to their own individual
    growth areas.
  • These types of models were generally in
    development. Annual conference leaders say that
    there is a need for greater accountability in
    continuing education.
  • However, they are still trying to figure out how
    to overcome resistance to the imposition of more
    specific standards for continuing education
    beyond the Discipline requirements.

19
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church PROGRAMS
  • Annual Conference Relationships
  • 30 do not partner with other institutions to
    offer programming
  • Nearly 60 partner with seminaries to offer
    programming
  • 40 partner with conference/retreat centers to
    offer programming
  • 40 partner with other institutions to offer
    programming. Institutions include
  • General boards and agencies of The United
    Methodist Church, particularly the General Board
    of Discipleship
  • Annual conference agencies
  • The Alban Institute

20
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church PROGRAMS
  • Guidance to Annual Conferences Provided by Boards
    of Ordained Ministry
  • We have a Clergy Development Program where for
    pre-selected programs, the BOM will pay the
    entire cost, excluding travel. The clergy, SPRC,
    and DS must write and submit learning goals and
    desired outcomes for approval by a committee
    prior to receiving funds.
  • Continuing Education Guidelines describe
    requirements, encouraging diverse training and
    limiting credit online and for reading or
    videotape learning.
  • We have formerly used a plan in terms of a
    balanced profile. This year we will be using the
    360 tool for evaluation by self and key people
    with whom we work, as well as the DS. Both
    weaknesses and strengths will be a guide to where
    our growing edges are for formulating a plan for
    continuing formation.

21
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church PROGRAMS
  • Guidance to Annual Conferences Provided by Boards
    of Ordained Ministry
  • BOOM has resources for candidates for ministry
    -- on Elder track -- called RIM. Some special
    events are highlighted by BOOM and Orders
  • Part of our Lilly Grant for Pastoral Excellence,
    involves Peer Group Learning. Those covenants
    must be approved to get funding.
  • We have developed a catalog of CE opportunities
    offered in a diversity of places.
  • The bishop has a Tending our Lives Together
    retreat for all persons under appointment every
    two years. The BOM provides a preaching
    convocation every two years. Thus we offer CEU
    events every year for our clergy in Louisiana.
    Various groups within the conference also provide
    Continuing Education opportunities for clergy and
    laity.

22
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church PROGRAMS
  • Programs at Academic Institutions and Conference
    Centers for Lay People
  • Nearly three-quarters offer programs for lay
    people
  • Types of programs include
  • Hispanic leadership
  • Spirituality
  • Outdoor adventure
  • Arts
  • Peace and justice
  • Senior programs
  • Basic ministry studies
  • Music and worship
  • Bible
  • Leadership
  • Theology
  • Pastoral care
  • Preaching
  • Courses for United Methodist
  • Certification tracks

23
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church PROGRAMS
  • Lay People Required by Annual Conferences to
    Participate in Continuing Education
  • 7 Lay Leaders
  • 33 Christian Educators
  • 20 Music Leaders
  • 3 Worship Leaders
  • Certified Persons also must do continuing
    education

24
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church PROGRAMS
  • Factors for academic institutions and conference
    centers in determining course listings (ranked in
    order)
  • What clergy say they want
  • What institutional leaders think clergy need
    cost (tied)
  • What annual conference leaders say clergy need
  • What faculty are willing to teach

25
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church RACIAL/ETHNIC PROGRAM
CONSIDERATIONS
  • 68 of annual conferences provide continuing
    education related to racial/ethnic inclusiveness
    or multicultural learnings.
  • 55 of annual conferences encourage and support
    clergy to participate in national continuing
    education events for racial/ethnic clergy.

26
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church RACIAL/ETHNIC PROGRAM
CONSIDERATIONS
  • Marvin Morgan of the Interdenominational
    Theological Center in Atlanta, GA noted that
    African-American clergy approach continuing
    education through unique contexts. He said that
    in his experience, African-American clergy are
    more likely to attend an established conference
    such as The Hampton Ministers Conference,
    featuring both scholars and faith community
    leaders, rather than an event at an academic
    institution that simply features a scholar.

27
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church EFFECTIVE PROGRAMS
  • Annual Conferences
  • Holston Conference Leave Well, Start Fresh
    seminar that gives pastors and staff parish
    representatives a time to work through leaving
    issues and to help entering clergy and
    congregations start fresh by making plans for
    communicating and working together.
  • Louisiana Conference The Tending our Lives
    Together retreat every two years provides an
    opportunity for all persons under appointment to
    fellowship, hear great presenters (brought in
    from around the US), worship together, and meet
    in small groups to discuss various ministry needs
    and issues that need to be addressed in a caring,
    and trusting environment.

28
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church EFFECTIVE PROGRAMS
  • Annual Conferences
  • South Carolina Annual Conference The 2006
    Bishop's School of Ministry collaborated with
    Cokesbury's Worship Connection to offer a
    national level continuing education event focused
    on worship.
  • Rio Grande Conference Have worked closely with
    the Mexican American program for continuing
    education events.
  • New York Annual Conference Have worked several
    times with Alban Institute on programs aimed at
    helping clergy with specific programs.
  • Others include Annual Pastors School, Elders
    Orders gathering and Bishops Convocation

29
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church EFFECTIVE PROGRAMS
  • Academic Institutions and Conference Centers
  • Candler School of Theology Covenant Colleagues
    - a two-year colleague program for clergywomen in
    their first 10 years of ministry
  • Interdenominational Theological Center
    Certificate in Theology - program designed to
    enhance the level of theological competency among
    non-seminary-trained clergy and lay people.
    Videotaped lectures and seminary-trained local
    instructors are used to train students in
    satellite locations
  • Christian Theological Seminary The Indiana
    Clergy Peer Group Study Program delivers
    resources to congregations via the formation of
    self selecting peer groups that design their own
    three-year learning plans. The most important
    aspect of the project has been that the
    participants decide what to learn and the
    resources to use in learning it.

30
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church EFFECTIVE PROGRAMS
  • Academic Institutions and Conference Centers
    (cont.)
  • Wayne E. Oates Institute Online seminars
    featuring a peer group reflective learning
    approach
  • United Theological Seminary Integrated annual
    retreat-seminars for those who preach, including
    clergy as well as masters and occasional doctoral
    students. Expanding to worship arts/music
    constituencies as well as "return" participation.
    Focus on spiritual formation for leadership/daily
    worship framework, along with learning sessions
    in peer colleague groups with both residential
    and guest faculty presenters.

31
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church EFFECTIVE PROGRAMS
  • Academic Institutions and Conference Centers
    (cont.)
  • Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary The
    Doctor of Ministry is seen as Continuing
    Education for clergy in areas of preaching,
    evangelism and administration. it is in ongoing
    development in relationship to the area annual
    conferences to meet leadership needs. The Styberg
    Preaching Institute is also successful in that it
    brings excellent, nationally known preachers to
    conduct workshops for increasing effectiveness in
    sermon development and delivery.
  • Moxley and Associates LLC The Reynolds Program
    in Church Leadership is a year-long program that
    combines four workshop sessions, one-on-one work
    with an executive coach between sessions, work in
    peer learning communities between sessions, and
    individual application and study between
    sessions.

32
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church EFFECTIVE PROGRAMS
  • Academic Institutions and Conference Centers
    (cont.)
  • 60 of respondents to the question, What is your
    most interesting and effective program? named a
    program that involved peer group learning over an
    extended period of time.
  • Phone interviews revealed a real sense of mission
    and purpose for such programs that was less
    present in conversation around other types of
    programs.

33
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church EFFECTIVE PROGRAMS
  • Strong consensus among representatives of
    academic institutions, conference centers and
    annual conferences that long-term, peer-based
    learning programs are by far the most effective
    in helping clergy to learn new skills, work on
    weaknesses, be accountable, and receive
    much-needed vocational support.

34
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church PROGRAM CHALLENGES
  • Lack of consistency in standards means that many
    types of programs as well as personal pursuits
    are called continuing education.
  • Clergy in remote area have limited access to
    continuing education opportunities, and fewer
    resources to seek them out.
  • There is a sense of increased competition for
    continuing education resources. MEF funds are
    used for multiple purposes, and more
    organizations are competing for continuing
    education participants.

35
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church PROGRAM CHALLENGES
  • Programs that are perceived as theoretical can
    be less successful than programs that are
    perceived as practical. Many respondents say it
    is easier to draw participants to programming
    designed for immediate application.
  • One-time events can be expensive to produce and
    promote. It can be risky to put on events without
    a built-in audience.

36
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church PROGRAM TOPICS
  • Popular Topics According to Annual Conference
    Respondents
  • Congregational Development
  • Worship
  • Pastoral Care
  • Bible
  • Stewardship
  • Contemporary Worship
  • Youth Ministry
  • Evangelism
  • Spiritual Formation
  • Conflict Management
  • Counseling
  • Travel Seminars
  • Popular Topics According to Academic/CC
    Respondents
  • Congregational Development
  • Worship
  • Bible
  • Pastoral Care
  • Stewardship
  • Contemporary Worship
  • Spiritual Formation
  • Community Issues
  • Preaching
  • Church Administration
  • Self-Care
  • Leadership
  • Coaching
  • Theology

37
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church POPULAR BOOKS
  • Popular Books According to Annual Conference
    Respondents
  • Breaking the 200 Barrier
  • Companions in Christ Series
  • Purpose-Driven Life
  • Natural Church Development
  • The Emerging Church
  • Good to Great
  • Race to Reach Out
  • Gods Politics

38
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONAL
ISSUES
  • Issues for Continuing Educators in Academic
    Institutions
  • Competition for funding with other academic
    programs
  • Perception that continuing education is an income
    generator rather than resource, and is therefore
    expendable in times of budget shortfall
  • Faculty do not frame their work in terms that
    address the immediate needs of the church

39
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONAL
ISSUES
  • Issues for Continuing Educators in Academic
    Institutions
  • A continuing education coordinator may teach, but
    is not necessarily a member of the faculty -
    limited status.
  • Some administrators and faculty are beginning to
    see the value of and need for a strong continuing
    education program.
  • Two respondents said they felt strong engagement
    with and appreciation for continuing education by
    other members of the institution.
  • Some United Methodist Seminaries, including Drew,
    Candler and United, are making continuing
    education a higher priority.

40
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church CENTRAL CONFERENCE ISSUES
  • Responses from Patrick Streiff, Bishop of the
    Central Conference of Central and Southern Europe
    (CCCSE), and Thea Kant, Continuing Education
    Coordinator for the Estonian United Methodist
    Church (EUMC)
  • CCCSE requires minimum of 2-4 days/year for
    pastors retreats EUMC requires 2-3 academic
    credits/year
  • Goals for CCCSE include increasing knowledge on
    praxis issues, theology, social change, and basic
    theology for lay people
  • Both conferences offer continuing education
    through schools and seminaries and through the
    conference. CCCSE also works in ecumenical
    cooperation with other churches.

41
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church UNMET NEEDS FOR
CONTINUING EDUCATION
  • Unmet Needs According to Academic Institution
    Coordinators and Conference Center Directors
  • Additional funding and fundraisers so that
    program administrators can focus on the program
  • A course of study that builds on a curriculum and
    offers credit other than a D.Min.
  • Congregational support for clergy participation
    in continuing education
  • Life Coaching

42
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church UNMET NEEDS FOR
CONTINUING EDUCATION
  • Unmet Needs According to Academic Institution
    Coordinators and Conference Center Directors
    (cont.)
  • Tools for accountability
  • Better programs for key clergy transition points
    clergy formation after seminary, clergy moving
    into a new church, and clergy entering retirement
  • Organization and communication among continuing
    educators
  • Programs based in Wesleyan theology

43
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church UNMET NEEDS FOR
CONTINUING EDUCATION
  • Unmet Needs According to Annual Conferences
  • Support in helping clergy develop plans rather
    than simply fulfill requirements
  • Continuing education requirements for Lay Persons
    Assigned
  • Conflict-resolution programs
  • Interpersonal relationship programs

44
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church UNMET NEEDS FOR
CONTINUING EDUCATION
  • Unmet Needs According to Annual Conferences
    (cont.)
  • Mentoring and support group programs
  • Long-term training opportunities
  • Middle-leadership development
  • Additional funding
  • Free programs from United Methodist seminaries

45
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church EFFICACY OF CONTINUING
EDUCATION
  • Responses to Are available continuing education
    programs in The United Methodist Church
    effective?
  • 37 yes
  • 40 neutral
  • 9 no
  • 14 dont know

46
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church EFFICACY OF CONTINUING
EDUCATION
  • Responses to Do continuing education programs
    in The United Methodist Church respond to the
    needs of the church?
  • 26 yes
  • 47 neutral
  • 14 no
  • 14 dont know

47
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church EFFICACY OF CONTINUING
EDUCATION
  • Responses to Do continuing education programs
    in The United Methodist Church provide resources
    that help people fruitfully engage with the most
    challenging issues in the church?
  • 32 yes
  • 37 neutral
  • 24 no
  • 7 dont know

48
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
THE GBHEM
  • Desire for the GBHEM to Provide More Continuing
    Education Resources and Guidelines
  • 81 yes
  • 19 no
  • Visited the GBHEM Website
  • 85 yes
  • 15 no

49
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
THE GBHEM
  • Further Insights for the GBHEM
  • The paradigm of continuing education needs to
    shift from event-based offerings to longer-term
    covenantal group, peer-based learning in order to
    provide sustained, intentional growth in ministry
    opportunities Connecting conference and local
    church vision with intentional training is also a
    great need.

50
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
THE GBHEM
  • Further Insights for the GBHEM
  • Relevance, listening - these are most important.
    So often the events that are led by the general
    church boards and agencies are facilitated by
    people who are not serving in areas like the
    Northeast. We are a different culture - and
    leaders, facilitators from the South or Midwest
    simply dont recognize the challenges faced in a
    largely Roman Catholic or unchurched culture.

51
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
THE GBHEM
  • Further Insights for the GBHEM (cont.)
  • I think although some of the events offered by
    the larger denomination have been helpful,
    (School of Congregational Development has been
    consistently of value), many are weak compared to
    events offered by other organizations.

52
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
THE GBHEM
  • Further Insights for the GBHEM (cont.)
  • We need to push continuing education not only
    with our clergy but also with our churches. Both
    parties must buy in to the need in order for it
    to be effective.

53
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
THE GBHEM
  • Further Insights for the GBHEM (cont.)
  • There is little collaboration and conversation
    around continuing education for United Methodist
    clergy and laity. As a result, there is much
    redundancy, and competition for resources and
    participants.
  • The restricted funding available to make
    continuing education opportunities accessible and
    available to clergy and laity does not fund
    programs that meet the expressed needs of those
    constituencies.

54
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church CONTINUING EDUCATION AND
THE GBHEM
  • Further Insights for the GBHEM (cont.)
  • As a non-United Methodist, you appear to have
    better continuing education programs than most
    other denominations. I admire what you already do
    and your constant attempts to improve on that.

55
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION
  • Snapshots in Continuing Education
  • Further program details revealed through phone
    and in-person interviews conducted between
    September 2006 and January 2007.

56
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Annual Conferences
  • Rev. Don Neal, Executive Director, Office of
    Superannuate Homes and Ordained Ministry
  • North Alabama Annual Conference, Birmingham, AL
  • Clergy and local pastors are required to meet the
    Discipline standards for continuing education in
    the North Alabama Annual Conference, though there
    are no real repercussions for failing to
    participate in continuing education. Don says
    that they know the conference is in need of
    pastors, so failing to participate will have no
    real impact on their ability to get an
    appointment.
  • The conference does not provide funding for
    continuing education. All Ministerial Education
    Fund monies go to seminarians. However, it does
    give funds to the Institute for Clergy
    Excellence, an organization that provides
    structure for group-directed continuing
    education.
  • The Institute for Clergy Excellence (ICE), and
    its predecessor organization, the Methodist
    Education Leave Society (MELS), invite clergy to
    work in self-selected groups to develop study
    proposals and plans, then provides group
    facilitation and funding to execute their plans.

57
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Annual Conferences
  • Rev. Don Neal, Executive Director, Office of
    Superannuate Homes and Ordained Ministry
  • North Alabama Annual Conference, Birmingham, AL
  • (cont.)
  • The conference is considering a plan which will
    allow clergy who have been in an appointment for
    six or more years to take a four-week renewal
    leave. This could provide an opportunity for
    in-depth continuing education.
  • Don says it could be helpful for the GBHEM to
    provide guidelines for continuing education that
    will jumpstart annual conferences and help them
    see the possibilities for continuing education.
    They need models that can help conferences use
    continuing education standards in an
    uncomplicated way. They also need help teaching
    clergy that continuing education is a lifelong
    endeavor.

58
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Annual Conferences
  • Rev. Doug McKinney, Chair of Continuing Education
  • Rocky Mountain Annual Conference, Parker, CO
  • The Rocky Mountain Annual Conference goal for
    continuing education is to help clergy grow their
    minds, hearts and skill for ministry.
  • The conference is working to reestablish
    continuing education standards of accountability
    through a reporting form system. The forms will
    also be used to develop a spreadsheet that tracks
    the kinds of continuing education being used in
    the conference, as well as resources being used
    such as books, videos, music and websites.

59
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Annual Conferences
  • Rev. Doug McKinney, Chair of Continuing Education
  • Rocky Mountain Annual Conference, Parker, CO
  • (cont.)
  • The Board of Ordained Ministry provides stipends
    through the Ministerial Education Fund. The
    annual conference and local churches provide
    additional funding.
  • Doug believes that continuing education is the
    best way to be proactive in developing
    congregations, in keeping pastors/staff healthy
    and vital. He recommends more online
    opportunities, as well as a strong, central
    source for continuing education based on a
    cluster group model that helps pastors to get
    together to develop honest and open
    relationships, providing mutual support and
    accountability.

60
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Annual Conferences
  • Rev. Lucinda Holmes, Coordinator of the Kansas
    East Annual Conference Task Force on Continuing
    Education
  • Kansas East Annual Conference, Shawnee, KS
  • The Kansas East Annual Conference has developed a
    task force on continuing education at the
    recommendation of the conferences Revitalization
    Task Force. Members are working to develop
    standards for continuing education, to act as a
    coordinating body for continuing education
    resources, and to assess what has been done in
    the past and what might be done in the future for
    continuing education.
  • In the past, continuing education has been an
    every person for him/herself endeavor. The
    conference has not had a process in place for
    approving continuing education events, though
    lots of events are available in their area.
    Clergy are required to report continuing
    education work to their charge conferences and
    district superintendents. The conference funds
    continuing education through the Ministerial
    Education Fund and local church funding.

61
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Annual Conferences
  • Caryl Griffin, former Director, Wesley Leadership
    Institute
  • Holston Conference, Knoxville, TN
  • The Holston Conference requires clergy to report
    continuing education activity to charge
    conferences and district superintendents. They
    must earn three CEUs per year. All events
    offering CEUs must be approved by the
    conferences Wesley Leadership Institute in order
    to qualify. Clergy may earn up to one CEU per
    year through personal study and one CEU per year
    through online learning. Clergy are encouraged to
    earn at least one CEU per year in a peer-learning
    context. Clergy must complete an extensive online
    reporting form annually.

62
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Annual Conferences
  • Caryl Griffin, former Director, Wesley Leadership
    Institute
  • Holston Conference, Knoxville, TN
  • (cont.)
  • The cabinet utilizes a master worksheet in
    making appointments. CEUs are listed on this
    sheet, and could influence appointment decisions.
  • The Wesley Leadership Institute is working to
    develop small group learning and leadership
    development opportunities across the conference.
    They are seeking to measure fruitfulness in
    ministry as a result of conference continuing
    education opportunities, and they encourage
    events that facilitate congregations living into
    the vision of the Holston conference for disciple
    formation.

63
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Annual Conferences
  • Thomas Smith, Director of Ministerial Services
  • Kentucky Annual Conference, Crestwood, KY
  • Continuing education in the Kentucky Annual
    Conference is funded through Board of Ordained
    Ministry stipends through the Ministerial
    Education Fund, additional annual conference
    funding, local church funding, and endowed
    scholarship funds.
  • The Kentucky AC requires clergy to earn four CEUs
    (40 contact hours of continuing education) per
    year. Clergy must report continuing education
    activity to their charge conferences and district
    superintendents. Each clergy person must also
    develop a continuing education plan each year
    that demonstrates it has been influenced by
    evaluations with the Pastor/Staff Parish
    Relations Committee, the ministry setting, and
    the district superintendent. Starting in 2007,
    failure to complete required CEUs could result in
    complaints of unwillingness or ineffectiveness.

64
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Annual Conferences
  • Thomas Smith, Director of Ministerial Services
  • Kentucky Annual Conference, Crestwood, KY
  • (cont.)
  • The conference offers a catalog of continuing
    education opportunities at institutions including
    seminaries, United Methodist colleges, and camp
    and retreat centers.
  • The Kentucky Board of Ordained Ministry has
    deemed four core competencies vital to effective
    clergy, which are further broken out into 17
    dimensions. All continuing education activities
    must address at least one of the dimensions of
    competency.

65
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Annual Conferences
  • Jerry Schronce, District Continuing Education
    Coordinator
  • Rockingham District, North Carolina Annual
    Conference
  • The Rockingham District of the North Carolina
    Annual Conference partners with Duke to develop
    an annual continuing education event. Jerry polls
    clergy and leaders to assess needs and wants. He
    takes ideas to Duke, and Duke executes them.
    Participants and their spouses pay 75 for a
    three-day gathering, and Dukes endowment pays
    for the remainder of the expenses.
  • Clergy required to earn 1 CEU/year, tracked by
    District Superintendent.
  • Jerry says that between one-third and one-half of
    clergy in his district see continuing education
    as a burden the rest see it as an opportunity.

66
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Elizabeth Luton, Director, Office of Church
    Ministries Education
  • Candler School of Theology, Atlanta, GA
  • Candler seeks to serve as a resource for the
    church through continuing education. The program
    is funded half through program fees and half
    through grant or foundation support. 10 of the
    programs are structured for self-directed study,
    40 for colleague groups, and half for
    leader-directed study.
  • Candler provides continuing education for lay
    people through the Bill Mallard Lay Theology
    Institute, a program which offers six-week
    courses and weekend seminars for lay people.
    Candler faculty and local professionals in the
    Atlanta area teach, and Candler and Atlanta-area
    churches host the classes. The goal is to provide
    theological study to people regardless of their
    religious or academic background. It is geared
    toward people seeking a deeper understanding of
    their faith and the faith of the ecumenical
    community.

67
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Elizabeth Luton, Director, Office of Church
    Ministries Education
  • Candler School of Theology, Atlanta, GA
  • (cont.)
  • The seminary offers several programs for clergy.
    Covenant Colleagues is an ecumenical program for
    clergywomen in their first 10 years of ministry
    focused on active learning, theological
    reflection, relational issues, spiritual
    formation, and peer group learning and support.
  • Another program is the Pilgrimage to the Holy
    Land for Pastoral Renewal and Spiritual
    Formation. Clergy participants gather for a week
    of learning and reflection with faculty, travel
    to the Holy Land together, and then meet again
    six months later for further study, as well as
    reflection on how they have and will integrate
    the experience into their ministries. Pilgrims
    participate in small groups for reflection and
    support before, during and after the journey.
    Groups are ecumenical.

68
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Elizabeth Luton, Director, Office of Church
    Ministries Education
  • Candler School of Theology, Atlanta, GA
  • (cont.)
  • Candler also offers a variety of one-time events,
    Course of Study School for Local Pastors, the
    National Institute in Church Finance and
    Administration, the Professional Association of
    United Methodist Church Secretaries Institute,
    and an auditing program.
  • Elizabeth notes that it is important for
    institutions offering continuing education to
    stop competing with one another they should work
    to define their own niches rather than struggling
    to compete against other local organizations.

69
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Bruce Roberts, Director of Indiana Clergy Peer
    Group Study Program and Professor of
    Congregational Education and Leadership
  • Christian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis, IN
  • The purpose of the Indiana Clergy Peer Group
    Study Program (PGSP) is to provide leadership
    consultation and to furnish resources for local
    congregations through the formation of clergy
    peer groups that focus on leadership in ministry.
    Groups involve eight persons meeting over three
    years giving primary attention to leadership in
    congregational life. The range of topics selected
    for study, reflection and action are broad in
    scope. Participants determine their own learning
    goals and strategies for meeting those goals.
    Group facilitators help clergy explore and refine
    their goals and learning programs.

70
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Bruce Roberts, Director of Indiana Clergy Peer
    Group Study Program and Professor of
    Congregational Education and Leadership
  • Christian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis, IN
  • (cont.)
  • Reflections and learnings
  • ? Trusting clergy to develop their own learning
    goals is difficult, but it is also extremely
    important because it energizes and provides a
    sense of ownership.
  • ? The peer-group process is key to helping clergy
    feel supported and fulfilled in ministry.
  • ? The facilitator in the peer group played a key
    role in modeling conflict-resolution and
    examining group dynamics.
  • ? When participants identify learning directions,
    plan learning activities, and sustain work and
    evaluation over time, they develop valuable
    leadership competencies.
  • ? Congregations can see the difference in their
    clergy. A clergy person who participates in the
    program is more motivated, creative and happy,
    and congregants report this making a positive
    impact on the life of the church.

71
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Bruce Roberts, Director of Indiana Clergy Peer
    Group Study Program and Professor of
    Congregational Education and Leadership
  • Christian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis, IN
  • (cont.)
  • This program is expensive each group receives
    about 10,000. Costs include not only fees and
    expenses related to the learning projects, but
    also administration of the program and training
    and providing stipends for facilitators. A next
    step in research is to look at how much (or
    little) money it would take to create a program
    with similar results to this one.

72
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Nathan Kirkpatrick, Director of Continuing
    Education Programs
  • Duke Divinity School, Durham, NC
  • Dukes programs are funded 40 by program fees
    and 60 by grants. Programs are determined
    primarily by what institutional leaders think
    clergy need.
  • Effective programs include
  • ? Courage to Serve an 18-month retreat-based
    program for rural church pastors
  • ? Study Leave for Ministry Professionals a
    program of self-directed study
  • ? Laity Weekend an annual event featuring a
    plenary lecture and multiple class opportunities
  • ? Lay Academy of Religion offers eight topical
    classes each year that meet for four two-hour
    sessions over three to four consecutive weeks.

73
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Nathan Kirkpatrick, Director of Continuing
    Education Programs
  • Duke Divinity School, Durham, NC
  • (cont.)
  • Partnering relationships with
  • ? Parish Ministry Board of North Carolina
    conference
  • ? Pastors School for North Carolina and Western
    North Carolina conferences
  • ? Various North Carolina districts
  • ? Various other conferences

74
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Nathan Kirkpatrick, Director of Continuing
    Education Programs
  • Duke Divinity School, Durham, NC
  • (cont.)
  • Duke emphasizes programs that place clergy into
    long-term peer groups where participants offer
    accountability, point out God for one another,
    and provide companionship that is affirming and
    equipping. Leaders believe continuing education
    functions not only as a source for intellectual
    growth, but also as an antidote to burnout.
    Leaders affirm the validity of both one-time and
    long-term programs because they meet the needs of
    different people in different places, reminding
    people to think theologically.
  • Challenge figure out the distinctiveness of the
    institution in the face of increasing competition
    in a market saturated with continuing education
    providers. There are 16 seminaries within 100
    miles of Duke.

75
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Rev. Larry Ousley, Director of the Intentional
    Growth Center
  • Intentional Growth Center, Lake Junaluska, NC
  • The Intentional Growth Center is an independent
    center for continuing education, serving as a
    resource for the Southeast Jurisdiction of The
    United Methodist Church, as well as clergy and
    lay people across the country and
    internationally. The mission of the Intentional
    Growth Center is to transform leaders for shared
    Christ-centered ministry.
  • Funding comes primarily through program fees,
    with limited additional support from grants, an
    endowment fund, and from the Southeast
    Jurisdiction. Balancing the budget is challenging
    because covering the costs of events and the
    infrastructure to support the center requires
    high program fees and/or high levels of
    participation. Two highly successful programs
    interim pastor training and youth confirmation
    provide resources to help subsidize less
    lucrative programs and new innovations.
    Elderhostel programming also provides a steady
    source of revenue. Overall, there has been a
    decrease in participation for stand-alone events.

76
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Rev. Larry Ousley, Director of the Intentional
    Growth Center
  • Intentional Growth Center, Lake Junaluska, NC
  • (cont.)
  • The center emphasizes the personal development of
    clergy and laity through coaching. According to
    Larry, coaches work with an individual, group, or
    organization to
  • 1. Clarify their purpose/passion/calling based in
    their core values
  • 2. focus on what is really important for them
  • 3. discover and create more ease and flow in
    their life
  • 4. and ultimately move into a state of grace.

77
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Rev. Larry Ousley, Director of the Intentional
    Growth Center
  • Intentional Growth Center, Lake Junaluska, NC
  • (cont.)
  • In addition to coaching programs, IGC offers
    programming in
  • ? Biblical Studies
  • ? Church Leadership
  • ? Spiritual Growth
  • ? Confirmation Retreats
  • ? Older Adult Ministries
  • ? Interim Ministry Training

78
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Marvin Morgan, Director of Continuing Education
    and Certification Programs
  • The Interdenominational Theological Center,
    Atlanta, GA
  • The Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC)
    seeks to enhance the professional skills of both
    non-seminary trained clergy and seminary-trained
    clergy.
  • ITC runs a Certificate in Theology Program. It is
    comprised of satellite teaching locations in
    rural areas that use a combination of
    seminary-trained local instructors and videotaped
    lectures by professors. Bishops in the CME church
    have adopted this program as an alternative to
    seminary. The program was originally funded by a
    grant from the Pew Foundation, but the grant ran
    out, and now the program relies fully on program
    fees. There is concern that they have educated so
    many of the people in the area who needed it,
    that the market has been saturated. ITC has
    issued 2000 Certificates in Theology.

79
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Marvin Morgan, Director of Continuing Education
    and Certification Programs
  • The Interdenominational Theological Center,
    Atlanta, GA
  • (cont.)
  • Within the institution, faculty have a positive
    perception of continuing education, in part
    because it is an additional source of work and
    income for them. Administrators see continuing
    education as an income producer that is
    expendable. There is little sense of the need to
    provide continuing education as a service to the
    community.

80
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Elise Eslinger, Director of the Institute for
    Applied Theology
  • United Theological Seminary, Trotwood, OH
  • United has developed a unified curriculum plan
    that places equal emphasis on masters degree
    programs, the Doctor of Ministry program, and
    non-degree programs/continuing education. The
    Institute for Applied Theology is building a
    program called Roots and Wings. It is grounded in
    tradition while also meeting the needs of the
    emerging church.
  • ? Roots ground participants in strong
    scholarship in traditional areas of Bible,
    theology, history and polity.
  • ? Wings help participants explore and
    experience contemporary trends in worship,
    ministry, and the life of faith, from new worship
    styles to emerging church management strategies.

81
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Elise Eslinger, Director of the Institute for
    Applied Theology
  • United Theological Seminary, Trotwood, OH
  • (cont.)
  • Institute programs seek to complement and enhance
    the seminary's masters and doctoral programs by
    offering courses, workshops, and special events
    open to students, clergy and lay ministers, and
    the community. Special areas of interest include
    urban ministry, rural and town country
    ministry, district superintendent training, and
    new media.
  • The institute has three centers The Center for
    Urban Ministry, The Heinrich Center for Wellness
    Ministry and Education, and The Center for
    Worship, Preaching and the Arts.

82
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Lovett Weems, Executive Director and Ann Michel,
    Associate Director of the Lewis Center for Church
    Leadership
  • Wesley Theological Seminary, Washington, D.C.
  • The leaders of the Lewis Center for Church
    Leadership dont see the center as a continuing
    education provider, and they say Wesley doesnt
    have a centralized continuing education program
    or director.
  • Lovett and Ann recently conducted a landmark
    study on clergy age trends in The United
    Methodist Church indicating that there has been a
    dramatic drop in the number and percentage of
    United Methodist elders in the last twenty years.

83
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Lovett Weems, Executive Director and Ann Michel,
    Associate Director of the Lewis Center for Church
    Leadership
  • Wesley Theological Seminary, Washington, D.C.
  • (cont.)
  • The center also worked with Saint Paul School of
    Theology to conduct a study of the probationary
    process in The United Methodist Church titled
    The Journey from Readiness to Effectiveness.
    Some of the survey questions to probationers
    centered around continuing education
  • How often did you participate in continuing
    theological education?
  • ? Once a week 9.9
  • ? Every other week 1.3
  • ? Once a month 8.6
  • ? Every other month 9.9
  • ? Quarterly 31.3
  • ? Less often 39.1

84
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Lovett Weems, Executive Director and Ann Michel,
    Associate Director of the Lewis Center for Church
    Leadership
  • Wesley Theological Seminary, Washington, D.C.
  • (cont.)
  • The time spent in continuing education was
  • ? Too much 5.1
  • ? Too little 16.1
  • ? About right 78.9
  • There are also questions around who decided for
    probationers what continuing education topics
    should be covered, who sponsored continuing
    education for probationers, and who paid for
    continuing education. The report on the survey is
    available at the Lewis Center website,
    www.churchleadership.com.

85
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Tim Dolan, Assistant Director for the Institute
    of Lay and Clergy Leadership
  • Weyerhaeuser Center for Christian Faith and
    Learning, Whitworth College, Spokane, WA
  • Tim did his dissertation on clergy cluster
    groups.
  • ? Three clusters of 6-12 clergy in a group
  • ? Pastors and lay pastors
  • ? Interdenominational
  • ? Groups met eight times over 3-4 months
  • ? Used an organizational leadership curriculum
    that covered congregational culture,
    congregations as a system, and change
  • ? Had various presenters
  • ? Prayed, engaged in fellowship and engaged in
    personal sharing

86
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Tim Dolan, Assistant Director for the Institute
    of Lay and Clergy Leadership
  • Weyerhaeuser Center for Christian Faith and
    Learning, Whitworth College, Spokane, WA
  • (cont.)
  • Findings
  • ? Pastoral leaders are leaving ministry due to
    organizational leadership issues, conflict and
    relationship issues
  • ? Many pastors had no training around these
    issues
  • ? Ongoing support and learning in a small group
    was very important to the success of the program.
    When they learned something, they could go home
    and try it out, then come back and debrief.
  • ? The personal support that the group provided
    helped the learning be deeper and more
    meaningful.
  • ? Sharing is easier in an ecumenical group.
  • ? Clergy and churches are willing to support such
    projects when they understand them, and it
    doesnt take a lot of money. The program was
    funded with 500 from each clergy person.

87
The Landscape of Continuing Education in The
United Methodist Church SNAPSHOTS IN CONTINUING
EDUCATION Academic Institutions and Conference
Centers
  • Tim Dolan, Assistant Director for the Institute
    of Lay and Clergy Leadership
  • Weyerhaeuser Center for Christian Faith and
    Learning, Whitworth College, Spokane, WA
  • (cont.)
  • Concerns with long-term learning groups
  • ? Money i
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