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Title: Promoting Interactive Literacy Between Young Children and Their Parents, Caregivers, Librarians, and Teachers


1
Promoting Interactive Literacy Between Young
Children and Their Parents, Caregivers,
Librarians, and Teachers
  • Presented by
  • Sandy Sinclair, Mary Hefner, and Blair Perez

2
  • The purpose of this workshop is to present
    interactive literacy skills which will engage
    young children and the adults who care for them.
    Adults will develop confidence in their skills to
    teach and foster early literacy skills.

3
The information presented in this workshop is
intended to inform, assist, and inspire
  • Parents, Caregivers,
  • Teachers, Librarians,
  • as well as
  • anyone who would like to become more
    knowledgeable about promoting early literacy
    skills in young children.

4
Overview of Program Objectives 
  • Raise awareness of current research on the
    development of early literacy skills for young
    children.
  • Facilitate interaction between preschool children
    and their parents, caregivers and teachers in
    order to promote early literacy skills.
  • Support parents as children's first teachers and
    increase awareness of the important impact of
    family involvement.
  • Create interactions with books that will increase
    children's motivation to learn to read
  • Make read-alouds and story hours more interactive
    and effective in developing pre-reading and
    reading skills.
  • Explore other opportunities to foster early
    literacy skills through activities.
  • Develop resource materials from sources shared
    during this workshop

5
What is Interactive Literacy?
  • Adult and child
  • Relying on the give and take of conversation with
    each other and on a shared context to obtain
    clues for understanding the message and the
    meaning of any new words and cognitive skills.
  • Interspersing conversation with the reading of a
    book, not just reading straight through the book.
  • Lea M. McGee and Donald J. Richgels. Designing
    Early Literacy Programs Strategies for At-Risk
    Preschool and Kindergarten Children. The Guilford
    Press. N.Y. 2003. p.84

6
What is Early Literacy?
  • Every thing a child
  • knows
  • about reading and writing
  • before
  • being able to read or write.

7
  • In 2002, the National Early Literacy Panel
    (NELP) was assembled conduct scientific research
    on the development of early literacy skills in
    children from birth to age five.
  • Their objective was to identify practices that
    would benefit the development of early literacy
    skills.
  • The panels extensive report entitled
    Developing Early Literacy was released in 2009
    Excerpted from National Early Literacy Panel.
    (2009). Developing Early Literacy Report of the
    National Early Literacy Panel, Executive Summary.
    Washington, DC National Institute for Literacy
  • This report provides research-based
    information useful to anyone concerned with
    fostering emerging literacy skills in young
    children.

8
One of the questions the NELP considered was
  • What are the skills and abilities of young
    children (age birth through five years or
    kindergarten) that predict later reading,
    writing, or spelling outcomes?

NELP research showed that six variables
consistently served as precursors to literacy
skills, even when other variables such as IQ or
socioeconomic status were taken into account.
9
The six predictive skills found to predict later
literacy success
  • Alphabet knowledge
  • Phonological awareness
  • Rapid automatic naming of letters or numbers
  • Rapid automatic naming of objects or colors
  • Writing
  • Phonological Memory

10
What is the Significance ofthe Six Predictive
Skills?
  • Nationally, 38 of fourth Graders cannot read at
    the basic level.
  • National Early Literacy Panel. (2009). Developing
    Early Literacy Report of the National Early
    Literacy Panel, Executive Summary. Washington,
    DC National Institute for Literacy
  • The percentage of children who are considered
    poor readers in first grade and remain poor
    readers in fourth grade can often be as high as
    88.
  • Jalongo, Mary Renck. Early Childhood Language
    Arts. 4th ed.,. Boston Pearson, 2007. p.156.
    Print.

11
There are an additional five early literacy
skills moderately predictive with later literacy
achievement
  • Concepts about print
  • Print knowledge
  • Reading readiness
  • Oral language
  • Visual processing

12
These five skills are usually more predictive of
literacy achievement at the end of Kindergarten
or beginning of 1st grade than of later
literacy growth.
13
Another questions the NELP considered was
  • Which programs, interventions, and other
    instructional approaches or procedures have
    contributed to or inhibited gains in children's
    skills and abilities that are linked to later
    outcomes in reading, writing, or spelling?

14
Approaches which improved oral language skills
  • Code-focused interventions
  • Shared reading that encouraged reader-child
    interactions.
  • Language enhancement instruction
  • Preschool and Kindergarten programs
  • Parent and home instruction focused on
    stimulating cognitive and linguistic development

15
  • Code-oriented interventions
  • Improved childrens knowledge of phonology and
    print conventions
  • Shared-book interventions
  • Enhanced childrens language development

16
The NELP research clearly suggests
  • There are many ways that parents, caregivers
    and teachers can influence and benefit the
    emerging literacy of young children.
  • Awareness of these six predictive and five
    early literacy skills will foster emerging
    literacy.
  • Different approaches may serve to focus on
    different types of essential skills.

17
See you in 10 minutes
18
Normal Growth and Development of Children
  • Early Talkers Birth to Two-Year Olds
  • Talkers Two- and Three-Year Olds
  • Pre-Readers Four- and Five- Year Olds
  • Terms from Every Child Ready to Read_at_your
    library materials.

19
Matching normal growth and development with early
literacy skills
20
Promoting Early Literacy Behavior Burns, M.
S., Griffin, P., Snow, C. E. 1999. Starting Out
Right A Guide to Promoting Children's Reading
Success. Committee on the Prevention of Reading
Difficulties in Young Children, National Academy
Press Washington, DC. (Ordering information can
be found at http//www.nap.edu or
1-800-624-6242) Committee on the Prevention of
Reading Difficulties in Young Children. 1998.
Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young
Children. National Academy Press Washington, DC.
21
  • 1. Be a model of literate behavior for your
    children.
  • How can you show your child that you use writing
    each day to help you?
  • Pre-talker
  • Talker
  • Pre-Reader

22
  • 2. Discuss printed text, words and sounds as
    objects that can be thought about, manipulated,
    altered, and explored
  • Pre-talker
  • Talker
  • Pre-Reader

23
  • 3. Help children build and use their ever-growing
    vocabulary.
  • Pre-talker
  • Talker
  • Pre-Reader

24
  • 4. Provide children with the tools of literate
    behavior
  • Pre-talker
  • Talker
  • Pre-Reader

25
The following slides are several hands-on
interactive activities to promote early literacy
skills
26
Finger Plays
  • Who beginning with pre-talkers
  • Why to develop language and memory through song
    and rhyme
  • Materials None
  • Directions
  • Teach your child simple songs and actions to
  • Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star
  • The Eensy Weensy Spider
  • ABC song
  • Im a Little Teapot
  • Old MacDonald Had a Farm
  • Being able to say or sing simple nursery songs
    improves future reading skills

27
Blowing Bubbles
  • Who beginning with Talkers
  • Why strengthening facial muscles
  • Materials bubbles and wand
  • Directions Dip wand into homemade or
    store-bought bubbles and have your child blow
    gently into the wand. Experiment with different
    types of wands pipecleaners in various shapes,
    sieve, cheesecloth, etc.
  • Using facial muscles helps develop the muscles
    used in forming words properly

28
Play Dough
  • Who Talkers and older
  • Why Strengthen hand and finger muscles
  • Materials Play dough-homemade (recipe to follow)
    or store bought
  • Directions allow your child to poke, pull, and
    knead at the play dough. Encourage Pre-k
    children to make letters with dough.
  • Developing fine motor skills and coordination
    will help your child with writing skills

29
Play Dough Recipe
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 teaspoons cream of tartar
  • ½ cup salt
  • 1 Tablespoon cooking oil or baby oil (smells
    nicer)
  • Combine ingredients, transfer to frying pan on
    medium heat. Mix until formed into a ball.
    Using a spatula, place onto a heat resistant
    surface. Knead to dough-like consistency. When
    cooled, create letters and forms with your child.
  • Will keep in air-tight container for at least a
    month.

30
Color Search
  • Who Talkers and older
  • Why to identify colors
  • Materials cards or objects that have specific
    colors
  • Directions
  • Hold up an object that shows one color. Ask your
    child what else
  • he/she sees that is the same color as the one
    you are holding.
  • Allow time for the child to search the area.
  • Suggestion
  • Let the child carry the object around the room to
    look for a
  • match. Tell your child the name of the color of
    the object and
  • encourage your child to say the name of the
    color.
  • Being able to differentiate colors is an early
    step toward the
  • future when he/she will recognize differing
    shapes and letters.

31
Grab It Name It
  • Who Talkers and older
  • Why Vocabulary development
  • Materials a small bag, items that your child can
    name, such as a doll, pencil, toothbrush, key,
    ball, spoon, etc.
  • Directions Model for the child how to take an
    item from the bag and then name it using a
    complete sentence- I have a toothbrush. Now it
    is your childs turn. Encourage your child to use
    a complete sentence.
  • Children with good early literacy skills tend to
    have larger vocabularies. Studies show this is
    one of the best indicators of future reading
    success in elementary school.
  • Consider adding Trace the objects onto a piece
    of paper. Have your child match objects pulled
    from the bag. This is enhance your childs
    ability to match shapes a pre-literacy skill of
    understanding the shapes of the 26 letters of
    the alphabet.

32
Milk Bottle Tops
  • Who Talkers and older
  • Why help your child learn about letters in
    his/her name
  • Materials bottle tops, markers
  • Directions
  • Count out bottle tops to equal the number of
    letters in your childs name. Put one letter on
    each bottle top. Begin by having the bottle tops
    in order and state the names of each letter as
    you put them in order. Take away a letter and
    tell your child the name of the letter. Have
    him/her put it back and say the letter. As the
    child becomes more familiar with the letter
    names. Scramble the letters and have your child
    put them in correct order.

33
Itsy Bitsy Spider
  • Who All ages
  • Why Develop fine and gross motor skills learn
    to discriminate loud/soft and big/small develop
    listening skills to hear rhyming words
  • Materials
  • Consider reading the picture book before playing
    this game, especially if this is not a familiar
    rhyme.
  • Directions
  • Begin the itsy, bitsy spider in a normal voice
    and using the normal hand gestures. Then ask
    your child what would the rhyme sound like if the
    spider was a very tiny spider, a baby spider.
    Whisper the itsy, bitsy spider and make your
    fingers form a pincher motion, mimicking the
    larger hand motions done previously. Then ask
    your child what a giant spider would sound like.
    Shout the verse and stomp using exaggerated hand
    motions. For older preschoolers, make up your
    own versesask your child, What else can the
    spider climb?

34
Simon Says
  • Who Talkers and older
  • Why develop listening skills and following
    directions and learn body parts
  • Materials none
  • Directions Begin your directions by saying,
    Simon Says. You choose an action and a body
    part as follows, Simon says, touch your nose.
    For younger children, make the commands simple.
    As the child gets older, you can add left or
    right as well as other directional prompts and
    more difficult body parts (ankle, elbow, earlobe,
    etc.). Your child is to follow your commands as
    long as you have prefaced your command with Simon
    Says. If you say, Touch your nose, but leave
    out Simon Says, then your child should not follow
    your directions. For children under 5, this game
    is played without having children sit out until
    there is a winner. Take turns, have your child
    be Simon, and see if he/she can stump you.
  • Children with good listening skills are usually
    more ready for Kindergarten than children with
    poor listening skills.

35
The Whispering Game
  • Who Talkers and older
  • Why improve listening skills/memory
  • Materials none
  • Directions
  • Whisper fun directions for your child to follow.
    These can be the same as ones used in Simon Says
    or more active ones. Help your child to listen by
    putting your finger to your lips. Have your child
    stand facing you while you whisper the
    directions. Begin with one direction, such as
    Pat your tummy. As your child becomes more
    skilled at listening increase the number of steps
    in the directions, Pat your tummy, jump three
    times, and touch your nose. Keep steps to about
    three for better success for your child.

36
Interactive Reading Activities
  • Reading Age-Appropriate Books
  • Incorporating Interactive Activities that Broaden
    the Literacy Experience for the Child.

37
Interactive Literacy Activities for Early Talkers
  • I Love You like Crazy Cakes
  • by Rose Lewis
  • All About Me
  • Theme Family

38
Interactive Literacy Activities for Early
Talkers (continued)
  • I Love You like Crazy Cakes Activity
  • This book can be read and enjoyed by older
    children and adopted children but it is a great
    story to share with your baby as a new mother!

39
Interactive Literacy Activitiesfor Early Talkers
(continued)
  • After sharing the book, write a journal story
    about your own experiences with your new baby.
    Include your feelings about seeing your baby for
    the first time, relatives that have visited your
    baby, preparing your childs room or furnishings,
    and favorite times with him/her that you have
    shared.

40
Interactive Literacy Activitiesfor Early Talkers
(another example)
  • You Are Special, Little One
  • by Nancy Tafuri Seasons---Theme Spring
  • Activity
  • Babies are curious about the world they live in!
    Share new experiences with your child. Remember
    to talk, talk, talk to your baby about
    everything.
  • Some fun activities to do in the good weather
    outdoors may be
  • Blow bubbles with your baby.
  • Fly a kite. Babies, children, and adults all like
    this activity!
  • Feed the ducks at a park.
  • Go to a Festival and listen to music.
  • Put out a bird feeder and enjoy the birds.
  • Do at least one of these activities with your
    baby and write about it.

41
Interactive Literacy Activitiesfor Talkers
  • David Gets in Trouble
  • by David Shannon
  • All About Me
  • Theme- Family

42
Interactive Literacy Activitiesfor Talkers
(continued)
  • David Gets in Trouble
  • Activity
  • David acts bad sometimes, but he is not bad! Do
    not ever call your child bad. He/she may do
    something that you consider bad but you call what
    he did bad not him! During the toddler years,
    children will test you. The best thing to do at
    this age is to distract them or change their
    environment. Hitting your child only teaches him
    to hit.

43
Interactive Literacy Activitiesfor Talkers
(continued)
  • David Gets in Trouble
  • This book will help you talk about discipline
    with your toddler and relate negative behaviors
    with David, the character in the book.
  • What happens when your child misbehaves? Compare
    Davids actions to your childs.
  • Where does he go for time-out?
  • Can he say he is sorry?
  • Discuss how it feels to be David/ and his mom!
  • Role-play this book with your child.
  • Have your child point to different things that
    you ask for in the book. Repeat his words in a
    sentence.
  • Talk about if David is a girl or boy. Ask him
    questions about what he is and you are, etc./
    girl or boy?

44
Interactive Literacy Activitiesfor Talkers
(another example)
  • You Are Special, Little One
  • by Nancy Tafuri Seasons---Theme Spring
  • Activity
  • Babies are curious about the world they live in!
    Share new experiences with your child. Remember
    to talk, talk, talk to your baby about
    everything.
  • Some fun activities to do in the good weather
    outdoors may be
  • Blow bubbles with your baby.
  • Fly a kite. Babies, children, and adults all like
    this activity!
  • Feed the ducks at a park.
  • Go to a Festival and listen to music.
  • Put out a bird feeder and enjoy the birds.
  • Do at least one of these activities with your
    baby and write about it.

45
Interactive Literacy Activitiesfor Pre-Readers
  • The Wednesday Surprise
  • by Eve Bunting All About Me
  • Tell Me a Story, MaMa
  • by Angela Johnson
  • Theme Family

46
Interactive Literacy Activitiesfor Pre-Readers
  • Activity
  • Visit an older person like a grandmother and
    share a book with them.
  • Have the senior citizen tell a favorite story to
    your child.
  • Discuss with your child the problems Annas
    grandmother faced because she couldnt read.
  • How does she make a shopping list?
  • What kind of job could she have?
  • How does she know which bus to get on?
  • Talk to your child about an older person that was
    important to you when growing up.

47
Interactive Literacy Activitiesfor Pre-Readers
(another example)
  • Leaf Season
  • by Quinlan B. Lee Seasons
  • Best Times Ever a Book about Seasons and Holidays
  • by Richard Scarry
  • Theme Autumn

48
Interactive Literacy Activitiesfor Pre-Readers
  • Activity
  • To be able to talk, your child must be able to
    hear well and listen. Listening exercises can be
    fun for him!
  • Have your child listen for
  • Birds and insects
  • Cars, airplanes, and trains
  • Animals
  • Leaves rustling in the wind
  • Water
  • Talk about how these things sound. Write about
    what you and your child heard.
  • Fall is also a good time to share new foods with
    your child. Bring him to a farm/fruit stand and
    pick out apples, or foods that you both would
    like to try. In the grocery store, point out
    different foods to you toddler. Write down new
    foods that interested your child.

49
Individual Learning ActivitiesInteractive
Projects
  • Phonological awareness is the understanding that
    oral language can be broken up into individual
    words, words into syllables, and syllables into
    individual sounds, or phonemes (Bradley Bryant,
    1983 Snow, Burns, Griffin,1998).
  • With adequate preschool instruction and exposure
    to literate environments, however, ELLs can
    readily learn phonemic awareness skills (Barnett
    et al., 2007). ELLs with strong phonological
    awareness skills in English demonstrate a higher
    potential for reading achievement in later years
    (e.g., Genesee, et al., 2005 Klingner, et al.,
    2004).

50
ILA- Interactive Projects (continued)
  • Because of these findings and the teacher
    observing a lack of nursery rhyme awareness, ILA
    activities were built around this concept. As a
    group during ILA, the children and moms gather
    around a large poster book and say together three
    simple nursery rhymes.
  • The children have been exposed to them at circle
    time, during transitions, and in many book
    sharing times. The moms have been exposed to
    them at parenting class and have copies in their
    newsletters and in a mom-made Nursery Rhyme book.
    The ones that the staff and parents chose were
    Humpty Dumpty, Jack Be Nimble, Row, Row, Row
    Your Boat, and Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star.

51
Interactive Literacy Project Humpty Dumpty
  • The parents have been told that there are
    different projects around the class for the
    children to pick if they are interested or able
    to do because of their age.
  • ILA
  • Humpty, Dumpty will involve making a paper cup
    puppet to use to dramatize the rhyme as the child
    and mom say it together. The child can make the
    oval shape with face features and arms and legs
    while mom talks about body parts and details. If
    cutting is an appropriate skill then the child
    can cut Humpty out. After attaching a straw to
    the egg, then the child can draw lines on a red
    piece of construction paper to make it look like
    a wall. Have mom tape the wall to the cup and
    enjoy making Humpty go up and down in the cup as
    the family recites the rhyme.

52
Interactive Literacy ProjectJack Be Nimble
  • Jack Be Nimble will have been started the day
    before by the children painting empty toilet
    paper rolls their favorite color so they could
    dry.
  • The flames can be cut from yellow construction
    paper and attached to the candlesticks.
  • Moms and children will say the nursery rhyme and
    jump over the homemade candlesticks as they
    change the name of Jack to their own!

53
Interactive Literacy ProjectTwinkle, Twinkle
Little Star
  • Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star will consist of
    decorating a cardboard star shape
  • (glitter for older children, stickers and dippy
    dots for younger)
  • Then rolling up construction paper into a wand to
    wave.
  • Moms and children can practice singing or saying
    the rhyme.

54
Interactive Literacy ProjectNursery Rhyme Contest
  • Nursery Rhyme Contest
  • Mothers learn nursery rhymes for a contest to be
    held by the teacher
  • The students are also learning the nursery rhymes
  • The mother who knows the most nursery rhymes wins
    the contest
  • Parent and child recite the rhymes together
    during a Parent and Child Activity
  • As a follow-up, parents are instructed to have
    the child pick out a nursery rhyme book and they
    practice reading the book to their child using
    the instructions given in a prior ILA, i.e., the
    handout from the Family Literacy Foundation
    called Read Aloud Techniques

55
Bon appétit!See you in one hour
56
Adults Role in Interactive Read-Alouds has 5
purposes
  • 1. To prompt childrens active involvement in
    constructing a books meaning
  • 2. To clarify and extend childrens understanding
    about the meaning of the book
  • 3. To expand and extend the language of
    childrens responses
  • 4. To explain the meanings of some vocabulary
    included in the book and
  • 5. To prompt children to use new vocabulary in
    their responses.
  • Lea M. McGee and Donald J. Richgels. Designing
    Early Literacy Programs Strategies for At-Risk
    Preschool and Kindergarten Children. The Guilford
    Press. N.Y. 2003. p.85

57
Interactive Read-Alouds Getting Children
Engaged in Listening
  • Pick a book
  • Preview the book
  • Introduce the book
  • Read the book interactively
  • Involve students in after-reading activities
  • Gail E. Tompkins. Language Arts Essentials.
    Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, N.J.
    2006. p. 49

58
Interactive Read-Alouds Getting Children
Engaged in Listening
  • Researchers who have studied reading aloud, have
    concluded that students are better listeners when
    they are involved while the teacher is reading,
    not afterward.
  • Gail E. Tompkins. Language Arts Essentials.
    Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, N.J.
    2006. p. 49

59
Interactive Read-Alouds Getting Children
Engaged in Listening
  • More effective to pause reading
  • At points where child can make predictions and
    suggest connections
  • After reading episodes that child might find
    confusing and
  • Just before it becomes clear how the story will
    end.
  • Gail E. Tompkins. Language Arts Essentials.
    Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, N.J.
    2006. p. 49

60
Interactive Guided Reading for Readers overall
mental picture of the text being read
  • Teacher carefully guides, directs, or coaches
    students through the silent reading of a
    meaningful chunk of text by asking them a
    question, giving prompts or helping them
    formulate a question that they then try to answer
    as they read the designated section of text.
  • When students need a great deal of support in
    constructing meaning from the text because of the
    complexity of the text or their limited
    abilities.
  • Teacher can adjust the support or scaffolding
    according to the students needs.
  • J. David Cooper. Literacy Helping Children
    Construct Meaning. 6th Ed. Houghton Mifflin Co.
    Boston. 2006. pp. 35

61
Interactive Guided Readingfor Readers overall
mental picture of the text being read
  • Effective questions or prompts meet the following
    criteria
  • Questions or prompts given before reading should
    lead students to the important ideas in the text
    in expository text on the main idea in
    narrative text on the setting, major characters,
    story problem, action, resolution, and overall
    theme.
  • Questions or prompts used during discussion
    between the reading of sections should pull
    together ideas brought out in reading and should
    help build relationships among ideas.
  • Questions and prompts should follow the order of
    the text.
  • J. David Cooper. Literacy Helping Children
    Construct Meaning. 6th Ed. Houghton Mifflin Co.
    Boston. 2006. pp. 37

62
Interactive Writing
  • The process in which the teacher takes down a
    childs dictation, verbally stretching each word
    so that the child can distinguish sounds and
    letters. Also known as shared writing.
  • Susan B. Newman, Carol Cripple, and Sue
    Bredekamp. Learning to Read and Write
    Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Young
    Children. NAEYC. Washington, DC 2000. pp. 131

63
Dialogic Reading
  • http//www.walearning.com/language/preview-videos
  • Washington
  • Learning
  • Systems, LLC.

64
Dialogic reading is a bridge between a child and
new words
  • Make a comment and wait
  • -make a comment about what your child is looking
    at
  • -count silently to 5 to give your child time
    to respond.
  • Ask question and wait
  • -questions can elicit a single word answer or
    sentences
  • Respond by adding a little more
  • -ask questions that encourage longer answers
  • C comment
  • A Ask
  • R - Respond

65
Dialogic Reading Tipsfor English Language
Learners
  • Heritage language is a treasure we give our
    children
  • Use the dialogic reading technique with the
    language with which you are most comfortable

66
Dialogic Reading Practice
  • Look through the books on the table and choose
    one book with lots of fun pictures that interest
    you.
  • Buddy up with one partner
  • Share this book with your partner using the three
    tips for dialogic reading
  • Comment, Ask, and Respond
  • Change roles with your partner

67
Literacy at the Grocery Store
  • Many of your everyday activities can be
    literacy-learning occasions for your child.

68
  • Some suggestions
  • Make a grocery list give your child his or her
    own paper to write on
  • Clip coupons keep old food labels for
    comparison
  • Read labels have your younger child look for
    special letters
  • Read a recipe make a rebus of ingredients for
    younger children
  • V. Susan Bennett-Armistead, Nell K. Duke, Annie
    M. Moses. Literacy and the Youngest Learner Best
    Practices for Educators of Children form Birth to
    5. Scholastic Teaching Resources. NY. 2005. p.
    221

69
Interactive Strategies for children with
disabilities
  • Notice and interpret your childs behavior as
    attempts to initiate interactions
  • Respond promptly and positively to your childs
    behavior
  • Match the positive intensity of your childs
    behavior
  • Respond to your childs behavior with comments,
    praise and/or adaptations that help your child
    continue the activity
  • Retrieved on 3/18/2010 from http//www.earlylitera
    cylearning.org/presentations.php

70
Interactive Strategies for children with
disabilities
  • Elaborate your childs attempts at interaction or
    participation in the activity
  • Add new materials and encourage your child to do
    something different
  • Provide physical assistance only when needed
  • Encourage your childs developmentally
    appropriate use of behaviors
  • Retrieved on 3/18/2010 from http//www.earlylitera
    cylearning.org/presentations.php

71
Early Literacy Outcomes
  • Answering the following questions will help you
    know whether your child is growing in the area of
    early literacy learning

72
Early Literacy Outcome Questions
  • Is your child actively participating in the
    literacy activity?
  • Does your child appear to enjoy the literacy
    activity?
  • Is your child working hard at trying to do the
    literacy activity?
  • Does your child request the literacy activity at
    other times?
  • Does your child try to do something new as part
    of the literacy activity?

73
The Center for Early Literacy Learning website
  • Excellent resource for hundreds of interactive
    ideas for children with and without disabilities
  • http//www.earlyliteracylearning.org/cellpractices
    _rev/CELLprac_Baby_1st_ABC_Bk.pdf

74
Do computers provide a tool for early childhood
learning?
  • Studies have shown that Computer Assisted
    Instruction has been successful in
  • Teaching children the difference between left and
    right
  • Promoting phonological awareness of letter sounds
  • Acquiring early spelling, pre- reading and
    writing skills
  • Teaching basic understanding of geometrical
    concepts
  • Vernadakis, Nicholas, Andreas Averginos, Efi
    Tsitakari, and Evridiki Zachopoulopu. "The Use of
    Computer Assisted Instruction in Preschool
    Education Making Teaching Meaningful." Early
    Childhood Education Journal. 33.2 (2005) 99-104.
    Print.

75
The appropriate software is key. Important
things to consider
  • Is the software program developmentally
    appropriate and does it help to create a new
    opportunity for learning?
  • Are the graphics, animation, and music helpful or
    distracting?
  • Is the software free from stereotypes of
    differing abilities, gender, and culture?
  • Are there any underlying negative messages? For
    example, if a drawing program has the option of
    erasing work by blowing it up, does this imply to
    young children that it is better to destroy a
    problem rather than find a way to resolve it?
  • Teachers need to select software using the same
    careful and professional judgment as they do when
    selecting other instructional materials

76
It is also important to note that computer
learning does not have to be a solitary task.
  • Research has shown a significantly higher
    achievement level for preschool students who
    interacted with adults while using the computer.
  • Vernadakis, Nicholas, Andreas Averginos, Efi
    Tsitakari, and Evridiki Zachopoulopu. "The Use of
    Computer Assisted Instruction in Preschool
    Education Making Teaching Meaningful." Early
    Childhood Education Journal. 33.2 (2005) 99-104.
    Print.
  • It is also recommended that two children work
    together. Some quality early childhood software
    programs are specifically designed to elicit,
    encourage, and extend young childrens
    communication and collaboration.
  • Tsantis, Linda, Cynthia Bewick, and
    Suzanne Thouvenelle. "Examining Some Common Myths
    About Computer Ues in the Early Years." Beyond
    the Journal, Young Children on the Web (2003) n.
    pag. Web. 24 Mar 2010. lthttp//www.naeyc.org/files
    /yc/file/200311/CommonTechnoMyths.pdfgt.

77
Research Indicates
  • Kindergarten students quickly become comfortable
    when using the computer and show an eagerness to
    learn when at a computer.
  • Kindergarten students also show an eagerness to
    help each other and an increase in self esteem
    when exposed to learning through computer-based
    activities.
  • Kindergarten students involved in daily,
    structured computer activities have a more
    significant increase in concept age than those
    students in a more traditional setting
  • (This research was based on an average computer
    usage of 30 minutes per day by children
    individually or with a partner)

Grubbs, Patricia W. A Comparison of Concept Age
Gains of Kindergarten Children in Traditional and
Twenty-first Century Classrooms. Diss. Johnson
Bible College, 2000. Knoxville Accessed 3/26/10.
htp//www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/Home.portal?ER
ICExtSearch_SearchType_0kw_nfpbtruesearchtype
keyword_nflsfalse_pageLabelRecordDetailsaccno
ED443523ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0ED443523
78
Computer interactions will never produce the same
kind of learning as interactive reading, stacking
blocks, finger painting, or pouring sand from one
bucket into another. Still
  • Research has shown that there were noticeable
    positive differences in second graders who were
    appropriately exposed to computers during
    preschool. Children with early exposure
    exhibited increased comfort and facility in
    using computers and a greater understanding of
    how to use computers in a more purposeful way in
    their learning.
  • Considering the ever increasing use of
    technology in elementary education this is
    important information to take note of when
    creating an early learning environment.

Tsantis, Linda, Cynthia Bewick, and Suzanne
Thouvenelle. "Examining Some Common Myths About
Computer Ues in the Early Years." Beyond the
Journal, Young Children on the Web (2003) n.
pag. Web. 24 Mar 2010. lthttp//www.naeyc.org/files
/yc/file/200311/CommonTechnoMyths.pdfgt.
79
Computer assisted instruction provides another
way for parents, teachers and classmates to
interact. Integrating appropriate use of
computers may facilitate early learning and
provide a way to
  • Make learning more accessible to children who
    absorb information better visually and through
    sound.
  • Allow children to learn at their own pace,
    achieving one level of knowledge before moving on
    to the next.
  • Allow teachers another effective way to monitor
    learning and guide instruction.
  • Provide another way to develop motor skills
    through the use of the keyboard and mouse.
  • Provide an alternative method to exploring
    important concepts
  • of literacy in preparation for elementary
    school.

80
  • Childrens unique interests, ways of
    knowing, and dispositions influence how and to
    what extent they participate in early literacy
    events, and in turn, the knowledge they
    construct
  • Gretchen Owocki, author and educator

81
Discussion Questionschoose one
  • A parent in your class/library story time tells
    you that her three-year old hates to read books
    at home. Based on the information in this
    presentation what suggestions would you make.
  • Your preschool received a donation of 1500 for
    interactive materials. How will you suggest it be
    spent?
  • Practice reading a story based on the dialogic
    reading technique and report your findings.

82
Thank you for attending our workshopPlease look
through our extensive list of resources for
additional ideas
83
  • There are five handouts with our presentation
  • Handout 1-Children with Disabilities
  • Handout 2-Dialogic Reading Workshop
  • Handout 3-Annotated ILA-related Websites
  • Handout 4-Sample from website of Preschool Ideas
  • Handout 5-Planning and Preparation for an ILA
    Workshop

84
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1992. p.372. Print. Bennett-Armistead, Susan
V., Nell K. Duke, and Annie M. Moses. Literacy
and the Youngest Learner Best Practices for
Educators of Children from Birth to 5. New York
Scholastic- Teaching Resources, 2005. p.240.
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Dodge. Reading Right from the Start What Parents
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86
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