The Fall of Satan from Paradise Lost - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – The Fall of Satan from Paradise Lost PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 3bc217-MWU1M



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

The Fall of Satan from Paradise Lost

Description:

The Fall of Satan from Paradise Lost John Milton Paradise Lost Book I Invocation and introduction of poem's theme An account of Satan's revolt and expulsion from ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:1293
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 29
Provided by: mpsazOrgm
Learn more at: http://www.mpsaz.org
Category:
Tags: fall | lost | paradise | satan

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: The Fall of Satan from Paradise Lost


1
The Fall of Satan from Paradise Lost
  • John Milton

2
Paradise Lost Book I
  • Invocation and introduction of poem's theme
  • An account of Satan's revolt and expulsion from
    Heaven
  • Dialogue between Satan and Beelzebub
  • The other devils' rallying around Satan - the
    demonic host listed
  • Satan's speech to the legions (about the creation
    of man)
  • The building of Pandemonium

3
Overview
  • Of Mans first disobedience, and the fruit
  • Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste
  • Brought death into the world, and, all our woe,
  • With the loss of Eden, till one greater Man
  • Restore us, and regain the blissful seat,(1-5)
  • refers to original sin of Adam and Eve
  • brought humans death for the first time

4
Overview
  • Sing, Heavenly Muse
  • That shepherd, who first taught the chosen seed
  • In the beginning how the Heavens and Earth
  • Rose out of Chaos (6-10)
  • not asking for tradition Greek muse
  • asking for Holy Spirit to inspire him as he did
    Moses to write the Ten Commandments and Genesis

5
Overview
  • His poem will be better than all other classical
    writings
  • Reason for writing
  • And justify the ways of God to men (26).
  • Why God permits humans to suffer and die
  • His poem will tell of the epic battle between God
    and Lucifer

6
Disobedience of Adam and Eve
  • Say first, for Heaven hides nothing from thy
    view,
  • Nor the deep tract of Hell, say first what cause
  • Moved our grand parents in that happy state,
  • Favored of Heaven so highly, to fall off
  • From their Creator, and transgress his will
  • For one restraint (27-32).
  • God saw the transgression of Adam and Eve
  • Questions how this came about

7
Disobedience of Adam and Eve
  • Who first seduced them to that foul revolt?
  • The infernal Serpent, he who was, whose guile,
  • Stirred up with envy and revenge, deceived
  • The mother of mankind, what time his pride
  • Had cast him out from Heaven, with his host
  • Of rebel angels (33-38).
  • Satan corrupted Gods plan out of vengeance
  • God allows evil to exist in order that good may
    arise from it
  • Satan thrown out of Heaven by God
  • He is to blame for original sin

8
Satan
  • He wanted to be like God
  • Rebelled and was punished
  • To set himself in glory above his peers,
  • He trusted to have equaled the Most High,
  • If he opposed and with ambitious aim
  • Against the throne and monarchy of God,
  • Raised impious was in Heaven and battle proud
  • With vain attempt.(39-44)

9
Satan and Hell
  • Him the Almighty Power
  • Hurled headlong flaming from the ethereal sky
  • With hideous ruin and combustion down
  • To bottomless perdition, there to dwell
  • In adamantine chains and penal fire
  • Who durst defy the Omnipotent to arms (44- 49).
  • Thrown out into depths of hell by God

10
Hell
  • Milton uses darkness and imagery to indicate the
    horridness of Hell
  • fiery gulf (52)
  • dungeon horrible (61)
  • No light, but rather darkness visible (63)
  • discover sights of woe (64)

11
Hell
  • Regions of sorrow, doleful shades, where peace
  • And rest can never dwell, hope never comes
  • That comes to all but torture without end
  • Still urges
  • Such place Eternal Justice had prepared
  • For those rebellious, here their prison ordained
  • In utter darkness, and their portion set
  • As far removed from God and the light of Heaven
    (65-73).
  • Physical torment- fiery yet dark
  • Physiological pain
  • doom Lost happiness dismay
  • Eternal punishment
  • Light and dark imagery

12
Beelzebub
  • He soon discerns, and weltering by his side
  • One next himself in power, and next in crime,
  • Long after known in Palestine, and named
  • Beelzebub (78-81).
  • Second in power under Satan

13
Satan
  • Bemoans their place in Hell
  • If thou beest he- but O how fallen! How
    changed
  • From him, who in the happy realm of light
  • Clothed with transcendent brightness didst
    outshine
  • Myriads though bright- if he whom mutual league,
  • United thoughts and counsels, equal hope
  • And hazard in the glorious enterprise,
  • Joined with me once, now misery hath joined
  • In equal ruin into what pit thou seest
  • From what height fallen! (84-91)
  • Tells Beelzebub he has been transformed for the
    worse by Gods punishment
  • Mourns heaven when he sees the state of Beelzebub
  • Does not repent for his rebellion

14
Satan
  • so much the stronger proved
  • He with his thunder and till then who knew
  • The force of those of those dire arms? (92-94).
  • Did not realize the strength and power of God

15
Satan
  • Sees himself as the enemy of God
  • Yet not for those,
  • Nor what the potent Victor in his rage
  • Can else inflict, do I repent or change,
    (95-97).
  • Innumerable forces
  • Two powers
  • Engage in dubious battle
  • Heaven as a lost field
  • God is Satans lost foe
  • eternal war (93-124)
  • Presents them as his army
  • Diction represents war

16
Satan
  • the unconquerable will,
  • And study of revenge, immortal hate,
  • And courage never to submit or yield
  • And what is else not to be overcome? (106-109)
  • Driving force for Satan
  • God was upset by the battle- he was uncertain
    about the outcome

17
Satan
  • Will continue was for eternity
  • since by fate the strength of gods
  • And this emerged substance cannot fail,
  • Since through experience of this great event,
  • In arms not worse, in foresight much advanced,
  • We may with more successful hope resolve
  • To wage by force or guile eternal war
  • Irreconcilable to our grand Foe,
  • Who now triumphs, and in the excess of joy,
  • Sole reigning holds the tyranny of Heaven.
    (116-124)

18
Satan
  • Will wage war against Gods tyranny
  • God in heaven rejoicing
  • Take action once again

19
Beelzebubs Response
  • That with sad overthrow and foul defeat
  • Hath lost us Heaven, and all this mighty host
  • In horrible destruction laid thus low,
  • As far as gods and heavenly essences
  • Can perish/
  • Here swallowed up up in endless misery.
  • (135-142).

20
Beelzebub's Response
  • Doubtful
  • Can we overpower God and his supremacy?
  • Realizes the horridness of their situation

21
Beelzebub's Response
  • That we may so suffice his vengeful ire,
  • Or do him mightier service as his thralls
  • By right of war, whateer his business be,
  • Here in the heart of Hell to work in fire,
  • Or do his errands in the gloomy deep?
  • What can it then avail, though yet we feel
  • Strength undiminished, or eternal being
  • TO undergo eternal punishment? (148-155).

22
Beelzebubs Response
  • Questions if they are still slaves of Gods
  • Their punishment in hell is to do Gods bidding
    in hell

23
Satans Response
  • to be weak is miserable (157)
  • To do aught good never will be our task,
  • But ever to do ill our sole delight
  • As being the contrary to his high will
  • Whom we resist (158-162).
  • Only commit deeds of evil
  • God cannot control that
  • His evil will equal Gods goodness

24
Satans Response
  • Seest thou yon dreary plain, forlorn and wild,
  • The seat of desolation, void of light,
  • Save what the glimmering of these livid flames
  • Casts pale and dreadful? (180-183)
  • Satans perspective of Hell
  • He realizes the horror of it and is repelled by
    it

25
Satans Response
  • And reassembling our afflicted powers,
  • Consult how we may henceforth most offend
  • Our Enemy, our own loss how repair,
  • How overcome this dire calamity,
  • What reinforcement we may gain from hope,
  • If not, what resolution from despair. (186-191)
  • Satans plan of action
  • Seek vengeance for the offence

26
Satan
  • Prone on the flood, extended long and large,
  • Lay floating many a rood, in bulk as huge
  • As whom the fables name of monstrous size,
  • Titanian or Earth-born, that warred on Jove,
  • Briareos or Typhon whom led the den
  • By ancient Tarus held, or that sea-beast
  • Leviathan, which God od all his works
  • Created hugest that swim the ocean stream.
    (195-202)
  • Indicates the hugeness and vastness of Satan
  • Compared to Titans and giants from Greek
    Mythology

27
Satan
  • this is the seat
  • That we must change for Heaven, this mournful
    gloom
  • For that celestial light? Be it so, since he
  • Who now is sovereign can dispose and bid
  • What shall be right farthest from him is best,
  • Whom reason hath equaled, force hath made supreme
  • Above his equals. (243-249)
  • Accepts his new placement and wants to reign
    sovereign
  • Happy to have his own kingdom to rule
  • Proves he is Gods equal
  • Pride
  • Better to reign in Hell than serve in Heaven
    (263)
  • Eager to rally his forces- needs support to rebel
    against God

28
Epic Simile
  • Something in the poem is compared to something
    quite outside the poem
  • Compares Satan to Titans and Greeks from
    mythology (196-208)
  • Compares his landing to smashing of a hill or
    volcano which create an explosive force (230-237)
About PowerShow.com