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Multimedia Journalism Overview of Internet Reporting and Multimedia Storytelling

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Multimedia Journalism Overview of Internet Reporting and Multimedia Storytelling Sec. C1 - Jan. 26, 2009 Why are you here? South Park ep. 12.06 Over Logging ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Multimedia Journalism Overview of Internet Reporting and Multimedia Storytelling


1
Multimedia JournalismOverview of Internet
Reporting and Multimedia Storytelling
  • Sec. C1 - Jan. 26, 2009

2
Why are you here?
South Park ep. 12.06 Over Logging
3
Why are you here?
  • Youre here because as journalists, you need to
    know how to reach your audience.
  • According to Pew, the internet has surpassed
    newspapers as a leading source of news.
  • 40 percent of people get most of their news from
    the Web, which is up from 24 percent from 2007.
  • Virtually every media sector apart from the
    internet is slowly losing Americans attention
  • A recent Pew survey says Journalists are ready
    even eager to embrace new technologies!

4
Multimedia Storytelling in 5 Stepsstep 1
  • Choosing a story
  • The best candidates for multimedia packages are
  • Multidimensional Video, audio,
    infographics/charts, etc--Interactive elements
    can all help enhance the story
  • Nonlinear Newspaper readership drops with each
    graf, so why not let the audience jump around
    from tidbit to tidbit?
  • As in print, multiple entry points are important.
  • In a good package, there is no first part or
    second part Engage audiences by letting them
    look at whats most important to them first.

5
Multimedia Storytelling in 5 Stepsstep 1
  • Choosing a story class discussion
  • A journalist wants to travel all over the lower
    48. How do you make his road trip engaging?
  • A year after the Viginia Tech shootings, youre
    asked to talk to survivors and people who knew
    the dead. How do you tell their stories?
  • Your organization is covering the ins-and-outs of
    Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. There are
    lots of details to share here, so how do you do
    it?

6
Multimedia Storytelling in 5 Stepsstep 1
  • Choosing a story
  • Case study Storm that Drowned a City
  • Each feature covers a different aspect of
    Hurricane Katrina Users can choose the stories
    that interest them
  • Nonlinear parts The stories dont depend on one
    another to be understood, and neither do
    individual parts within the stories. See Anatomy
    of Katrina
  • Video, audio, images and graphics are used where
    necessary.
  • Note A long text piece is broken up into
    readable sections.
  • Note Nothing gets buried. Tabs and links are
    shortcuts.
  • We wont do anything this advanced, but you
    should study it. What makes this effective? Which
    principles can you use?

7
Multimedia Storytelling in 5 Stepsstep 2
  • Creating a storyboard
  • According to NewsU, you should fashion a
    storyboard of multimedia possibilities before
    heading out into the field.
  • Conduct preliminary interviews, get a basic idea
    of what to expect in the field, look up anything
    your sources have published in print or on the
    Web.
  • Collect visuals -- photos, videos, maps and
    graphics -- from your sources or from the Web to
    get an idea of potential story components. Track
    down any previous stories on the topic -- print,
    video, radio or Web.
  • - Storm that Drowned a City resources page

8
Multimedia Storytelling in 5 Stepsstep 2
  • Creating a storyboard
  • Define the elements Divide the story up into
    parts such as a nut graf explaining your focus,
    background, information on people involved, etc.
  • Are there compelling visuals?
  • Is there a process involved that you can
    illustrate with graphics? (How a hurricane forms,
    for example)
  • Would a map be useful?
  • Etc.

9
Multimedia Storytelling in 5 Stepsstep 2
  • Creating a storyboard
  • Identify the media
  • Video is best for showing action it takes
    audiences to a place central to the story.
  • Audio If its good, it adds to video and
    slideshows if its bad, it takes away. Audiences
    forgive bad video before theyll forgive bad
    audio.
  • Text is good for binding a story together by
    offering background information or any other
    details that cant/shouldnt be conveyed through
    other media. (Example A video of New Orleans
    political history might not be as effective or
    informative as an article.)

10
Multimedia Storytelling in 5 Stepsstep 2
  • Creating a storyboard
  • Identify the media
  • Photographs are the best media for displaying
    strong emotion and keeping the mood.
  • Video goes by quickly photos illustrate the
    point of the story
  • Add audio and you enhance the mood make it
    panoramic and you put the reader there..
  • Graphics show how stuff works
  • They can chart important figures, display
    abstract ideas
  • Animate them and they can take you where cameras
    cant go (the eye of a hurricane, inside our
    cells, etc.)

11
Multimedia Storytelling in 5 Stepsstep 2
  • Creating a storyboard
  • Identify the media
  • Maps can show you important locations such as war
    zones, or they can be coupled with other
    information such as homicide statistics keep
    this in mind for when we make Google maps.
  • Actually storyboard the concept now
  • Youre working with a lot of media elements. The
    more complicated your piece gets, the better off
    youll be sketching out your different media and
    thinking about how users will navigate through
    them.
  • If you dont, youll risk burying the media and
    confusing users.

12
Multimedia Storytelling in 5 Stepsstep 3
  • Reporting with multimedia
  • Youre a multimedia journalist heading out into
    the field for a big story thatll utilize all of
    the elements we just discussed. What do you think
    youll need?

13
Multimedia Storytelling in 5 Stepsstep 3
  • Reporting with multimedia
  • Youre a multimedia journalist heading out into
    the field for a big story thatll utilize all of
    the elements we just discussed. What do you think
    youll need?
  • Equipment can include Batteries, cables,
    computer, audio recorder, video and still
    cameras, microphones, memory sticks and tapes,
    tripod, external hard drive, cell phone, lenses,
    GPS, etc.
  • Youre a multimedia journalist now, but dont
    forget the old school Bring notebooks, writing
    utensils, your AP stylebook, etc.

14
Multimedia Storytelling in 5 Stepsstep 4
  • Editing for the Web
  • Video
  • Keep em shortAJR reported in 2008 a survey
    showing the average length of video elements on
    newspaper sites being 2-3 minutes. (Editing can
    take 3-4 hours.)
  • Its a lot like television Show talking heads
    for a few seconds, then switch to "B-roll, etc.
  • Because the Web typically uses a low frame
    rateusually 15 fps rather than 30--avoid action
    shots with a lot of movement or shots that
    capture nuance. They usually display poorly on
    the Web.

15
Multimedia Storytelling in 5 Stepsstep 4
  • Editing for the Web
  • Audio
  • Use only high-quality audio.
  • One exception Very old/historic recordings
    necessary to your piece. Listen to examples from
    NOVAs Forgotten Genius
  • Use subtitles with the audio if you have no other
    options or to reinforce an important point.
  • Avoid using background music for straight news
    pieces. Web compression will already take away
    from your sound, and music will make it worse.

16
Multimedia Storytelling in 5 Stepsstep 4
  • Editing for the Web
  • Text
  • The comfort zone for print people--the medium
    they fall back on when they're unsure what else
    to do
  • Text is fine for headers, captions, a good nut
    graf, and background, but be sure to supplement
    it with audio and/or visuals if it makes sense.
  • Remember how newspaper readership falls with each
    graf? By shortening your text/breaking it up with
    other elements, you can keep people interested.
  • Text-only works best for political/economic
    stories, analysis, op-ed pieces and short
    updates. (It wouldnt kill you to throw in a
    photo, though.)

17
Multimedia Storytelling in 5 Stepsstep 4
  • Editing for the Web
  • Photos The Web is a visual medium, so be sure to
    include photos where possible.
  • Use photos to replace 1,000 words. Images arent
    just there to make things prettythey help
    explain things.
  • Photos can be used two ways
  • Individually, to set a mood
  • In groups, to tell stories as with "slide shows.
    (See how this slide show takes a complicated
    topic and simplifies it with pictures?)

18
Multimedia Storytelling in 5 Stepsstep 4
  • Editing for the Web
  • Graphics These arent just still images anymore.
  • You can make graphics interactive (clickable
    maps, navigable locations rendered in 3D, etc.).
  • Creating your own interactivity takes time.
    Generally, Flash animated graphics are the
    centerpiece (if not the only part) of a story,
    whereas, a Google map usually supplements a
    larger story.
  • Think TimeSpace Inauguration Map versus typical
    map use (where the map is just part of the story,
    used to illustrate where something or things
    happened).

19
Multimedia Storytelling in 5 Stepsstep 5
  • Producing the story
  • Multimedia journalists have multiple editors
  • There are your actual editors, and then there are
    your designers and Web developers. You cantand
    arent usually expected todo it all yourself
    (except in this class).
  • Developers/designers fine-tune the layout, help
    with technical glitches and make sure the
    presentation follows the site's style.
  • In a real-life scenario, you will probably have
    open communication with these guys. Theyll often
    do as much work as you, only without the
    bylinebe nice.

20
Eyetrack III(Speaking of design)
  • News Web sites have been around since the 1990s,
    but how effective are their layouts?
  • For Eyetrack III, Poynter recorded 46 peoples
    eye movements as they observed different site
    mockups.

21
Eyetrack III(Speaking of design)
  • The study shows that reading news on the Web is
    different than with print.
  • There are too many elements involved for us to go
    Left-Right / Top-Bottom.
  • On the Web, we generally start at the upper left
    read down and end at the upper right.

22
Eyetrack III(Speaking of design)
23
Eyetrack III(Speaking of design)
  • We spend about one second per line.
  • For whatever reason, the left side is generally
    read more than the right.
  • Short paragraphs and introductory paragraphs are
    read more frequently.
  • If you want people to readnot scanconsider
    smaller type. The study found that large/header
    type promotes skimming.
  • Next slide Red shows where people focused the
    most green shows what they scanned or ignored.

24
Eyetrack III(Speaking of design)
FURTHER READING EyeTrack III Keep
these ideas in mind when you create your Web
sites.
25
Sampling of well designed sites
  • It can be a matter of opinion, but theres some
    consensus on
  • Sites that know who their parents are.
  • The New York Times
  • MSNBC
  • USA Today
  • Readable sites
  • Christian Science Monitor Balance, easy on eyes
  • CNN Many headers, few blurbsgives you an idea
    of top story content in seconds

26
And on the other end of things
  • Some call it the worst designed site on the Web
    others say it cant be for real.
  • Gird yer loins, class. I bring you
    havenworks.com
  • Why do I torment you so?
  • Most news organizations have learned by now that
    a good web designer can go a long way.
  • Many designs work, many dontit depends on your
    audience and the kinds of information youre
    trying to convey. In this case, youre not
    reaching anyone.
  • I dont want your sites to look like this.

27
Writing for the Web
  • Almost everything you do in this classincluding
    your first piecewill incorporate text.
  • Although weve talked about text in brief
    already, here are a few rules you should keep in
    mind as you go through this course

28
Writing for the Web
  • Rules for Internet Writing
  • Keep paragraphs short (one topic)
  • Use informative subheads
  • Hyperlink to other articles/sites youre
    referencing
  • Most news sites do this by linking words like
    Iraq to lists of related articles. (Example.)
  • Use bulleted lists (if you need them) to break
    things up
  • Key point Long blocks of type are deadly!

29
Writing for the Web
  • Internet Writing is a combination of print and
    broadcast
  • Like print
  • Inverted pyramid style preferred
  • Expandable news hole
  • Write to be read rather than heard.
  • Like Broadcast
  • Conversational tone
  • Short, declarative sentences / Simple words
  • Immediacy is important (people check the Web for
    breaking news)

30
Writing for the Web
  • Improving scanability / readability
  • Highlight key words and phrases (this can include
    hyperlinking important phrases for context)
  • Use subheads to break up text and divide story
  • Use meaningful linksif you can summarize an
    issue succinctly by offering a link for more
    info, do.
  • Make it timely and relevant
  • On Breaking stories, get info out fast
  • Add on as story develops
  • Add timestamps so you dont have to rewrite

31
Todays assignments
  • Create a Web site at sites.google.com
  • Tutorial
  • Sites can be customized--examples
  • Alexanders portfolio -- Portfolio
  • Raven Bradley Film -- Claires Gallery
  • For next week/Feb 2. Report on an issue of
    interest to you and post it on your Web
    site using the guidance on format and content
    discussed in class.
  • E-mail me your site URL and bring a print out of
    your article to class. Prepare to discuss it.
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