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NOAA Response to: One Ocean, One Health: NOAA in the Lead

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Title: NOAA Response to: One Ocean, One Health: NOAA in the Lead


1
NOAA Response to One Ocean, One Health NOAA in
the Lead
  • A Report from the NOAA Science Advisory Boards
    Ocean Health Working Group

Paul A. Sandifer, Ph.D. Senior Science Advisor to
the NOAA Administrator NOS Senior Scientist for
Coastal Ecology
March 9, 2011
2
Background
  • The OHWG was convened by the SAB in March 2009,
    at the request of the NOS, to review and provide
    advice on how to better define NOAAs role and
    actions to enhance ongoing and future human and
    organism health-related science and management
    efforts.

3
OHWG Charge Questions
  • What are NOAAs unique and important scientific
    roles in addressing ocean health issues?
  • 2) What are the right ocean health science
    questions, products and services for NOAA?
  • 3) Are there additional ocean health science
    issues that should be included in the NOAA
    research portfolio? If so, what are these?
  • 4) What are the appropriate steps for NOAA to
    incorporate and advance ocean health as part of
    its core mission?
  • 5) How could NOAA more systematically develop
    ocean health products and services to enhance
    ecosystem, organism, human, and community health?
  • 6) How can NOAA better integrate among its major
    programs, including activities conducted within
    the agency and those supported in the external
    community, to better define and assess ocean
    health issues?

4
OHWG Membership
  • Dr. Lorraine Backer, Centers for Disease Control
  • Dr. Daniel Baden, University of North Carolina at
    Wilmington
  • Dr. Shannon Briggs, Michigan Dept. of
    Environmental Quality
  • Dr. Thomas Chandler, University of South Carolina
  • Dr. Rita Colwell , University of Maryland
  • Dr. David Fluharty, University of Washington
  • Dr. Frances Gulland, The Marine Mammal Center
  • Dr. Frank Kudrna, Jr., Kudrna Associates
  • Dr. David Letson, University of Miami
  • Dr. Carolyn Thoroughgood, University of Delaware
  • Dr. Stephen Weisberg, Southern California Coastal
    Water Research Project (Chair)

5
SAB Action On OHWG Report
  • At our March 2010 meeting the SAB approved the
    OHWG Report as advice to NOAA on implementation
    of its critical engagements in human health and
    organism health -- both within NOAA and among its
    many Partners. NOAA has a clear leadership role
    based on its unique qualifications to monitor
    certain aspects of the marine environment and to
    provide forecasts of conditions that potentially
    affect human and organism health. 
  • The NOAA SAB encourages you Dr. Lubchenco and
    NOAA to take these recommendations seriously and
    to implement them as soon as possible. It is
    pointed out that these concerns belong in NOAAs
    Next Generation strategic planning at the
    national level as well as at the regional level.

6
From OHWG Report, page 11
7
OHWG Findings
  • 1 There is urgent need for action.
  • 2 NOAA is well positioned to meet this need.
  • 3 NOAA has a diverse health portfolio, but the
    pieces need to be linked together to form a more
    comprehensive, coordinated program.
  • 4 NOAA needs to better quantify and communicate
    the benefits of its investments in health-related
    activities.

8
OHWG Recommendations
  • 1 NOAA should establish health protection,
    preservation and enhancement as an agency-wide
    goal.
  • 2 NOAA should develop a comprehensive plan for
    its health program.
  • 3 NOAA should focus initially on several
    priority projects.
  • - Forecasts of impending threats
  • - Surveillance systems
  • - Climate change effects
  • - Health benefits from the sea

9
Rec. 1 Health Should Be An Agency-Wide Goal
  • NOAA should acknowledge that identification and
    protection of ocean-health linkages are critical
    to the agencys core mission and commit at the
    highest administrative level to a national
    leadership role appropriate to the agency unique
    skill sets and capabilities. NOAAs Next
    Generation Strategic Plan provides an opportunity
    for the agency to incorporate health concerns
    into the agencys mission in a meaningful way.
    The newly formed Climate Service will also allow
    NOAA to highlight products useful to individuals
    who must make decisions on the long-term effects
    of climate change on health of humans and
    organisms.

10
Action1.1 Health in the NGSP
  • Connections between human health and well being
    and the health and resilience of natural
    ecosystems noted throughout the NGSP
  • Incorporates stronger focus on health risks and
    benefits than any previous strategic plan, with
    four times more use of terms such as human and
    public health, health and healthy

11
Action 1.1 Health in the NGSP
  • Four overarching goals
  • 1. Climate Adaptation Mitigation
  • 2. Weather-Ready Nation
  • 3. Healthy Oceans
  • 4. Resilient Coastal Communities Economies
  • Health references in all four but strongest in 2
    and 4.

12
Action 1.1 Health in the NGSP
  • Weather-Ready Nation NOAA has unique ability to
    combine weather, climate, ocean and coastal
    information to develop integrated environmental
    predictions to improve community and ecosystem
    health.
  • Resilient Coastal Communities NOAA will examine
    transport and fate of chemicals, nutrients,
    sediments, pathogens, harmful algal blooms,
    toxins and marine debris and predict health
    threats to marine ecosystems and humans.

13
Action 1.1 Health in the NGSP
  • Healthy Oceans NOAA will reduce health hazards
    to humans and animals from seafood contaminated
    with HAB toxins, chemicals, and pathogens and
    improve recognition of health benefits from
    consumption of high quality seafood.
  • Science Technology Enterprise NOAAs
    capabilities in environmental monitoring,
    modeling, and prediction would support
    development of ocean health early warning
    systems.

14
Action 1.2 Health in the AGM
  • NOAA will work with other agencies and partners
    to increase understanding of and ways to mitigate
    DWH spill impacts on human health and well being.
  • NOAA should pursue capabilities to forecast
    high-impact events such as tornados, hurricanes,
    floods, air quality, winter storms, tsunami, and
    ocean health-related threats from harmful algal
    blooms, chemical contaminants, and pathogens.

15
Action 1.3 Strengthen Strategic Partnerships
  • NOAA has developed new or enhanced partnerships
    in four key health areas
  • One Health
  • Public Health
  • Climate Change
  • DWH Spill Health Issues

16
Action 1.3 Strengthen Strategic Partnerships
  • One Health
  • Re-invigorated cross-NOAA One Health team
  • One Health approach in climate adaptation
    planning
  • One Health integrated into USGCRP strategic
    planning
  • Leading interagency One Health discussions via
    IWG-4H
  • Working with WHO, CDC , NIH, academic and state
    partners re zoonotic diseases
  • Engaging with USGS, USFWS, USDA on shared data
    systems displays for monitoring fish wildlife
    health
  • In discussion with USAID re integrating ocean,
    climate, marine mammal health data into their
    global program

17
Action 1.3 Strengthen Strategic Partnerships
  • Public Health
  • Local, state and national public health agencies
    including CDC and NIH within the DHHS and APHA
  • MOU with NIH Fogarty Intl Center for
    biodiscovery work
  • Broad MOU with CDC for research, training, data
    sharing, etc.
  • NWS-CDC joint messaging effort re health issues
  • NWS, WHO and OHHI integrate NOAA data into WHO
    global information system for health forecasts
  • OHHI and WHO on climate change impact on water
    facilities
  • OHHI and WHO on graduate training opportunities
  • Sea Grant connecting NOAA and partner health
    researchers to public health community
  • Numerous other activities/discussions involving
    NOS, NWS, OAR, NMFS, and with many state,
    federal, and international agencies and the
    academic community.

18
Action 1.3 Strengthen Strategic Partnerships
  • Climate Change
  • National assessments of climate change impacts,
    including health advice to DHHS and others
  • NOAA OHHI co-led development of IWG on Climate
    Change and Human Health it produced 1st
    comprehensive report on research needs related to
    human health effects of climate change. formal
    IWGCCH established under USGCRP, with NOAA as
    co-chair
  • NOAA OHHI, NWS, and NESDIS partnering with
    CDC-sponsored Environmental Public Health
    Tracking Network with states, including coastal
    health threats and heat waves
  • Chaired or co-chaired numerous climate change-OHH
    sessions at national science meetings (AAAS,
    APHA, NCSE)
  • NOAA MMHSRP partnering with federal, state,
    tribal and academic partners re climate change
    effects on marine mammals
  • OAR established RISA on climate and urban health
    numerous activities by Sea Grant on climate
    adaptation

19
Action 1.3 Strategic Partnerships
  • DWH Oil Spill Response Health Issues
  • NOAA has engaged broadly in seafood safety,
    marine mammal health assessments, coordination
    with NIEHS on longitudinal study of 55,000 people
    involved in response and clean-up, and ensuring
    NOAA maintains readiness to respond to health
    issues that may arise for natural or man-made
    disasters.
  • Involved in multiple partner work regarding
    analytic methods for dispersants and other
    contaminants and impacts to health risks
  • NOAA proposed integrated ecosystem marine
    mammal human health risk assessment
  • Sea Grant has worked across the spectrum to
    engage and inform partners, stakeholders,
    constituents and the public regarding a
    wide-range of potential spill-related
    environmental, animal, and human health issues

20
2. Comprehensive Plan For NOAAs Health Program
  • NOAA should develop a comprehensive plan for its
    health programs that
  • Ties its health efforts to other federal agencies
    with complementary skills in environmental and
    public health
  • Is based on a systematic risk characterization of
    health benefits and threats
  • Includes transitioning of research to
    applications
  • Creates a coordinating entity for health-related
    efforts across the agency and
  • Provides funding for the OHHI commensurate with
    the plan (initial recommendation of level
    authorized in OHH Act).

21
Action 2.1 Develop Comprehensive One Ocean,
One Health Plan for NOAA
  • Step 1 Engaged effectively in ongoing planning
    efforts including the Presidents National Ocean
    Policy, the NGSP, the AGM, strategic plans in
    several Line Offices, and the IWGCCHH. Resulted
    in specific health priorities identified for
    NOAA.
  • Step 2 Re-invigorated cross-NOAA One Health
    Working Group.
  • Step 3 (Proposed) Formalize the One Health
    Working Group, led by the NOS Senior Scientist
    and OHHI, as a primary coordination and
    communication mechanism.

22
Action 2.2 Characterize Ocean Health Risks and
Benefits
  • Proposed Fund Distinguished Scholar(s) to
    characterize risk, benefits, economics.
  • Proposed One or more of the OHHI Centers of
    Excellence undertake regional pilot study(ies) to
    acquire economic and risk data.
  • Proposed Work with internal and external
    partners and NOAAs Social Science Committee to
    leverage resources to support.
  • Build on pilots and partnerships advanced by
    other LOs for ocean-health related research,
    communication, and services.

23
Action 2.3 Use the OHHI for Cross NOAA
Coordination
  • OHHI has specific authorization under the OHH Act
    of 2004 for health activities, both within NOAA
    and with external partners
  • Has strong history of effective cross-NOAA
    operations and partnering
  • Widely recognized within NOAA, by other agencies,
    and in academia as credible, dependable partner
    and effective leader
  • Overseen at a relatively high level
  • Improve administrative efficiency by aligning
    with National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

24
Action 2.4 Increase Funding for the OHHI
  • The Presidents FY12 budget proposal includes a
    significant increase for the OHHI from 1M to
    2M

25
3. Near-Term Focus on Priority Projects
  • Forecasts of impending threats NOAA should
    extend its skills in forecasting to predict
    emerging diseases, pathogens, toxins, and
    contaminants likely to have an impact on health.
  • Surveillance systems for pathogens, contaminants
    and toxins NOAA should be the lead agency for
    surveillance of ocean organismal physiological
    health, as well as mitigation of factors causing
    change in health.
  • Climate change effects on health NOAA should
    identify the ocean-related health impacts from
    climate change and characterize the impacts of
    climate change on water supplies.
  • Health benefits from the sea NOAA should make
    human health benefits from the ocean more
    accessible by encouraging and supporting the
    development of healthful seafood and other
    ocean-derived products including nutritional
    additives and pharmaceuticals.

26
3.1 Forecasts
  • Forecasts of impending threats NOAA should
    extend its skills in forecasting to predict
    emerging diseases, pathogens, toxins, and
    contaminants likely to have an impact on health.
  • The NOAA response document lists numerous
    projects dealing with ecological forecasts,
    sentinel indicators such as dolphins and tidal
    creeks, and development of marine sensors related
    to a variety of ocean health threats including
    harmful algal blooms, pathogens, and chemical
    contaminants in all regions of the country
    including the Gulf of Mexico, the Great Lakes,
    the Northeast, the Mid- and South Atlantic, and
    the Pacific Northwest.

27
3.2 Surveillance Systems
  • 2. Surveillance systems for pathogens,
    contaminants and toxins NOAA should be the lead
    agency for surveillance of ocean organismal
    physiological health, as well as mitigation of
    factors causing change in health.
  • The NOAA Response numerous examples of
    surveillance strategy development by several NOAA
    entities in NOS, NWS, NMFS, OAR and in
    partnership with the CDC, NIH, NIEHS, Department
    of Veterans Affairs, WHO, GEOSS, USAID, and
    academia.
  • NOAA is also developing enhanced diagnostic
    capabilities to distinguish between Leptospirosis
    (an infectious disease) and domoic acid poisoning
    (a HAB toxin) in sea lions, identifying DNA
    markers for ciaguatoxin (another HAB toxin)
    exposure, supporting a range of sensor
    development projects in NOS, OAR, and the
    external community, planning several workshops to
    identify health research, data and other needs
    and to support the National Climate Assessment,
    responding to marine mammal health emergencies
    and seafood safety issues, and much more!

28
3.3 Climate Change
  • 3. Climate change effects on health NOAA
    should identify the ocean-related health impacts
    from climate change and characterize the
    impacts of climate change on water supplies.
  • Examples of NOAAs growing interest in climate
    change impacts on ocean health
  • NWS - emphasis on water resources, drought
    prediction, and water cycle to improve abilities
    to forecast and protect ecosystem and human
    health.
  • OAR - effects of ocean acidification on the
    health of marine organisms and associated
    implications for humans.
  • NMFS - potential increases in duration of HAB
    events due to climate change.
  • NOS and OAR - integrating climate change
    scenarios into storm-water runoff models to
    evaluate effects on health of coastal ecosystems
    including humans.
  • All NOAA - Implementation of the National Ocean
    Policy will necessitate that NOAA address climate
    change effects related to ocean condition and
    health risks.

29
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3.4 Health Benefits
  • Health benefits from the sea NOAA should make
    human health benefits from the ocean more
    accessible by encouraging and supporting the
    development of healthful seafood and other
    ocean-derived products including nutritional
    additives and pharmaceuticals.
  • With the exception of seafood-safety related
    efforts, especially during the DWH spill, this is
    an area that has received less attention during
    the last couple of years due to funding
    constraints. However, the OHHI has funded several
    small grants in the biodiscovery arena and has
    recently partnered with the NIH Fogarty Centers
    International Conservation and Bioprospecting
    Group to leverage our limited resources with
    those of other agencies. OAR is supporting a new
    CI for Ocean Exploration, Research, and
    Technology that is also likely to include some
    biodiscovery work, and the OER has contributed to
    biodiscovery science.

32
3.4 Health Benefits
  • Health benefits from the sea NOAA should make
    human health benefits from the ocean more
    accessible by encouraging and supporting the
    development of healthful seafood and other
    ocean-derived products including nutritional
    additives and pharmaceuticals.
  • With the exception of DWH-related
    seafood-safety efforts, this area has received
    less attention recently due to funding
    constraints.
  • OHHI has funded several small biodiscovery
    grants
  • OHHI partnered with the NIH Fogarty Centers
    International Conservation and Bioprospecting
    Group to leverage limited resources
  • OAR is supporting a new CI for Ocean
    Exploration, Research, and Technology that is
    also likely to include some biodiscovery work
  • OER and Sea Grant have contributed to
    biodiscovery science.

33
Summary
  • NOAA was pleased with the guidance provided by
    the SABs OHWG and is very actively responding to
    its recommendations. Results include
  • The NGSP and AGM incorporate strong health
    references
  • OHHI recommended for increase in FY12 Presidents
    Budget
  • Established cross-NOAA One Health Working Group
  • Substantially increased and enhanced health
    partnerships demonstrated NOAA leadership in
    numerous forums
  • Conducting a broad suite of projects in
    OHWG-recommended areas
  • Proposing to undertake risk characterization and
    economic studies
  • Endorsed the OHHI as internal coordinating lead
    for NOAAs portfolio of health programs,
  • Initiating development of a comprehensive One
    NOAA, One Health plan via workshop modeled on
    the successful Science Workshop

34
Thanks!
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