Describe the westward growth of the United States, including the emerging concept of Manifest Destiny leading to conflict with Native Americans. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Describe the westward growth of the United States, including the emerging concept of Manifest Destiny leading to conflict with Native Americans. PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 3b76b6-MjdkO



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Describe the westward growth of the United States, including the emerging concept of Manifest Destiny leading to conflict with Native Americans.

Description:

Western Migration, Industrialization, Urbanization, and Immigration Describe the westward growth of the United States, including the emerging concept of Manifest ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:375
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 30
Provided by: brookwoodh7
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Describe the westward growth of the United States, including the emerging concept of Manifest Destiny leading to conflict with Native Americans.


1
Western Migration, Industrialization,
Urbanization, and Immigration
  • Describe the westward growth of the United
    States, including the emerging concept of
    Manifest Destiny leading to conflict with Native
    Americans.
  • Describe the impact of the railroads in the
    development of the West, including the
    transcontinental railroad, and the use of Chinese
    labor,
  • Describe the growth of the western population and
    its impact on Native Americans with reference to
    Sitting Bull and Wounded Knee,
  • Examine the problems of American farmers,
    solutions offered by populism in the late 19th
    Century and identify the major goals and
    achievements of the reformers

2
The New Industrial Age 1876 - 1900
3
Economic Wheel
  • BAD
  • Slow
  • Less Jobs
  • Less Opportunity
  • GOOD
  • Fast
  • More Jobs
  • More Opportunity

Hands OFF v. Hands ON
4
Chapter 15 READING SHEETS
Chapter 15 Immigrants and Urbanization Section 1
The New immigrants Between 1870 and 1920,
approximately _____ million Europeans arrived in
the United States. Before 1890, most had come
from countries in western and northern Europe.
However, increasing numbers began to come from
__________ and ________________ Europe. In 1907
alone, about a million arrived from Italy,
Austria-Hungary, and Russia. Many left to escape
religious persecution (whole villages of Jews
were driven out of Russia under Pogroms) and
others left because of rising population which
resulted in scarcity of land and
jobs. ________________ immigrants will arrive on
the west coast in smaller numbers. Between 1851
and 1883 _________ arrived. Many came to seek
fortunes after the discovery of Gold in
California. They helped build the __________,
they turned to farming, mining, domestic services
and business, although Chinese immigration was
sharply limited by a ____________________________
in 1882. In 1884, the Japanese government allowed
_______________ planters to recruit Japanese
workers.
5
Industrialization, Urbanization, and Immigration
  • Analyze important consequences of
    American industrial growth.
  • Identify the Knights of Labor, American
    Federation of Labor, and Samuel Gompers,
  • Describe the Homestead Strike, Haymarket Square,
    and the 1894 Pullman strike as examples of
    industrial unrest,
  • Describe Ellis Island, the change in immigrants'
    origins to southern and eastern Europe, and the
    impact of this change on urban America,
  • Explain the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and
    anti-Asian immigration sentiment on the West
    Coast,
  • Evaluate the effects of increased urbanization,
    including overcrowding, pollution, poverty,
    crime, but also, improvement in quality of life
    due to the availability of resources,

6
Ch. 14 the New Industrial Age
  • Big Business Labor
  • Andrew Carnegie
  • Vertical Integration
  • Horizontal Integration
  • Social Darwinism
  • John D. Rockefeller
  • Robber Barons
  • Standard Oil
  • Sherman Anti-Trust Act
  • Working Conditions-Unions
  • American Federation of Labor
  • Samuel Gompers
  • Industrial Unionism
  • Eugene Debs
  • Socialism / Communism
  • Haymarket Affair
  • Homestead Strike
  • Pullman Strike
  • Mother Jones (Miners)
  • The Expansion of Industry
  • Edwin L. Drake
  • Bessemer Process
  • Thomas Alva Edison
  • Alexander Graham Bell
  • Christopher Sholes
  • The Age of Railroads
  • Transcontinental Railroad
  • Central Pacific Union Pacific
  • George Pullman
  • Credit Mobilier Scandal
  • Granger Laws (Munn v. Illinois)
  • Interstate Commerce Act in 1887

7
Industrialization, Urbanization, Immigration
  • Describe the economic, social and geographic
    impact of the growth of big business and
    technological innovations in the United States
    after Reconstruction.
  • Describe technological inventions, such as the
    telephone, automobile, airplane, and Thomas
    Edison's electric light bulb and phonograph, and
    their impact on American life
  • Explain the importance of the growing economic
    disparity between the North and South through an
    examination of population, functioning railroads,
    and industrial output
  • Explain the impact of the railroads on
    industries, such as steel, and on the
    organization of big business,
  • Identify John D. Rockefeller, Sr. and the
    Standard Oil Company, Andrew Carnegie and
    Carnegie Steel, and the rise of trusts and
    monopolies, to include horizontal and vertical
    integration,
  • Identify the Knights of Labor, American
    Federation of Labor, and Samuel Gompers,
  • Describe the Homestead Strike, Haymarket Square,
    and the 1894 Pullman strike as examples of
    industrial unrest,

8
Capitalist Ideas
  • In the early 1800s, the middle-class owners of
    railroads, factories, and mines began supporting
    laissez-faire
    economics ?
  • They believed that freedom from government
    controls would mean a growing economy with
    material progress for all people.

9
Adam Smith
  • Industrial leaders relied on the ideas of Adam
    Smith, a Scottish economist who set down the
    workings of a laissez-faire economy. ?
  • In The Wealth of Nations (1776), Smith stated
    that an economy works best when the natural
    forces of supply and demand operate without
    government interference.

10
  • As the Industrial Revolution gathered momentum
    and spread throughout the world, Smiths ideas
    profoundly influenced economic thought and
    practice.

6 of 26
11
GROWTH IN AMERICA
CAUSES
EFFECTS
12
( TECHNOLOGY
Science applied to Business )
  • the wealth of nation is based upon (equation)
  • 1-NATURAL RESOURCES,
    Oil, Coal, Iron, Water
  • 2-GOVERNMENT
    support for business
    development
  • a growing URBAN population that provided
    3 -CHEAP LABOR and
  • 4-NEW markets for selling
  • 5- new PRODUCTS.
  • New Markets Growth New Jobs

13
The New Industrial Age 1876 - 1900
14
( TECHNOLOGY Science applied to Business )
  • Telephone
    (Alexander Graham Bell)
    American Telegraph Telephone
  • Electric Power
    Thomas A. Edison (Light Bulb)
  • (Central Power Station)
    Westinghouse-Alternating Current
  • Impact of Electricity on daily life
  • Bessemer Process (STEEL) mass
    production easier, cheaper
  • Impact on New Products / New Lifestyles

15
  • By the 1920s, the United States have become the
    leading INDUSTRIAL power in the world. This
    immense industrial boom was due to
  • the wealth of nation is based upon (equation)
  • 1-NATURAL RESOURCES, Oil, Coal, Iron, Water
  • 2-GOVERNMENT support for business development
  • a growing URBAN population that provided
    3 -CHEAP LABOR and
  • 4-NEW markets for selling 5- new PRODUCTS.
  • New Markets Growth New Jobs
  • In 1859, EDWIN L. DRAKE successfully used a steam
    engine to drill for OIL in Titusville, PA.
  • This breakthrough started an OIL boom. GASOLINE,
    a byproduct of the refining process, was
    originally thrown away, but after automobiles
    became popular, it became the most important part
    of oil.

16
  • In 1887, prospectors discovered IRON ORE deposits
    more than 100 miles long and up to 3 miles wide
    in the Mesabi Range in MINNESOTA. At the same
    time, COAL production skyrocketed from 33 million
    tons to more than 250 million tons.
  • IRON is a dense metal, but is soft and tends to
    break down and rust. Removing the carbon produces
    lighter, more flexible and rust resistant metal -
    STEEL. All that was needed was make it more
    readily available was a CHEAP manufacturing
    process.
  • The BESSEMER process was developed by British
    manufacturer HENRY BESSEMER and American
    ironmaker WILLIAM KELLY in 1850. In this age of
    rapid change and INNOVATION, even this process
    was bettered in the 1860s.
  • It was eventually replaced by the OPEN-HEARTH
    process, allowing manufacturers to produce
    quality steel from SCRAP METAL as well as raw
    materials.

17
  • The RAILROAD with thousands of miles of track
    became the biggest customer for steel, but
    inventors soon found new uses for it.
  • JOSEPH GLIDDENS barbed wire and McCORMICK and
    DEERES farm machines helped transform the plains
    into the food producer of the world.
  • 1 of the most remarkable structures was the
    BROOKLYN BRIDGE. Completed in 1883, it spanned
    1,595 feet of the East River in NY City.
  • WILLIAM BARON JENNY will design the first
    skyscraper. With a steel frame to support the
    weight, however, architects could build as high
    as they wanted.

18
  • In 1876, THOMAS ALVA EDISON became a pioneer on
    the new INDUSTRIAL frontier when he established
    the worlds first research laboratory in MENLO
    PARK, NJ.
  • There he perfected the INCANDECENT LIGHT BULB -
    patented in 1880 and later an entire system for
    producing and distributing ELECTRICAL POWER.
  • Another inventor GEORGE WESTINGHOUSE along with
    Edison, added innovations that made ELECTRICITY
    safer and less expensive.
  • AC-DC (Alternating Current v. Direct Current)

19
  • This harnessing changed the nature of business in
    America. By 1890, ELECTRICITY ran numerous
    machines. This inexpensive convenient source of
    energy soon became available in homes and spurred
    the invention of TIME-SAVING APPLIANCES.
  • ELECTRIC STREET CARS made urban travel cheap and
    efficient and also promoted the outward growth of
    cities.
  • It also allowed manufacturers to locate their
    plants WHEREVER THEY WANTED, which allowed
    industry to grow like never before.

20
  • CHRISTOPHER SHOLES invented the typewriter in
    1867 and changed the world of work. Next to the
    light bulb, however, perhaps the most dramatic
    invention was the TELEPHONE unveiled by Thomas
    Watson and ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL in 1876.
  • It opened the way for worldwide communication.
    These inventions also affected office work and
    created new jobs for women. Although women made
    up less than (FIVE) 5 of all office workers in
    1870, by 1870 they accounted for nearly 40 of
    clerical workers.

21
  • It also impacted on factory work. Women had
    previously sewn clothing BY HAND, but with
    industrialization clothing will be
    MASS-PRODUCED in factories,
    creating a need for garment workers, many of whom
    will be women.
  • The countys expanding urban population provided
    a vast potential for new INVENTIONS and products
    of the late 1880s.

22
  • By 1856, railroads extended west to MISSISSIPPI,
    and three years later they crossed the MISSOURI
    River. Just over a decade later, the
    CENTRAL PACIFIC UNION
    PACIFIC met at PROMONTORY POINT Utah on May, 10,
    1869.
  • A GOLDEN SPIKE marked the spanning of the nation
    by the first TRANSCONTINENTAL RAILROAD. The
    railroads brought the dream of available land,
    adventure and a fresh start for many Americans,
    made possible by the harsh lives of railroad
    workers.
  • The CENTRAL PACIFIC will employ thousands of
    Chinese immigrants, while the UNION PACIFIC
    employed thousands of Irish immigrants, out of
    work Civil War veterans to lay tracks across the
    treacherous terrain.

23
  • Though linked in space, each community still
    operated on its own time. In 1869, to remedy
    this problem, C. F. DOWD proposed that the
    earths surface by divided into 24 time zones,
    one for each hour of the day.
  • Under this plan, the United States would contain
    FOUR (4) zones, EASTERN, CENTRAL, MOUNTAIN,
    PACIFIC. Finally on November 18, 1883, railroad
    crews and towns across the country synchronized
    their watches.

24
  • In 1884 an international conference set worldwide
    time zones. The rapid growth of railroad line
    also fostered the growth of TOWNS, helped
    establish NEW MARKETS, and offered rich
    opportunities for both visionaries and
    profiteers.
  • As a part of a nationwide network of supplies and
    markets, individual towns began to SPECIALIZE in
    particular products.
  • CHICAGO soon became known for its stockyards and
    MINNEAPOLIS for its grain industries.

25
  • In 1880, GEORGE PULLMAN built a factory for
    manufacturing sleepers and railroad cars on the
    Illinois prairie. Pullman created his company
    town out of the desire for control and profit. In
    some other railroad magnates, these desires
    turned into self-serving corruption.
  • In one of the most infamous schemes, stockholders
    in the UNION PACIFIC R.R. formed, in 1864 a
    construction company called CREDIT MOBLIER. A
    congressional investigation of the company
    eventually found that the officers had taken up
    to 23 million in stocks, bonds and cash.

26
  • Farmers were especially affected by corruption in
    the railroads. The GRANGERS - members of a
    farmers organization founded in 1867 began
    demanding governmental control over the railroad
    industry.
  • In response to these abuses by the railroads, the
    GRANGERS took political action. They sponsored
    state and political
    candidates, elected legislators,
    and successfully pressed for laws
    to protect their
    interests.

27
  • In 1877, in the case of MUNN v. ILLINOIS, the
    Supreme Court upheld the Granger laws by a vote
    of 7-2, that established maximum freight and
    passenger rates and prohibited discrimination.
  • In 1886,the Supreme Court, however, will rule
    that a state could not set rates on interstate
    commerce, Congress passed the INTERSTATE
    COMMERCE ACT in 1887.
  • This act reestablished the right of the federal
    government to supervise railroad activities and
    established a FIVE (5) member Interstate
    Commerce Commission (ICC)

28
  • Section 3 Big Business and Labor
  • Andrew CARNEGIE rise from rags to riches, along
    with his passion for supporting charities made
    him a model of the American success story. He
    entered the STEEL business in 1873 after touring
    a British steel mill and witnessing the awesome
    spectacle of the Bessemer process in Action.
  • His success was due in part to management
    practices that he initiated and that soon became
    widespread. First, he continually searched for
    ways to make better products more CHEAPLY Second,
    he attracted talented people by offering them
    STOCK in his company.

29
  • He will attempt to control as much of the steel
    industry as possible by maintaining VERTICAL
    INTEGRATION, a process in which he bought out his
    suppliers coal fields, iron mines, ore
    freighters and railroad lines in order to the
    raw materials and transportation systems.
  • He also attempted to buy out competing steel
    producers. This process of HORIZONTAL INTEGRATION
    companies producing similar products merge. By
    the time he sold his business in 1902, his
    company produced by far the largest portion of
    the nations steel.
About PowerShow.com