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Be Prepared: Emergency Planning for All Hazards, All People, All Stages

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Be Prepared: Emergency Planning for All Hazards, All People, All Stages L. Irene Bowen U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division Deputy Chief, Disability ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Be Prepared: Emergency Planning for All Hazards, All People, All Stages


1
Be Prepared Emergency Planning for All Hazards,
All People, All Stages
  • L. Irene Bowen
  • U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division
  • Deputy Chief, Disability Rights Section
  • Emily Singer
  • Director
  • Disability Support Services
  • The Catholic University of America

2
Considering All People
3
All Hazards When You Least Expect Them
  • 9/11
  • Katrina and Rita
  • California wildfires
  • Virginia Tech shootings

4
(No Transcript)
5
Learning Outcomes
  • Acquire general background information
  • Understand basic legal responsibilities
  • Explore resources
  • Survey means of communicating with people with
    disabilities
  • Learn ways of working with others to ensure that
    every phase provides for people with disabilities

6
Outline
  • Legal Responsibilities
  • Types of Emergencies
  • Stages of Preparedness and Response
  • Unusual Challenges
  • Best Practices and Tips for Preparation
  • Discussion and Final Thoughts

7
Legal Responsibilities
  • Colleges/universities
  • Americans with Disabilities Act title II
    (public) title III (private)
  • Section 504
  • Employment title I
  • State/local governments (title II and Section
    504)
  • Red Cross and others (title III)
  • Equal access to all services and information

8
Types of Emergencies
  • Natural disasters, weather (hurricane, tornado,
    earthquake, wildfire, flood)
  • Localized fires, bomb threats
  • Chemical emergencies (gas leak, chlorine, nerve
    agents, radiation, nuclear blasts)
  • Explosions
  • Shooting incidents
  • Bioterrorism (anthrax, plague)
  • Pandemic

9
Stages of Preparedness and Response
  • One Planning
  • Two Notification
  • Three Evacuation
  • Four Transportation
  • Five Sheltering
  • Six Returning and Recovery

10
Stage One Planning
  • Consider the possibilities
  • types of hazards (e.g., hurricanes, fires,
    chemical contamination)
  • events that cannot be specifically anticipated
  • Emphasize preparedness
  • individual
  • institution

11
Stage One Planning (Contd)
  • Consider the needs of
  • Students
  • Staff
  • Faculty
  • Administrators

12
Stage One Planning (Contd)
  • Consider all disabilities people who
  • Use mobility aids
  • Have limited stamina
  • Use oxygen or respirators
  • Have vision or hearing impairments
  • Have cognitive disabilities
  • Have mental illnesses
  • Have other disabilities

13
Stage Two Notification
  • Identifying individuals with disabilities a
    registry?
  • Must be confidential, current, available
  • The reality becoming disabled in an emergency

14
Stage Two Notification (Contd)
  • The reality becoming disabled in an emergency
  • Ensuring notification to all

15
Notification to All
Ronna Gradus, Miami Herald
16
Stage Three Evacuation
17
Stage ThreeEvacuation (Contd)
  • Exiting buildings

18
Danger no waiting area outside path of travel
19
Area of Rescue Assistance/Refuge
20
Stage Three Evacuation(Contd)
  • Identifying evacuation routes and destination
    points

21
Stage Four Transportation
  • Ensuring transportation for those without vehicles


22
Stage Four Transportation (Contd)
  • Providing transportation that is
    accessible to all

23
Stage Five Sheltering
  • Sheltering in place
  • Sheltering off campus
  • Providing information to people with hearing,
    vision, and cognitive impairments

24
Stage Five Sheltering (Contd)
  • Campus used as public shelter

25
Stage Five Sheltering (Contd)
  • Physical access

26
Access to all spaces
27
(No Transcript)
28
Appropriate Signage
29
Stage Five Sheltering (Contd)
  • Nondiscriminatory policies

30
Stage Five Sheltering (Contd)
  • Access to services

31
Stage Five Sheltering
  • Electrical power

32
Stage Five Sheltering
  • Access to medication

33
Stage Six Returning and Recovery
  • Needs of individuals when returning to campus
  • Physical access (e.g., what if some buildings are
    no longer usable)
  • Policy matters

34
Unusual Challenges
  • Pandemic/ Bird Flu
  • Norovirus Outbreak
  • Shooting Incident

35
Unusual Challenges
  • Pandemic/ Bird flu
  • Building campus awareness as a DS office
  • Anticipating possible scenarios the phases of a
    pandemic
  • Preparedness checklist for institutions and
    individuals/families

36
Pandemic/ Bird Flu
  • Planning for needs of people with disabilities
  • Continuing operations if quarantine or social
    distancing is required
  • Notification of plans, procedures, continuing
    developments

37
Pandemic/ Bird Flu
  • Access to medical care and medications
    (stockpiling?)
  • Sheltering in place
  • Further information
  • www.pandemicflu.gov
  • www.who.int

38
Unusual Challenges
  • Norovirus Outbreak
  • Things to do to stay germ free
  • Bathrooms
  • Eating areas
  • Offices (telephones, computers, desks, door
    handles)

39
Unusual Challenges Violent Incident
  • Shooting Incident/Violence
  • Notification
  • Emotional impact on others
  • Coordination between Counseling Center, Health
    Services, Disability Services

40
Best Practices and Tips for Preparation
  • Be involved with planners
  • Ensure consideration of people with disabilities
  • Train individuals with disabilities, responders,
    others
  • Practice
  • Get feedback
  • Revise plans and procedures

41
Resources from schools
  • University of Virginia http//www.virginia.edu/p
    andemic/
  • University of Chicago http//provost.uchicago.edu
    /initiatives/disabilities.shtml

42
National Resources
  • Department of Justice
  • www.ada.gov
  • (watch for new PCA Tool Kit chapter)
  • ADA Guide for Local Governments
    www.ada.gov/emergencyprep.htm

43
National Resources (Contd)
  • www.NOD.org
  • www.disabilitypreparedness.gov
  • www.espfocus.org
  • The National Fire Protection Association
    Evacuation Planning Guide for People with
    Disabilities. http//www.nfpa.org

44
Resources from AHEAD
  • Adapting Emergency Procedures on Campus for
    Individuals with Disabilities, Mary Farrell, ed.
  • Helps readers develop or adapt procedures for
    individuals with disabilities in emergency
    situations.
  • Contains a general framework for planning
    emergency procedures (with disability-specific
    guidelines), management procedures for specific
    disaster situations, emergency procedures for
    laboratory settings, and self-advocacy.

45
Final Thoughts
  • Campus and community networking We need to be
    familiar with campus and community resources to
    address food, shelter, medical, financial,
    housing, counseling, spiritual and other
    fundamental needs during an emergency.
  • Consider concerns about communication and
    transportation.
  • Counseling for "disaster survivors" There is an
    initial and long-term need for meaningful
    support.

46
Final Thoughts (Contd)
  • Lessons for us all
  • Among other lessons, Hurricane Katrina was a
    wake up call for better emergency preparedness,
    emergency evacuation, and post-disaster survival.
  • We have much to do.
  • We have much to be thankful for.
  • Compiled by Ann Ito, University of Hawaii
    Manoa

47
  • L. Irene Bowen
  • U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division
  • Deputy Chief, Disability Rights Section
  • 950 Pennsylvania Avenue NW -- NYA
  • Washington, DC 20530
  • Phone 202 307 0663 (V/TTY)
  • Fax 202 307 1197
  • EmailL.Irene.Bowen_at_usdoj.gov
  • Emily Singer
  • Director
  • Disability Support Services
  • The Catholic University of America
  • 620 Michigan Ave NE
  • 207 Pryzbyla Center
  • Washington, DC 20064
  • Phone 202-319-5211
  • Fax 202-319-5126
  • Email singere_at_cua.edu
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