ONLINE self-study - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – ONLINE self-study PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 3b58a9-NDM0Y



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

ONLINE self-study

Description:

ONLINE SELF-STUDY UNC Hot Work Permit Program Safety Training * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Hot ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:132
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 72
Provided by: ehsUncEdu
Learn more at: http://ehs.unc.edu
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: ONLINE self-study


1
ONLINE self-study
  • UNC Hot Work Permit Program Safety Training

2
Course Objectives
  • 1) Be able to identify the general hazards
    associated with Hot Work Activities
  • 2) Be able to explain the procedures involved
    in the
  • UNC Hot Work Permitting System.
  • Be able to explain the roles of personnel for the
    Hot Work Permit System including the Hot Work
    Operator, Permit Authorizing Individual, and the
    Fire Watch.

3
Course Objectives
4) Be able to explain the difference between a
designated hot work area, a controlled hot work
area, and an area where hot work is not permitted
under any circumstances. 5) Understand
Contractor Responsibilities, Mutual
Responsibility, and the importance of individual
initiative to halt work operations when workplace
conditions develop that could pose a hazard.
4
Hot Work Definitions
  • Hot Work Definitions

5
Hot Work Definitions
  • Hot Work
  • Defined as work involving burning, welding,
    or similar operation that is capable of
    initiating fires or explosions.
  • Hot work also includes other activities with the
    potential to create a source of ignition such as
    cutting, brazing, grinding, soldering, or hot
    riveting.
  • The OSHA hot work standard 29 CFR 1910.251-257,
    defines practices that should be implemented
    during the performance of hot work. This
    standard covers the safety requirements of the
    different types of welding processes. In
    addition, refer to the UNC-CH IMAC Safety Manual
    for Welding and Cutting Safety Policy
    Requirements.

6
Hot Work Definitions
  • Hot Work
  • Hot work also includes other activities with
    the potential to create a source of ignition and
    process applications that produce sparks, flame,
    or heat.
  • Hot work is a familiar routine activity at
    most industrial facilities. But because hot work
    tools are highly portable source of ignition,
    improperly conducted hot work is a major cause of
    fires and explosions which have resulted in
    extensive property damage, serious personnel
    injury, and worker deaths.

7
Hot Work Definitions
  • Hot Work Operator is the Departmental
    employee who is qualified and authorized by
    management to perform hot work such as welding,
    brazing, soldering, and other associated work
    tasks.

8
Hot Work Definitions
  • Permit Authorizing Individual (PAI) is the
    Departmental employee who is trained and
    authorized to issue a hot work permit by
    management.
  • The Fire Watch is the Department employee who is
    trained in hot work safety and monitors the hot
    work area for changing conditions, watches for
    fires and extinguishes them if possible.

9
Hot Work Definitions
  • Designated Area is a permanent location
    approved for routine hot work operations made
    safe by removal of all possible sources of
    combustion that could be ignited by the hot work
    tool.
  • Above Illustrations of two Designated Areas at
    one of the UNC Energy Services Maintenance Shops.
    Combustible materials have been removed to make
    this a safe location to perform welding
    operations.

10
Hot Work Definitions
  • Controlled Area is a work area in which safe
    conditions for hot work exist or where safe
    conditions can be created by moving or protecting
    combustibles.
  • A hot work permit is required in a controlled
    area.
  • An example of a controlled area is in a campus
    building construction area where welding must
    take place and the work area has been made safe
    by removing all combustibles and implementing the
    requirements of the hot work permit in order to
    make it safe.

11
Hot Work Definitions
  • Non- Permissible
  • Area(s)/Location
  • is a location which hot work is
  • prohibited.
  • Fires and explosions
  • caused by improperly conducted hot
  • work can have deadly consequences.
  • In the last decade their have been
  • numerous worker injuries and deaths
  • in general industry that have resulted
  • from not following proper hot
  • work procedures.

12
Hot Work Definitions
  • Welding Blanket is a heat-resistant fabric
    designed to be placed in the vicinity of a hot
    work operation. Intended for use in horizontal
    applications with light to moderate exposures
    such as that resulting from chipping, grinding,
    heat treating, sand blasting, and light
    horizontal welding. Designed to protect
    machinery and prevent ignition of combustibles
    such as wood that are located adjacent to the
    underside of the blanket. They are made from
    different materials such as fiberglass, Silica,
    and other fire resistant materials.

Above Illustration Courtesy of Northern Tool
Equipment Company
13
Hot Work Definitions
  • Welding Curtain is heat-resistant fabric
    designed to be placed in the vicinity of a hot
    work operation. Intended for use in vertical
    application with light to moderate exposures such
    as that resulting from chipping, grinding, heat
    treating, and light horizontal welding. Designed
    to prevent sparks from escaping a welding area.
    An illustration of a welding curtain is provided
    below.

Above Illustration Courtesy of UNC Energy
Services CoGeneration Facility Maintenance Shop
14
Hot Work Definitions
  • Welding Pads are heat-resistant fabric
    designed to be placed directly under a hot work
    operation such as welding or cutting. Welding
    pads are intended for use horizontal applications
    with severe exposures such as that resulting from
    molten substances of heavy horizontal welding.
    Welding pads are designed to prevent the ignition
    of combustibles that are located adjacent to the
    underside of the pad.

15
Hot Work Hazards
  • Hot Work Hazards

16
Hot Work Hazards
  • Fire Hazard Molten metal, sparks, slag, and
    hot work
  • surfaces can cause fire or explosion if
    precautionary
  • measures are not followed.

17
Hot Work Hazards
  • Flying sparks are the main cause of fires and
    explosions in welding and cutting. Sparks can
    travel up to 35 feet from the work area. Sparks
    and molten metal can travel greater distances
    when falling.
  • Sparks can pass through or become lodged in
    cracks, clothing, pipe holes, and other small
    openings in floors, walls, or partitions which
    can cause fires to start.

18
Hot Work Hazards
  • Combustible Materials are anything that is
    combustible or flammable and is susceptible to
    ignition by cutting and welding. The most common
    materials likely to become involved in fire are
    those of combustible building construction such
    as the following
  • Floors, partitions, and roofs
  • Wood, paper, textiles, plastics, chemicals, and
    flammable liquids and gases, and dusts.
  • Ground cover such as grass and brush.

19
Hot Work Hazards
  • Explosion Hazard
  • Welding and cutting can cause explosions in
    spaces containing flammable gases, vapors,
    liquids, or combustible dusts, and tanks and
    vessels that contain or have held flammable
    substances.
  • Above Courtesy U.S. CSB, Tanks involved in the
    2006 accident that killed three workers

20
Hot Work Hazards
  • Physical and Health Hazards
  • There are many hazards to the hot work
    operator (i.e. welder) associated with hot work
    such as
  • Burns,
  • Sparks,
  • Electric shock hazards,
  • Optical (UV) radiation,
  • Inhalation of welding fumes.
  • Engineering controls, personal protective
    equipment, and safe work practices safeguards the
    welder from many physical and health hazards.

21
Hot Work Hazards
  • Can you Identify Some of the Hazards in the
    following Illustrations?

22
Hot Work Hazards
  • What Hazards Exist in the below illustrations?

23
Hot Work Hazards
  • What Hazards Exist?
  • Eye hazards (UV optical radiation and burn
    hazards) to the eyes.
  • Skin burn hazards from the welder and hot
    surfaces.
  • Electrical hazards (for above electric welding
    processes) notice that the work area is dry and
    free from water and moisture at the welding work
    area.
  • Slip, Trip, and Fall hazards from welding hoses
    and shop equipment.
  • Inhalation (respiratory) hazards of welding fumes
    and smoke generated from welding processes when
    inadequate ventilation is used as illustrated in
    the top left picture. Notice that in the right
    picture there is less welding smoke.

24
Hot Work Hazards
  • What Hazards Exist in the below illustration?

25
Hot Work Hazards
  • What hazards exist?
  • Eye hazards Impact hazards from flying chips and
    debris, hot slag, and sparks.
  • Inhalation (respiratory) hazards of dusts
    generated when grinding on metal surface
    coatings.
  • Fire Ignition Hazard(s) from flying sparks that
    could ignite combustible materials in the work
    area. Sparks can travel up to 35 and ignite
    combustible materials.

26
Hot Work Hazards Summary
  • Hot work can be dangerous because the tools
    used are highly portable sources of ignition that
    can be introduced into areas where ignition
    sources do not usually exist.
  • Sparks, flame, or heat can travel great distances
    by various means and ignite combustibles in other
    areas far away from the hot work.
  • There are also explosion, fire, and physical and
    health hazards associated with hot work as
    previously reviewed.
  • The goal of hot work safety practices is to avoid
    bringing sparks, flame, or heat produced by the
    tool into contact with a source of fuel.

27
  • Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • Hot Work Locations

28
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements- Hot Work
Locations
  • Hot work is allowed in two types of locations
  • Designated area is a permanent location approved
    for routine hot work operations made safe by
    removal of all possible sources of ignition that
    could be ignited by the hot work tool.
  • Controlled Area is one in which safe conditions
    for hot work exist or where safe conditions can
    be created by moving or protecting combustibles.
  • Non permissible location Hot work is never
    permitted in certain types of locations where
    safe conditions do not exist and cannot be
    created.

29
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements- Hot Work
Locations
  • Designated Area is a permanent location
    approved for routine hot work operations made
    safe by removal of all possible sources of
    combustion that could be ignited by the hot work
    tool.
  • Above Illustrations of two Designated Areas at
    one of the UNC Energy Services Maintenance Shops.
    Combustible materials have been removed to make
    this a safe location to perform welding.

30
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements- Hot Work
Locations
  • Designated Area
  • An example, is the Welding Shop or Maintenance
    Shop (as illustrated below) where all
    combustibles have been removed.
  • A Hot Work Permit is not required in a Designated
    Hot Work Area.
  • Above Illustration of UNC Art Lab Welding
    Area, which is considered a Designated Area. A
    hot work permit is not required in a Designated
    Hot Work Area.

31
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements- Hot Work
Locations
  • Controlled Area is one in which safe conditions
    for hot work exist or where safe conditions can
    be created by moving or protecting combustibles.
  • An example of a controlled area is in a campus
    building construction area where welding must
    take place and the work area has been made safe
    by removing all combustibles and implementing the
    requirements of the hot work permit in order to
    make it safe.

32
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements- Hot Work
Locations
  • In a Controlled Area, a Hot Work Permit must
    be obtained by the hot work operator. The permit
    must be obtained from the Departmental designated
    Permit Authorizing Individual (PAI) before the
    hot work can proceed in a controlled area.
  • The permit includes a checklist of
    precautions, each of which must be considered
    and then implemented if the PAI determines that
    is applicable to the specific situation, such as
    ensuring fire protection equipment is available
    in the work area, controlling potential and
    existing fuel sources, and posting a fire watch
    when required.

33
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements- Hot Work
Locations
  • Non- Permissible Area(s)/Location Hot work
    shall not
  • be permitted in the following areas
  • In areas not authorized by Management.
  • In sprinklered buildings where sprinklers are
    impaired.
  • In the presence of explosive atmospheres (i.e.,
    where mixtures of flammable gases, vapors,
    liquids, or dust with air exist).
  • In the presence of uncleaned or improperly
    prepared equipment, drums, tanks, or other
    containers that have previously contained
    flammable materials that could develop explosive
    atmospheres.
  • In areas with an accumulation of combustible
    dusts that could develop explosive atmospheres.

34
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • Hot work is prohibited
  • In, on, or near tanks, vessels, or containers
    that contain or have contained flammable
    substances.

35
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements- Hot Work
Location Examples
  • Non- Permissible Area(s)/Location Examples
  • Fuel/ Fuel Oil Storage Tanks
  • Hot work is not allowed in, on, or near
    fuel and fuel oil storage tanks such as
    illustrated below

36
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements- Hot Work
Location Examples
  • Non- Permissible Area(s)/Location Examples
  • Fuel/ Fuel Oil Storage Tanks
  • Hot work is not allowed in, on, or near
    fuel and fuel oil storage tanks such as
    illustrated below

37
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements- Hot Work
Location Examples
  • Non- Permissible Area(s)/Location Examples
  • Fuel/ Fuel Oil Storage Tanks
  • Hot work is not allowed in, on, or near
    fuel and fuel oil storage tanks such as
    illustrated below

38
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements- Hot Work
Location Examples
  • Non- Permissible Area(s)/Location Examples

39
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • Non- Permissible Area(s)/Location Examples
  • For hot work in the vicinity of any
    potential hazardous location, the atmosphere must
    be tested for atmospheric hazards including
    flammable gasses using a combustible gas
    indicator by a trained PAI or EHS before
    commencing hot work.
  • Contact EHS at 962-5507 before commencing
    any hot work in a potentially hazardous location.

40
  • Hot Work Permit Program Requirements

41
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • Analyze the Hazards- Prior to initiation of
    hot work, perform a hazard assessment that
    identifies
  • The scope of the work,
  • Potential hazards,
  • Methods of hazard control.

42
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • After analyzing the hazards, see if there
    is any possibility of Hot Work Alternatives. An
    alternative hot work method is termed Cold
    Work.
  • 1) Can the job be completed with cold work?
  • An example of cold work is performing
    repairs with another method
  • instead of using a heat producing tool. If
    yes, a hot work permit is not required.
  • 2) Can hot work be performed in a
    designated area (e.g. maintenance or welding
    shop). If yes, then a hot work permit is not
    required.
  • 3) Is the proposed work to be performed in
    a non- permissible area?
  • HOT WORK AND PERMIT ARE NOT AUTHORIZED
    in a non-permissible location.

43
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • Here is an example of a decision flow that can be
    utilized
  • to help determine if a hot work permit is needed
    or not.

44
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • YES
  • NO
  • YES
  • NO
  • YES YES YES
  • NO
  • YES
  • NO

1. Is there an acceptable alternative to hot
work??
Yes, Complete job with Cold Work. No hot work
permit is needed.?
Yes, Examine designated area, then complete hot
work there. No hot work permit is needed.?
2. Can hot work be performed in a designated
area (e.g. Maintenance Shop)?
Yes, Obtain a written hot work permit.?
3. Is the proposed work to be performed in a
non-designated area (e.g. NOT in a Maintenance
Shop)??
YES, Hot Work and Permit are Not Authorized in a
non-permissible area
4. Is the proposed work to be performed in a
non-permissible area?
No, Obtain a written hot work permit to work in a
Controlled Area.
45
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • If it is decided that a hot work permit is
    required for a job task, the Hot Work Permit must
    be obtained by the hot work operator from the
    Permit Authorizing Individual (PAI).
  • The PAI is designated by management before the
    hot work can proceed in a controlled area.

46
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • The Hot Work Permit includes a checklist of
    precautions, each of which must be considered and
    then implemented if the PAI determines that it is
    applicable to the specific situation.

47
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • UNC Hot Work Permit Click on the below Hot
    Work Permit

48
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • Fire Protection Equipment All required fire
    protection, detection, and extinguishing
    equipment must be available, in service, and
    fully operable.
  • Examples of equipment that needs to be
    considered include
  • Fire extinguishers
  • Fire Sprinklers,
  • Hose stream, pales of water available?
  • Proximity to the fire alarm.

49
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • Fuel sources fuel sources within 35 from
    hot work are easily ignited, so within this area
  • Combustible materials must be removed or
    shielded.
  • The floor must be swept clean of combustible
    materials.
  • The absence of hazardous atmospheres and/or
    flammable materials must be verified, steps must
    be taken to ensure that none are introduced, and
    adequate ventilation must be assured.
  • Combustible floors must be covered with damp sand
    or fire resistant sheets.

50
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • Fuel sources (contd) fuel sources within
    35 from hot work are easily ignited, so within
    this area
  • Openings or cracks in walls, floors, or ducts
    through which sparks might travel and ignite
    combustibles in other locations must be covered.
    Conveyer systems must be shut down.
  • Fire resistant tarps must be suspended beneath
    overhead work.
  • If hot work is done on one side of a wall,
    partition, ceiling, or roof, precautions shall be
    taken to prevent ignition of combustibles on the
    other side by relocating the combustibles.

51
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • Fuel sources (contd) If relocation is
    impractical, combustibles shall be protected by a
    approved welding curtain, welding blanket,
    welding pad, or equivalent rated ANSI/FM 4950.
  • The above illustration is of a welding curtain
    used to prevent sparks from traveling to adjacent
    work areas.

52
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • Fuel sources (contd)
  • If it is impractical to relocate combustibles, a
  • Fire Watch must be provided on the side
    opposite from where work is being performed.

53
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • A Fire Watch is needed when there is a
    chance that fire might develop from combustible
    materials. A fire watch is needed if combustible
    materials are located
  • 1) Closer than 35 from the hot work.
  • 2) More than 35 away from the hot work
    but might be easily ignited by sparks.
  • 3) Walls or floor openings within 35
    expose combustible materials in adjacent areas
    including concealed areas spaces in walls and
    floors.
  • 4) Adjacent to the opposite side of
    partitions, walls, ceilings, or roofs.

54
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • The Fire Watch monitors the hot work area
    for changing conditions and watches for fires,
    and extinguishes them if possible. The Fire
    Watch shall be familiar with the facilities and
    procedures for sounding the fire alarm and
    contacting the Fire Department in the event of an
    emergency.
  • Note When changing conditions are observed by
    anyone whether the fire watch, hot work
    operator, PAI, or any other employee that person
    should immediately halt the hot work on his or
    her own initiative!!

55
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • Remember, Fire Watches must
  • Have fire extinguishing equipment readily
    available and be trained in its use.
  • Be familiar with facilities for sounding an alarm
    and contacting the Fire Department in the event
    of a fire.
  • Watch for fires in all exposed areas.
  • Try to extinguish fires only when obviously
    within the capability of equipment available, or
    otherwise sound the alarm.
  • Be maintained for at least a half-hour after
    completion of welding or cutting operations to
    detect and extinguish possible smoldering fires.

56
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • Contractor Responsibilities
  • The designated departmental PAI should
    supervise outside contractors that are planning
    to engage in hot work activities.
  • The departmental PAI informs contractors
    about site-specific hazards including the
    presence of flammable materials at the work site.

57
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • Mutual Responsibility Management,
    contractors, the PAI, the fire watch, and the hot
    work operators shall recognize their mutual
    responsibility for safety in hot work operations.

58
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements
  • Individual Employee Responsibilities
  • Any employee that observes changing unsafe
    condition associated with hot work activities
    must use individual initiative to report the
    unsafe condition(s).
  • Each employee has the right to halt hot work
    operations when new conditions develop that could
    pose a hazard to employees.
  • An example of changing conditions might be the
    introduction of a flammable substance into the
    hot work area.

59
  • Hot Work Accident Case Studies

60
Hot Work Accident Case Studies
  • Case Study 1 Welding and cutting can cause
    explosions in spaces containing flammable gases,
    vapors, liquids, or combustible dusts, and tanks
    and vessels that contain or have held flammable
    substances.
  • Above Courtesy U.S. CSB, Tanks involved in the
    2006 accident that killed three workers

61
Hot Work Accident Case Studies
  • Case Study 1 Explosion
  • Previous Slide Photo Below Information,
    Courtesy U.S. CSB,
  • Tanks involved in the 2006 accident that killed
    three workers . On June 5, 2006, contract
    workers were installing a new pipe between two
    oil tanks at a rural oilfield when sparks from a
    welding torch ignited flammable hydrocarbon vapor
    venting from one of the tanks. That tank and
    another nearby tank exploded, killing three
    workers who were standing above the tanks and
    seriously injuring a fourth. All of the tanks
    were interconnected by piping and one of the
    tanks contained crude oil, the source of the
    vapor that fueled the explosions. The workers
    had not performed combustible gas monitoring
    prior to or during the hot work instead relying
    on the unsafe and unreliable practice of using a
    lit torch to check one of the tanks for flammable
    vapor.
  • Workers did not empty or isolate the tank that
    contained crude oil prior to initiating hot work
    activities.
  • Neither the contract company nor the parent
    company required written hot work permits. The
    contractor company did not provide hot work
    safety training to employees.

62
Hot Work Permit Program Case Studies
  • Case Study 2 Explosion Below Information
    and Photo, Courtesy U.S. CSB,
  • A.V. Thomas Produce
  • Atwater, California, March 31, 2009
  • 2 Workers Severely Burned
  • Two employees at A.V. Thomas Produce were using
    an oxygen-acetylene torch to loosen a fitting on
    an old fuel tank, which the company hoped to
    refurbish for field storage of diesel fuel. The
    workers, however, were unaware that the tank
    contained residual hydrocarbon liquid and vapor
    from an unknown prior use. The tank was not
    cleaned or purged before work began. Shortly
    after applying heat to the tank, an explosion
    occurred, blowing the end of the vessel off. Both
    employees were airlifted to a regional burn
    center, where they were treated for burns
    covering 30 to 50 of their bodies.
  • The facility had no formal hot work program, and
    no permit was issued for the hot work being
    performed. No combustible gas testing was
    performed prior to commencement of the hot work
    the company did not have a policy that required
    it. In addition, many workers were mono-lingual
    Spanish speakers and had not been trained on safe
    hot work procedures or on the proper use of gas
    detectors in their native language.

63
Hot Work Accident Case Studies
  • Case Study 2 Explosion
  • Below Photo, Courtesy U.S. CSB,

Exterior and interior views of the fuel tank
involved in the hot work accident at A.V. Thomas
Produce.
64
Hot Work Accident Case Studies
  • Case Study 3 Explosion
  • Below Information and Photo, Courtesy U.S.
    CSB,
  • Bethune Point Wastewater Plant
  • Daytona Beach, Florida, January 11, 2006
  • 2 Workers Killed, 1 Critically Injured
  • Two workers were killed and another critically
    injured in an explosion involving a methanol
    storage tank at a municipal wastewater treatment
    facility in Daytona Beach, Florida. The explosion
    occurred while the three workers were cutting a
    metal roof located directly above the tank vent.
    Sparks showered from the cutting torch and
    ignited methanol vapor escaping from the vent,
    creating a fireball on top of the tank. A
    corroded and ineffective flame arrester15 on the
    vent allowed the fire to propagate through the
    device, igniting methanol vapors and air inside
    the tank, resulting in an explosion.
  • Daytona Beach public employees were not covered
    by OSHA standards, which is typical for local and
    state governments in a number of jurisdictions.
    The city had no formal permitting system for hot
    work or non-routine maintenance activities, and
    workers had not received any training on methanol
    hazards in the previous 10 years. Combustible gas
    monitoring was not performed or required.

65
Hot Work Accident Case Studies
  • Case Study 4 Fire at a University Library
  • Courtesy (NFPA 51B standard - Significant Hot
    Work Incidents)
  • University Library. Workers were using an
    acetylene torch to remove old heating ducts in a
    utility shaft between the 20th and 21st stories
    of the tower of a 27-story university library
    building. Flying sparks fell through a vent and
    ignited papers stacked against the vent in a
    storage room on the 20th floor. Apparently the
    fire burned 20 to 30 minutes before discovery.
  • There was no fire protection in the upper
    stories, except for portable fire extinguishers,
    and fire fighters had to connect to the
    standpipes in the 3rd and 4th stories and pull
    hose lines up the enclosed stairways to the 20th
    and 21st stories. They finally controlled the
    fire in 2.5 hrs, but damage extended to 4 stories
    when fire spread by way of nonfirestopped utility
    shafts and elevator shafts. The work was being
    done by two air-conditioning installation
    workers, on contract. They had not investigated
    the possibility of combustible material being in
    contact with the old heating duct on which they
    were working.

66
Hot Work Accident Case Studies
  • Case Study 5 Fire in Warehouse Facility
  • Courtesy (NFPA 51B standard - Significant Hot
    Work Incidents)
  • Warehouse Facility. While an arc welder was
    being used on the second floor, sparks dropped
    through an opening to cardboard boxes below and
    the boxes ignited. There was no fire watch on
    the first floor, and when the fire was discovered
    15 minutes later, employees could not put it out.
    They finally called the fire department but were
    too late to save the two-story building of
    ordinary construction. The total loss was 1.6
    million.

67
Hot Work Accident Case Studies
  • Case Study 6
  • Lumber Mill. Workers had shut down one of
    several sprinkler systems in the plant to remove
    branch lines to facilitate removal of a conveyer.
    While workers were cutting bolts from the
    conveyer with welding equipment, some of the
    sparks passed through cracks in the floor and
    landed in sawdust accumulations below.
    Smoldering occurred for 3 hours without being
    noticed by the maintenance employees, who were
    the only people in the plant. Meanwhile, the
    area in the region of the cutting operations, but
    not the floor below, had been washed down and
    visited regularly at ½-hour intervals.
  • When the fire was finally noticed, some time was
    spent in trying to extinguish it before the fire
    department was called. By the time the fire
    department arrived, it was too late to save the
    lumber storage and stacker buildings.
    Destruction caused a total loss of 1.25 million.

68
  • Hot Work Permit Program Training Summary

69
Hot Work Permit Program Requirements- Summary
  • In Summary
  • Hot work activities creates various health and
    physical hazards. The goal of the hot work
    permit program is to prevent heat sources from
    coming into contact with fuel sources in order to
    prevent the possibility of fires and explosions
    that could result in injury, death, and loss of
    property.
  • Hot work is allowed in 2 types of locations.
    Designated area is a permanent location (such as
    a Welding or Maintenance Shop) approved for
    routine hot work operations. A Designated area
    has been made safe by removal of all possible
    ignition sources.
  • A Controlled Area is an out of shop location
    which safe conditions exist or where safe
    conditions can be created by moving or protecting
    combustibles.
  • A Hot Work Operator must obtain a Hot Work Permit
    from the Departmental Permit Authorizing
    Individual before performing hot work in a
    Controlled Area.
  • A Fire Watch must be posted when hot work is
    performed in a location where other than a minor
    fire might develop.
  • A Non-Permissible Location is a hazardous
    location such as a tank that holds flammable
    chemicals. No Hot Work is allowed in this type
    of work environment.
  • It is critical that proper planning and
    communication be implemented by all involved in
    planning work involving hot work to reduce the
    possibility of injury, death, and property loss.

70
Conclusion
  • In conclusion, everyone involved with hot work
    needs to understand and follow proper safety
    procedures to prevent accidents associated with
    hot work activities.

71
References Used and Additional Hot Work
Information
  • References
  • National Fire Protection Agency 51B, Standard
    for Fire Prevention during Welding, Cutting and
    Other Hot Work.
  • American National Standards Institute, Standard
    Z49.12005, Safety in Welding, Cutting, and
    Allied Processes
  • US Chemical Safety Board www.csb.gov
  • American Welding Society, Safety and Health Fact
    Sheets
  • OSHA General Industry Standard, Subpart Q,
    1910.251- 1910. 255, Welding, Cutting, and
    Brazing
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers , Safety and Health
    Manual , Section 10 Welding and Cutting
  • Washington State Department of Labor and
    Industries, Hexavalent Chromium (chrome 6)
    Training on the hazards of hexavalent chromium in
    the workplace
  •  
About PowerShow.com