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Student Learning Outcomes

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Student Learning Outcomes Strategic Thinking and Doing Presentation at Fall Convocation for Cosumnes River College, Sacramento, California, August 13, 2004 – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Student Learning Outcomes


1
Student Learning Outcomes
  • Strategic Thinking and Doing

Presentation at Fall Convocation for Cosumnes
River College, Sacramento, California, August 13,
2004
George H. Copa New Designs for Learning School of
Education Oregon State University
2
Participant Learning Outcome
  • Participants can better engage in critical
    thinking and in-depth conversation about student
    learning outcomes with the view that it should
    and can be done at Cosumnes River College.

3
Outline of Presentation
  • Challenge
  • Meaning
  • Benefits and Costs
  • Foundations
  • Considerations
  • Operations
  • Worthy and Realistic Vision

4
Challenge Envision an institution that
  • Reawakens the potential of all learners, faculty
    and staff, and community
  • Has a special spirit that gives coherence and
    meaning to all dimensions of the learning
    experience, as well as pride and joy in its
    results
  • Levels the playing field for all learners, giving
    multiple pathways to learn what is most valuable
    to know, be able to do, and value.

Source George Copa and William Ammentorp, A New
Vision for the Two-Year Institution of Higher
Education, 1997.
5
Challenge Envision an institution that
  • Works so closely with the community that borders
    are blurred and blended so learning can occur any
    place and any time
  • Is always vibrant, responsive, and on the
    cutting edge in what is learned and how it is
    learned
  • Can confidently find the resources to do what it
    sets out to do

Source George Copa and William Ammentorp, A New
Vision for the Two-Year Institution of Higher
Education, 1997.
6
Challenge Earnest Search for Synergies
  • We must begin a more earnest search for the
    synergies that will better connect our
    educational institutions to our lifeplaces in
    ways that free and create resources and multiply
    desired results.

Source George Copa and William Ammentorp, A New
Vision for the Two-Year Institution of Higher
Education, 1997.
7
Challenge Lifeplaces of Focus for Community
Colleges
Family Life
Community Life
Work Life
Personal Life
8
Challenge One Such Synergy
Defining and Assessing Student Learning Outcomes
9
Meaning Confusion of Terms
  • Objectives
  • Goals
  • Abilities
  • Competencies
  • Proficiencies
  • Standards
  • Expectations
  • Results
  • Outcomes

10
Meaning Student Learning Outcomes
  • Student (learner) focused
  • Outcome focused
  • External oriented
  • Application
  • Integrative
  • Doing/active
  • Explicit assessment

11
Meaning Student Learning Outcomes as Keystone of
Learning
Student Learning Outcomes
12
Benefits
  • Student
  • Faculty and staff
  • College
  • Community

13
Benefits Students
  • Clearer communications what to learn, progress
    and feedback, when completed
  • More involvement in decision about what and how
    to learn and how to assess
  • Increased confidence
  • Meaningful record to use in next steps

14
Benefits Faculty and Staff
  • Clearer communications what is to be learned,
    how to teach, giving feedback along the way,
    determining when complete
  • More coordination and collaboration among
    courses, among programs, among academic and
    support services join ownership
  • More intense and deep reflection and conversation
    about teaching and learning scholarship of
    teaching
  • More sound bases for innovation and improvement
  • More complete and explicit evidence of
    accomplishment

15
Benefits College
  • More true to mission, vision, and values
  • Clearer communications promises, delivery
  • More efficient use of resources gaps,
    duplication, unnecessary
  • More explicit accountability assessment,
    reporting, improvement
  • Better case for additional resources

16
Benefits Community
  • More engaged and responsive to needs
  • Clearer communications what to expect
  • Better use of resources how being managed and
    delivered
  • More explicit accountability what able to do
  • Increased sense of pride things are working

17
Response College Accrediting Commissions
  • Standard I Institutional Mission and
    Effectiveness
  • Standard II Student Learning Programs and
    Services
  • Standard III Resources

Source Accreditation Commission for Community
and Junior Colleges of the Western Association of
Schools and Colleges, June, 2002.
18
Response College Accrediting Commissions
Standard 1
  • Institutional Mission and Effectiveness
  • The institution demonstrates its effectiveness
    by providing 1) evidence of the achievement of
    student learning outcomes

Source Accreditation Commission for Community
and Junior Colleges of the Western Association of
Schools and Colleges, June, 2002.
19
Response College Accrediting Commissions
Standard II
  • Student Learning Programs and Services
  • The institution identifies student learning
    outcomes for courses, programs, certificates, and
    degrees assesses student achievement of those
    outcomes and uses assessment results to make
    improvements
  • The institution systematically assesses student
    support services using student learning
    outcomes.

Source Accreditation Commission for Community
and Junior Colleges of the Western Association of
Schools and Colleges, June, 2002.
20
Response College Accrediting Commissions
Standard III
  • Resources
  • The institution effectively uses its human,
    physical, technology, and financial resources to
    achieve its broad educational purposes, including
    stated student learning outcomes
  • Faculty and others directly responsible for
    progress toward achieving stated student learning
    outcomes have, as a component of their
    evaluation, effectiveness in producing those
    learning outcomes.

Source Accreditation Commission for Community
and Junior Colleges of the Western Association of
Schools and Colleges, June, 2002.
21
Response College Accrediting Commissions --
Definition
  • Student Learning Outcomes
  • Knowledge, skills, abilities, and attitudes that
    a student has attained at the end (or as a
    result) of his or her engagement in a particular
    set of collegiate experiences.

Source Accreditation Commission for Community
and Junior Colleges of the Western Association of
Schools and Colleges, June, 2002.
22
Costs
  • Time
  • Resources
  • Turmoil
  • Risk of failure

23
Foundations
  • Learning Context
  • Learning Participants/Audience
  • Learning Signature

Source George Copa and William Ammentorp, A New
Vision for the Two-Year Institution of Higher
Education, 1997.
24
Foundations Learning Context
  • Assets
  • Challenges
  • Opportunities
  • Aspirations

Source George Copa and William Ammentorp, A New
Vision for the Two-Year Institution of Higher
Education, 1997.
25
Foundations Learning Audience
  • Students
  • Faculty and staff
  • Community
  • Larger society

Source George Copa and William Ammentorp, A New
Vision for the Two-Year Institution of Higher
Education, 1997.
26
Foundations Learning Signature
  • What is to be special and unique about the
    learning experience and culture at CRC?

Source George Copa and William Ammentorp, A New
Vision for the Two-Year Institution of Higher
Education, 1997.
27
Considerations
  • Coordination across multiple levels and
    components
  • Challenging and consequential undertaking
  • Clear and agreed upon process
  • Supportive strategies

28
Considerations -- Coordination
  • Across multiple levels and components
  • Course/activity
  • Program/service
  • Degree, certificate, other end points
  • Institution

29
Considerations -- Coordination
Across multiple levels and components
Institution-Level
Program/ Service - Level
Academic
Support Services
Course/ Activity -Level
30
Considerations -- Challenges
  • Serious and consequential undertaking
  • Impacts all aspects of college
  • No one, clear, tried, and agreed upon process
  • Takes strong and sustained commitment from
    leadership, faculty and staff, students, and
    other key stakeholders not one cycle process
  • Will need to show itself in priorities for
    planning, staffing, staff development, resource
    allocation, and accountability
  • Make every effort to build on what has already
    been done and learn from other colleges
  • Community colleges context makes this initiative
    both compelling and complex

31
Considerations Powerful Process
  • Clear, robust, and agreed upon process
  • Taking on ill-defined problem
  • Complex, changing, and large-scale environment
  • Make it public know by all
  • Must be robust adaptable to variety of
    situations
  • Produce consistent results provides for
    coordination yet sufficiently flexible
  • Agreed upon consensus by leadership
  • Practical/workable in terms of time and
    resources, works
  • Way to keep track supporting software

32
Considerations Supportive Strategies
  • Lessons from others about how to go about
  • Initiate conversations on learning
  • Build core leadership
  • Develop shared sense of where going
  • Create action plans and carry them out
  • Involve all important stakeholders
  • Provide needed support

Source Adapted from Terry OBanion, Launching a
Learner-Centered College, 1999.
33
Considerations Supportive Strategies
  • Lessons from others about how to go about
  • Develop open communications plan
  • Consider use of consultants and established
    processes
  • Pay attention to language
  • Visibly reallocate resources
  • Evaluate products and processes
  • Commit to long haul
  • Celebrate accomplishments

Source Adapted from Terry OBanion, Launching a
Learner-Centered College, 1999.
34
Operations
  • Approaches
  • Resources
  • Components
  • Examples course, program, institutional
  • Criteria
  • Caveats

35
Operations -- Approaches
  • Involvement
  • Traditional done by instructor/service provider
    in isolation
  • Transitional -1 done in collaboration by
    instructors/service providers in same area
  • Transitional - 2 done in collaboration by
    instructors/service providers across several
    areas
  • Transformational done by instructors/service
    providers across several areas and others
    (students, business and industry, university)

Source George Copa and William Ammentorp, A New
Vision for the Two-Year Institution of Higher
Education, 1997.
36
Operations Transformational Approach
Broad involvement in defining student learning
outcomes.
Faculty Multiple Areas
Staff from Support Services
Students
Stakeholders Outside the College
37
Operations -- Approaches
  • Starting Point
  • Course/Activity Level
  • Program/Support Service Level
  • Degree/Certificate/Other End Point Level
  • Institutional Level
  • Multiple/Iterative Levels

38
Operations -- Approaches
  • Orientation
  • Typical
  • Content Assessment
  • Outcome-based
  • Learning Outcomes Content

39
Operations -- Approaches
  • Grounding
  • Typical -- Content
  • Outcome-based Life Outside the College Work,
    Community, Family, Personal Roles and
    Responsibilities

40
Challenge Lifeplaces of Focus for Community
Colleges
Family Life
Community Life
Work Life
Personal Life
41
Operations Environment
Attention to near and far environment time,
geographic.
Near
Source Adapted from Ruth Stiehl and Les Lewchuk,
2002, The Outcome Primer
42
Operations -- Resources
  • Not Starting from Scratch
  • Present course, program, and support service
    thinking, plans, and information
  • Faculty and staff experience and expertise
  • Feedback from students, employers, transfer
    institutions
  • Accreditation feedback
  • Professional associations, certification
    agencies, transfer institutions
  • Other colleges

43
Operations -- Components
  • Course Level This is not the same as a
    syllabus.
  • Intended Outcomes What do students need to be
    able to do out there in life roles for which
    this course prepares them?
  • Assessment Tasks What can students do in here
    to demonstrate the intended outcomes?
  • Concepts and Issues What do students need to
    understand in order to demonstrate the intended
    outcomes?
  • Skills What skills do students need that are
    essential to the intended outcomes?

Source Adapted from Ruth Stiehl and Les Lewchuk,
2002, The Outcome Primer
44
Meaning Student Learning Outcomes as Keystone of
Learning
Student Learning Outcomes
45
Challenge Lifeplaces of Focus for Community
Colleges
Family Life
Community Life
Work Life
Personal Life
46
Operations Transformational Approach
Broad involvement in defining student learning
outcomes.
Faculty Multiple Areas
Staff from Support Services
Students
Stakeholders Outside the College
47
Operations -- Example
  • Course Level Student Learning Outcomes for
    Graphic Style Course in Integrated Office Systems
    Program
  • As part of a team, analyze data then determine
    and apply the software applications, integration
    techniques, and additional electronic resources
    needed to develop business documents and/or
    slide-show presentations.

Source Adapted from Ruth Stiehl and Les Lewchuk,
2002, The Outcome Primer
48
Operations -- Example
  • Course Level Assessment Tasks for Graphic Style
    Course in Integrated Office Systems Program
  • Develop portfolio of camera-ready business
    documents using MS-Office Professional
  • Create and present a slide-show capstone project
    to a panel from business community
  • Develop e-mail journal of weekly progress

Source Adapted from Ruth Stiehl and Les Lewchuk,
2002, The Outcome Primer
49
Operations -- Example
  • Course Level Themes, Concepts, and Issues for
    Graphic Style Course in Integrated Office Systems
    Program
  • Themes Professionalism, design and layout,
    integration
  • Concepts Critical thinking, problem solving,
    formatting, word processing, spreadsheet,
    database, presentations, integration techniques,
    E-mail, file management, browsers, peripheral
    equipment (flatbed scanner, color printer, LCD
    panel/projector)
  • Issues Communication, teamwork, proofreading

Source Adapted from Ruth Stiehl and Les Lewchuk,
2002, The Outcome Primer
50
Operations -- Example
  • Course Level Skills for Graphic Style Course in
    Integrated Office Systems Program
  • Develop team structure, roles, charter, schedule
  • Analyze data to determine type of files needed
    for project
  • Use file management to store and locate files
  • Use critical thinking skills to determine
    software applications to be used
  • Use MS-Office Professional applications (Word,
    Excel, Access, PowerPoint) to produce projects

Source Adapted from Ruth Stiehl and Les Lewchuk,
2002, The Outcome Primer
51
Operations -- Example
  • Course Level Skills for Graphic Style Course in
    Integrated Office Systems Program
  • Determine OLE techniques for producing projects.
  • Use good design and layout for business documents
  • Operate additional equipment (scanner, color
    printer) as needed for projects
  • Use E-mail to communicate with team
  • Use E-mail to communicate weekly with instructor.

Source Adapted from Ruth Stiehl and Les Lewchuk,
2002, The Outcome Primer
52
Operations -- Example
  • Course Level Course Outcome Guide (1-2 pp.)

Source Adapted from Ruth Stiehl and Les Lewchuk,
2002, The Outcome Primer
53
Operations -- Components
  • Program Level
  • Intended Outcomes What do students need to be
    able to do out there in life roles for which
    this program prepares them?
  • Capstone Assessment Tasks What can students do
    in this program to show final evidence of the
    intended outcomes?
  • Courses What learning experiences (courses) are
    necessary to prepare the student?
  • Prerequisites What must students be able to do
    before engaging in this work?

Source Adapted from Ruth Stiehl and Les Lewchuk,
2002, The Outcome Primer
54
Operations -- Example
  • Program Level Student Learning Outcomes for
    Telecommunications Program
  • Survey and analyze business needs to determine
    how telecommunications can provide solutions
  • Propose appropriate telecommunications solutions
    to business needs
  • Evaluate the solutions in the context of the
    business setting budget, culture, internal
    resources, external resources, available
    technology
  • Recommend (sell) communication solutions to
    management

Source Adapted from Ruth Stiehl and Les Lewchuk,
2002, The Outcome Primer
55
Operations -- Example
  • Program Level Student Learning Outcomes for
    Telecommunications Program
  • Implement telecommunications solutions within the
    organization
  • Manage telecommunications systems
  • Gather and respond to feedback on
    telecommunications solutions
  • Communicate effectively with customers and
    vendors.

Source Adapted from Ruth Stiehl and Les Lewchuk,
2002, The Outcome Primer
56
Operations -- Example
  • Program Level Capstone Assessment Tasks for
    Telecommunications Program
  • Select an organization and develop a complete
    proposal to management for an overall
    telecommunications system including needs,
    solutions, budget, and resources.
  • Role play (with peers) an oral presentation to
    the Board of Directors of the company and
    respond to questions
  • Prepare an addendum to the proposal that
    addresses the Board of Directors concerns and
    suggestions.

Source Adapted from Ruth Stiehl and Les Lewchuk,
2002, The Outcome Primer
57
Operations -- Example
  • Program Level Courses for Telecommunications
    Program
  • Tel 200 - Survey of Telecommunications
  • Tel 218 Survey of Business Issues for
    Telecommunications Professionals
  • Tel 261 Voice Communications I
  • Tel 265 Voice Communications II
  • Tel 262 Data Communications I
  • Tel 266 Data Communications II
  • Tel 268 Emerging Technologies
  • Tel 256 Planning, Implementing and Operations
  • Tel 267 Integrated Network Systems

Source Adapted from Ruth Stiehl and Les Lewchuk,
2002, The Outcome Primer
58
Operations -- Example
  • Program Level Prerequisites for
    Telecommunications Program
  • Two years work experience in the
    telecommunications or similar field
  • High school diploma
  • Intention to pursue a career in
    telecommunications.

Source Adapted from Ruth Stiehl and Les Lewchuk,
2002, The Outcome Primer
59
Operations -- Example
  • Program Level Program Outcome Guide (1-2 pp.)

Source Adapted from Ruth Stiehl and Les Lewchuk,
2002, The Outcome Primer
60
Operations -- Components
  • Institution Level
  • Intended Outcomes What do students need to be
    able to do out there in life roles for which
    the college prepares them?
  • Assessment Tasks What can students do in here
    to demonstrate the intended outcomes?
  • Programs and Services What learning experiences
    are necessary to include in courses, programs,
    and other services to prepare the students?

61
Operations -- Example
  • Institution Level Student Learning Outcomes for
    College
  • Function in a diffuse and complex environment
  • Work independently and collaboratively
  • Make good decisions
  • Use information
  • Communicate ideas
  • Use technology
  • Solve problems and take advantage of
    opportunities
  • Produce results in an area of endeavor
  • Manage ones own continuous learning

Source George Copa and William Ammentorp, A New
Vision for the Two-Year Institution of Higher
Education, 1997.
62
Operations -- Example
  • Institution Level Institution Outcome Guide
    (1-2 pp.)

63
Operations -- Criteria
  • Student Learning Outcomes for Course Level
  • Begins with action verb
  • Stated in words the stakeholders might use
  • Is a significant statement 1-3 outcomes per
    course
  • Tells what students will be able to do after the
    course
  • Is defined enough to drive the content

Source Adapted from Ruth Stiehl and Les Lewchuk,
2002, The Outcome Primer
64
Operations -- Caveats
  • Learn by getting your feet wet
  • Start small and think big
  • The journey will be yours
  • Manage the energy and commitment
  • Designing learning experiences is more than a
    faculty responsibility, but they must take the
    mantel
  • Embed assessment in the learning experience
  • Institutional capacity building is essential

65
Worthy and Realistic Vision
  • Three Years Out
  • More long term journey than destination
  • Higher level honesty and rigor in college
    self-examination
  • Taking on a more collective responsibility and
    common language for student learning
  • Becoming more skilled in learning from other
    colleges
  • Building a culture of evidence for decisions
    about teaching and learning
  • Recognizing that defining and assessing student
    learning outcomes is some of hardest and most
    important work of the college.

Source Adapted from Kay McClenney, Becoming a
Learning College Milestones along the Way, 2003
66
For More Information
George H. Copa, PhD Professor and Director New
Designs for Learning new School of
Education Oregon State University Phone
541-737-8201 E-mail copag_at_oregonstate.edu Web
site http//newdesigns.oregonstate.edu
Source Accreditation Commission for Community
and Junior Colleges of the Western Association of
Schools and Colleges, June, 2002.
67
References
  • Accreditation Commission for Community and Junior
    Colleges of the Western Association of Schools
    and Colleges. (June, 2002). Commission Standards
    2002. (Available at http//www.accjc.org/documents
    /ACCJC20NEW20STANDARDS.pdf)
  • Copa, G. H., Ammentorp,W. (1997). A new vision
    for the two-year institution of higher education
    Preparing for a changing world. Berkeley, CA
    National Center for Research in Vocational
    Education. (Available at http//newdesigns.oregon
    state.edu/Reports/ANewVision/page1.html
  • Copa, G. H., Ammentorp,W. (1998). New designs
    for the two-year institution of higher education
    Final Report. Berkeley, CA National Center for
    Research in Vocational Education. (Available at
    http//newdesigns.oregonstate.edu/Newpages/reports
    2.html)
  • OBanion, T. (1999). Launching a
    learning-centered college. Phoenix, AZ League
    for Innovation in the Community College and
    PeopleSoft, Inc.
  • Stiehl, R., Lewchuk, L. (2002). The outcomes
    primer Reconstructing the college curriculum.
    Corvallis, OR The Learning Organization.
  • McClenney, K. M. (2003). Becoming a learning
    college Milestones on the journey (Learning
    Abstract). Phoenix, AZ League for Innovation in
    the Community College.
  • Stiehl, R., Lewchuk, L. (2002). The outcomes
    primer Reconstructing the college curriculum.
    Corvallis, OR The Learning Organization.

68
Other Related Sources
  • The Research and Planning Group for California
    Community Colleges Website http//www.rpgroup.org
    -- go to Learning Assessment Listserv.
  • Serban, A. M., Friedlander, J. (Eds.). (2004).
    Developing and implementing assessment of student
    learning outcomes (New Directions for Community
    Colleges, Number 126). San Francisco
    Jossey-Bass.
  • Stiehl, R., Lewchuk, L. (2005). The mapping
    primer Tools for reconstructing the college
    curriculum. Corvallis, OR The Learning
    Organization.
  • Wilson, C. D., Miles, C. L., Baker, R. L.,
    Schoenberger, R. L. (2000). Learning outcomes for
    the 21st century Report of a community college
    study. Phoenix, AZ League for Innovation in the
    Community College and Pew Charitable Trusts.
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