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Coalition for Juvenile Justice

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The Coalition for Juvenile Justice (CJJ), since 1984, has served as the national ... aimed at addressing needs and gaps in the state's juvenile justice system; ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Coalition for Juvenile Justice


1
  • Coalition for Juvenile Justice
  • Leadership Training for
  • State Advisory Group Members
  • June 2007
  • Building Safe Communities
  • One Child at a Time

2
Welcome Introductions
  • The Coalition for Juvenile Justice (CJJ), since
    1984, has served as the national association of
    State Advisory Group Members, as well as allied
    individuals and organizations.
  • CJJ members work collectively to create optimal
    approaches to delinquency prevention and juvenile
    justice, in keeping with the principles and goals
    of the federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
    Prevention Act (JJDPA).
  • CJJ is YOUR RESOURCE and this training program
    designed to meet your expectations and goals.
    Please tell us a bit about who you are and what
    you hope to achieve here today.

3
Session Goals
  • To develop greater understanding of the
    leadership responsibilities and role inherent in
    serving as a State Advisory Group (SAG) member.
  • To develop ideas for improving juvenile justice
    and delinquency prevention programs, policies and
    practices.
  • To enhance your state and local jurisdictions
    compliance with the Core Requirements of the
    JJDPA.
  • To gain insights from your fellow SAG members
    about ways to have a positive impact on juvenile
    justice and delinquency prevention.

4
Juvenile Justice Timeline
  • 1899 The nations first juvenile court opened in
    Cook County, Illinois. For the next 50 years,
    juvenile courts held original jurisdiction for
    all youth under age 18.
  • 1966 Kent v. U.S. the U.S. Supreme Court
    decided that a juvenile court's decision to
    transfer a juvenile into adult criminal court
    requires a hearing and application of standards
    of due process and fair treatment.
  • 1967 In re Gault the U.S. Supreme Court
    determined that juveniles are entitled to due
    process under the 14th Amendment, stating in the
    majority opinion, neither the 14th Amendment
    nor the Bill of Rights is for adults alone.

5
  • 1974 The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
    Prevention Act (JJDPA) is enacted, requiring
    deinstitutionalization of status offenders
    and non-criminal youth (DSO) and separation
    of juvenile delinquents from adult offenders
    (Separation).
  • 1980 The Jail Removal requirement was added to
    JJDPA so that juveniles would be removed
    expediently from adult jails and lockups.
  • 1984 The DMC requirement was added to JJDPA to
    address disproportionately high confinement of
    minority youth in juvenile detention and
    corrections facilities.
  • 2002 JJDPA was reauthorized. Notably the DMC
    requirement was expanded from confinement to
    disproportionate minority contact.

6
Unique FederalState Partnership
  • The JJDPA bridges the Office of Juvenile
  • Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)
  • -- as the federal home for juvenile justice
    programs and policies at the U.S. Department of
    Justice
  • with each state/territory.
  • So, how does this work?
  • Lead Agency
  • Each state/territory designates a state-level
    agency to receive technical and financial
    assistance from OJJDP, to implement JJDPA
    mandates and programs.

7
  • SAG and JJ Specialist
  • The state agency staffs a State Advisory Group
    (SAG) with a Juvenile Justice Specialist. SAG
    members are appointed by each Governor/executive.
  • Three-Year State Plan
  • The SAG and JJ Specialist are responsible for a
    Three-Year State Plan for delinquency prevention
    and juvenile services
  • informed by data
  • designed to fulfill JJDPA core requirements
  • aimed at addressing needs and gaps in the
    states juvenile justice system
  • updated annually and submitted to OJJDP.

8
SAG Composition JJDPA requires that the SAG be
composed as follows
  • Appointed by the Governor/executive from persons
    with training, experience, or special knowledge
    concerning prevention and treatment of juvenile
    delinquency and administration of juvenile
    justice.
  • 15 to 33 members
  • At least one locally-elected official
  • A majority of the members shall not be full-time
    government/public employees (including Chair)
  • One-fifth of all members shall be under age 24
    (when appointed)
  • 3 members shall have been, or shall currently be,
    under the jurisdiction of the juvenile justice
    system

9
SAG Responsibilities JJDPA specifies the
following SAG responsibilities
  • Participate in the development and review of the
    State Three-Year Plan and its annual update.
  • Submit, at least annually, recommendations to the
    Governor/executive and state legislature re
    compliance with JJDPA core requirements and
    programs.
  • Contact and seek regular input from juveniles
    (and families) currently under jurisdiction of
    the juvenile court.
  • Review and comment on grant applications and
    awards review and comment on the progress and
    accomplishments of grant projects, funded with
    JJDPA related funds.

10
SAG Mission Statement
  • SAGs across the nation have developed mission
    statements to clarify their purposes and goals.
  • For example, this is the mission statement of the
    Vermont SAG
  • The mission of the Vermont Children and Family
    Council for Prevention Programs is to advocate
    for and promote healthy children, families, and
    communities, and to eradicate child abuse,
    delinquency, and other forms of violence.

11
Supporting Monitoring Compliance with JJDPA
Core Requirements
  • Each SAG has a legal responsibility to ensure
    that their state/territory, as well as the local
    jurisdictions, comply with the Four JJDPA Core
    Requirements (also called Core Protections).
  • Deinstitutionalization of Status Offenders
    (DSO)
  • Sight and Sound Separation (Separation)
  • Jail Removal
  • Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC)

12
  • Compliance with Core Requirements, continued
  • In its Three-Year State Plan, each State/SAG
    makes a commitment to address compliance with the
    Core Requirements. This may be done by
  • Identifying where, when and why the problem
    exists
  • Collecting data that map problems and connect
    them to potential solutions
  • Conducting on-site inspections and annual
    monitoring of facilities and services
  • Regularly reporting on compliance to the SAG and
    other appropriate state leaders and agencies.


13
Penalty for Being Out of Compliance
20 Reduction in Formula Funds JJDPA requires a
reduction of 20 of a state/territorys Formula
Funds (Title II of JJDPA) allocation in the
subsequent fiscal year, if the state/territory is
deemed to be out of compliance with one of any of
the Four Core Requirements. Dedicating 50 of
Remaining Funds to Compliance In addition, the
state/territory found to be out of compliance
must then dedicate 50 of the remaining Formula
Funds allocation toward actions to restore
compliance.
14

15
Discussion of JJDPA Core Requirements, continued
  • Sight and Sound Separation
  • When children are placed in an adult jail or
    lock-up for any period of time, not matter how
    limited, sight and sound contact with adults is
    prohibited under the JJDPA. The Separation
    provision requires that children cannot be housed
    next to adult cells, share dining halls,
    recreation areas or any other common spaces, or
    be placed in any circumstance that could expose
    them to threats or abuse from adult inmates.
  • What issues related to Separation are occurring
    in your state or jurisdiction?
  • What is the value of such a provision?
  • How could violations be corrected?
  • Note children/youth transferred into adult
    court jurisdiction are not protected by this
    provision.


16
Discussion of JJDPA Core Requirements, continued
  • Adult Jail and Lock-up Removal
  • Jail Removal
  • Under JJDPA, this core requirement provides that
    no juvenile will be detained or confined in any
    jail or lockup for adults, except juveniles who
    are accused of non-status offenses and who are
    detained in such jail or lockup for a period not
    to exceed six hours. The provision does not
    apply to youth tried and/or sentenced in adult
    criminal court.
  • What issues related to Jail Removal are occurring
    in your state or jurisdiction?
  • What is the value of such a provision?
  • How could violations be corrected?

17
Discussion of JJDPA Core Requirements, continued
  • Disproportionate Minority Contact
  • DMC
  • Under JJDPA, states are required to address the
    disproportionately high contact of youth of
    color/minority youth with the juvenile justice
    system, across nine points of contact from
    arrest to detention to adjudication and
    confinement. The DMC provision requires states
    and local jurisdictions to gather data related to
    possible causes of disproportionate minority
    contact and/or racial/ethnic disparities.
  • What issues related to DMC are occurring in your
    state or jurisdiction?
  • What is the value of such a provision?
  • How do you believe that your SAG effectively
    address DMC?

18
JJDPA Federal Support for States
  • The JJDPA charges OJJDP with responsibility to
    provide support to States/Territories to
    faithfully and effectively implement JJDPA core
    requirements, policies and programs.
  • State Representatives in the OJJDP State
    Relations and Assistance Division ensure that
    states
  • Adhere to the formula and block grant program
    guidelines
  • Comply with the four core requirements of the
    JJDPA
  • Obtain technical assistance and training designed
    for SAGs, JJ Specialists, DMC Coordinators and
    Compliance Monitors
  • The Policy Division of OJJDP has a role with
    states regarding Compliance Monitoring and DMC

19
Federal JJDPA Funds for States Each federal
fiscal year, Congress appropriates funds under
JJDPA and related programs that flow from OJJDP
to the states/territories.
20
Title II/Formula Funds Allocations to States
66 2/3 of funds must be granted to
providers/programs addressing the States
delinquency prevention and juvenile justice
priorities
21
Continuum of Care for Youth and Families
Problem Behavior gt Noncriminal Misbehavior gt
Delinquency gt Serious, Violent, and Chronic
Offending
Prevention and Early Intervention Target
Population At-Risk Youth and Families
Graduated Sanctions Target Population Delinquent
Youth and Youth in Re-entry
  • Youth Development Goals
  • Healthy and nurturing families
  • Safe communities
  • School attachment achievement
  • Prosocial peer relations
  • Personal development and life skills
  • Healthy lifestyle choices
  • Youth Rehabilitation Goals
  • Healthy family participation
  • Community reintegration
  • Educational skill development
  • Healthy peer network development
  • Prosocial values behavior
  • Healthy lifestyle choices

22
Continuum of Care for Youth and Families Heres
how the core JJDPA funding streams may apply
Problem Behavior gt Noncriminal Misbehavior gt
Delinquency gt Serious, Violent, and Chronic
Offending
Prevention and Early Intervention Target
Population At-Risk Youth and Families
Graduated Sanctions Target Population
Delinquent Youth and Youth in Re-entry
Title II Formula Grants Program
Title V Prevention Program
JABG Program
EUDL
23
Continuum of Care for Youth and Families It is
wise to consider ways to augment federal funds
Problem Behavior gt Noncriminal Misbehavior gt
Delinquency gt Serious, Violent, and Chronic
Offending
Graduated Sanctions Target Population
Delinquent Youth and Youth in Re-entry
Prevention and Early Intervention Target
Population At-Risk Youth and Families
Federal Grant Funded Programs
State Funded Programs and Services
Local Funding
Other Funding Sources (i.e., Foundations)
24
Input from Local Units of Government (and
ideally community and family leaders, partners
and service providers)
  • JJDPA requires that development of the State
    Three-Year Plan adequately take into account the
    needs and requests of local units of government.
  • The following is an example from the Idaho SAG
    to show how some SAGs do so.

25
  • Idaho District Council Action Plans
  • What is a District Council Action Plan?
  • The Action Plan is a roadmap or blueprint used
    to identify needs, and strategies to address such
    needs, in your District. It provides direction
    for your Council and community members.
  • How does the District Council Action Plan relate
    to the work of the SAG?
  • The Idaho Juvenile Justice Commission (the SAG)
    also uses the seven District Council Action Plans
    as a basis for its Three-Year State Plan under
    JJDPA, submitted to OJJDP.

26
OJJDP Web-based Model Programs Guide
Guidance on sound approaches to address state
needs and compliance issues is housed on an OJJDP
Web site http//dsgonline.com/mpg2.5/mpg_index.ht
m
27
Coalition for Juvenile Justice Web Page
CJJ also provides resources and information of
value to SAGs in setting and meeting goals
www.juvjustice.org
28
Additional Expertise CJJs Resource Bank
  • Visit CJJs Resource Bank www.juvjustice.org/getin
    volved_resources.html
  • Includes hyperlinks to the following Web Sites,
    among others
  • Annie E. Casey Foundation, Juvenile Detention
    Alternatives Initiative, Baltimore, MD Child
    Welfare League of America, Washington,
    DC Council of Juvenile Correctional
    Administrators, Braintree, MA John D. and
    Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Models for
    Change, Chicago, IL Justice Research and
    Statistics Association, Washington, DC Juvenile
    Law Center, Philadelphia, PA National Center for
    Juvenile Justice, Pittsburgh, PA

29
Additional Expertise CJJs Resource Bank
  • Visit CJJs Resource Bank www.juvjustice.org/getin
    volved_resources.html
  • Includes hyperlinks to the following Web Sites,
    among others
  • National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile
    Justice, Delmar, NY National Criminal Justice
    Reference Service, Washington, DC National
    Juvenile Defender Center, Washington,
    DC National Juvenile Justice Network,
    Washington, DC Office of Juvenile Justice and
    Delinquency Prevention, Washington, DC Robert
    Wood Johnson Foundation, Reclaiming Futures,
    Princeton, NJ University of Chicago, Chapin Hall
    Center for Children, Chicago, IL W. Haywood
    Burns Institute, San Francisco, CA

30
Leadership by SAG Members
  • There is always a better way to do it. Find
    it! --Thomas Edison
  • SAG members, nationwide, are effective leaders
    for change and improvement, especially when
    they
  • Advocate for the goals of the JJDPA.
  • Educate legislators and administrators.
  • Assist in writing and delivering the SAGs
    annual report to the Governor and legislature.
  • Review grants for recipients of JJDPA related
    funds.
  • Guard against conflicts of interest.
  • Strategically make grants to address JJDPA
    priorities in your state.

31
  • Stay active on the SAG and in its subcommittees.
  • Form subcommittees on Compliance,
  • DMC, Prevention, and other core concerns.
  • Get to know your key state and federal
    representatives.
  • Become expert in how your state and local
    juvenile justice systems work and compare with
    others around the nation.
  • Examine conditions of confinement go to court
    and tour facilities.
  • Read up, attend state and national conferences
    and training.
  • Sponsor conferences and events.

32
Sign-Up with CJJ
CJJ supports exemplary SAG leadership by
connecting you to support from SAG members and
allies across the United States. We would like
to help you to become as knowledgeable and
proactive as possible. Resources
include Monthly CJJ e-Monitor containing
issue-oriented resources, state and national
juvenile justice news Government relations
alerts on federal policy issues CJJ national
membership directory in print and
on-line Invitations to CJJ Conferences and
Regional Meetings Publications directed to SAG
needs and goals Information and connections to
specific reform programs in your state or region
33
Thank you for joining us today!
  • This presentation is brought to you by
  • Coalition for Juvenile Justice (CJJ)
  • 1710 Rhode Island Ave., NW, 10th Floor
  • Washington, DC 20036
  • See us on the Web www.juvjustice.org
  • Special thanks to
  • Vermont SAG
  • Idaho SAG
  • Alaska SAG
  • OJJDP State Relations and Assistance Division
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