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TSELA CONFERENCE November 2004 Corpus Christi, Texas

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Title: TSELA CONFERENCE November 2004 Corpus Christi, Texas


1
TSELA CONFERENCE November 2004 Corpus Christi,
Texas
  • SCIENCE UPDATE
  • Presented by
  • Chris Castillo-Comer
  • Director of Science

2
  • TODAYS TOPICS
  • Whats New
  • Demographics
  • The Science Initiative
  • TAKS
  • How to Prepare
  • Some Guidelines
  • Resources

3
Whats new
4
The State of Science in Texas
  • The Freshman class of 04 must have three years
    of science to graduate
  • 85 of all 11th graders passed the Exit Level
    Science Assessment
  • 55 of all Texas seniors graduated with the
    Recommended High School Plan
  • The state average for graduating seniors
    attending colleges and universities is 44.6
  • Last year 23 of all graduating seniors took 4
    years of science
  • The number of science teachers have increased in
    all areas
  • The Texas Master Science Teacher program is the
    first of its kind in the nation.

5
Final Rule to Add Fourth Science Mandate to RHSP
and DAP
  • SBOE by Aug. 1, 07 must determine that the
    Legislature has appropriated enough money to pay
    for a fourth-year mandate and that the added
    requirement can be successfully implemented.

6
  • Entering freshmen 2007
  • Graduating class of 2011
  • The total number of graduation credits required
    under both plans remains at 24.
  • ATTACHMENT III--Text of Proposed New 19 TAC
  • Chapter 74. Curriculum Requirements
  • Subchapter F. Graduation Requirements, Beginning
    with School Year 2007-2008
  • 74.63. Recommended High School Program.
  • Science--four credits. One credit must be a
    biology credit (Biology, Advanced Placement (AP)
    Biology, or International Baccalaureate (IB)
    Biology). Students must choose two credits from
    subparagraph (A) and one credit from subparagraph
    (B) of this paragraph to complete the science
    requirement.

7
ATTACHMENT III--Text of Proposed New 19
TAC Chapter 74.
(A) A student must select two credits from the
following areas. Not more than one credit
may be chosen from each of the areas to
satisfy this requirement. (i)Integrated
Physics and Chemistry (IPC) (ii)Chemistry, AP
Chemistry, or IB Chemistry
and (iii)Physics, Principles of
Technology I, AP Physics, or IB
Physics.
8
ATTACHMENT III--Proposed New 19 TAC Chap 74
  • (B)After successful completion of a biology
    course and two credits from IPC, a chemistry
    course,
  • and/or a physics course,
  • a student may select the fourth required credit
    from any of the following courses
  • Geology, Meteorology, and
  • Oceanography (GMO)
  • (ii) Environmental Systems
  • (iii) Aquatic Science
  • (iv) Astronomy
  • (v) Anatomy and Physiology of Human Systems
  • (vi) AP/IB Biology
  • (vii)Chemistry, AP/IB Chemistry
  • (viii)Physics, AP/IB Physics
  • (ix) AP/IB Environmental Science and
  • (x) Scientific Research and Design.

9
Response to Public Commentary
  • The number of responses who favored a fourth year
    of science was gratifying.
  • Many schools will not see an increase in costs
    when implementing the four years of science.
  • Schools will have at least three years to plan
    for the changes and recent rigorous expectations
    have already hastened schools to increase
    laboratory facilities throughout the state.
  • The majority of the science courses that will be
    needed for the fourth credit can be taught by
    teachers with a composite science certification.
  • Most schools have adequate staff with these
    certification requirements already in place.
  • In addition, most of the science courses needed
    for the fourth credit will not require a
    laboratory setting and can be taught in regular
    classrooms.

10
Earth Science in the United States
  • State K-12 9-12
  • California 5,986,872 1,656,111
  • Texas 4,033,697 1,077,158
  • New York 2,873,492 848,976

-States with content standards - 49 -Earth
science (ES) in state standards - 49 -ES counts
for required course credits - 37 -ES content on a
state high school test - 23 -ES content in course
req. for graduation - 8 -ES course required for
graduation - 2 -Grade 9-12 students enrolled in
ES - 7
11
Science Graduation Requirements Freshmen entering
2004
Distinguished Achievement Plan Three Credits
Minimum Plan Two credits
Recommended Plan Three Credits
Advanced Measures Original research/project Test
data3 on AP Exam 4 on IB Exam PSAT score
as Commended Scholar or higher National
Hispanic Scholar or Outstanding Negro Student of
NMSC Dual Credit College courses3.0 gpa
Biology, or AP or IB Biology
IPC
Biology
  • Two Credits from
  • Chemistry, or AP or IB Chemistry
  • Physics, or AP or IB Physics
  • or
  • Principles of Technology I

Students may substitute Chemistry for IPC But
then must use an elective credit for Physics The
Minimum plan can only be used with parental
approval And will not apply for scholarships or
grants
  • Science Electives
  • Chemistry, Physics, Principles of Technology I,
    Aquatic Science, Environmental Systems, AP/IB
    Chemistry, Physics, Environmental Science,
    Geology, Meteorology, and Oceanography (GMO),
    Astronomy
  • Career and Technology Education Science
    Electives
  • Scientific Research and Design, Medical
    Microbiology, Pathophysiology, Anatomy and
    Physiology

C. Comer
12
Science Graduation Requirements Freshmen entering
2007
Distinguished Achievement Advanced
Measures Original research/project Test
data3 on AP Exam 4 on IB Exam PSAT score as
Commended Scholar or higher National Hispanic
Scholar or Outstanding Negro Student of
NMSC Dual Credit College courses3.0 gpa
Recommended and Distinguished Plans Four Credits
Minimum Plan Two credits
Biology, or AP or IB Biology
IPC
  • Two Credits from
  • Chemistry, or AP or IB Chemistry
  • Physics, or AP or IB Physics
  • or
  • Principles of Technology I

Biology
Students may substitute Chemistry for IPC But
then must use an elective credit for Physics The
Minimum plan can only be used with parental
approval And will not apply for scholarships or
grants
One Required Credit Chemistry, Physics,
Principles of Technology I, Aquatic Science,
Environmental Systems, AP/IB Chemistry, Physics,
Environmental Science, Geology, Meteorology, and
Oceanography (GMO), Astronomy Career and
Technology Education Science Courses Scientific
Research and Design, Anatomy and Physiology
C. Comer
13
Mathematics TEKS Edits 04 Discussion Points with
Science
  • Modelmath may use word model to (1)mean
    concrete objectse.g. sphere, or as verb, or (2)
    to model a phenomena. Science uses only 2.
  • Massweight has been used incorrectly
  • Metric vs. customary units
  • Densitycapacity (volume) and its relationship to
    mass should be established by Gr. 4
  • When to teach line graphs
  • Science TEKS Revisions scheduled for 07

14
Demographics and what they tell us
15
U.S. Demographic Trends 1990-2000 Population
Change
16
U.S. Demographic Trends
  • 1 million new legal immigrants per year
  • Increasing population
  • 1990 (248 million)
  • 2020 (325 million)
  • 2050 (404 million)
  • 2100 (571 million)
  • Aging Population (Median Age 35 to 38 by 2020)
  • Changing Ethnicities (by 2050)
  • Anglo Americans (76 to 50)
  • African Americans (12 to 15)
  • Hispanic Americans (9 to 21)
  • Asian Americans (4 to 11)

17
Texas Demographics Texas Population (by county)
18
Texas Demographics Persons Per Square Mile
19
Texas Demographic Trends
  • Increasing population
  • 1990 (16, 986,335)
  • 2000 (20,851,820)
  • Estimate for 2030 (33,912,528)
  • Numerical Increase 3,865,485
  • Percent Increase 22.8
  • Aging Population (Median Age 35 to 38 by 2020)
  • How did we get all of these people?
  • 23 International Migration
  • 19 Domestic Migration
  • 58 Natural Increase

20
Increased Urbanization
  • 41 of the population of Texas lives in 4
    counties on 1.8 of the dry land.
  • 50 of the population of Texas lives in 7
    counties on 3.2 of the dry land.
  • 80 of the population of Texas lives in 40
    counties on 15 of the dry land.
  • Science educators need to help connect their
    students to nature!

21
Changing Ethnicities Texas
22
Three-Year 157,420 Increase Largest in Texas
History
157,420
Texas Students Enrolled in Higher Education
23
88,000 More Students Enrolled at Two-Year
Colleges
Health-Related
1
  • Two-year colleges enrolled 56 of the increased
    number of students

Two-Year College
University
Independent
24
Trends in Course Enrollment
Grade Level Student
Count____ Early Education 27,571
Pre-kindergarten 166,579 Kindergarten
323,502 First Grade 338,727 Second
Grade 325,943 Third Grade 323,373 Fourth
Grade 321,788 Fifth Grade 324,046 Sixth
Grade 327,093 Seventh Grade 329,560
Eighth Grade 324,316 Ninth Grade 375,358
Sophomore Year 309,187 Junior Year
267,682 Senior Year 243,303 For a
total of 4,328,028 students.
25
Trends in Course Enrollment
26
Science Class Enrollment
27
Large increases in the percent of entering
students with the Recommended or Above Curriculum
78
73
65
53
55
53
28
Texas sends fewer students to higher education
compared to other states.
Source Measuring Up 2002 9th graders in higher
ed after 4 years.
29
2005 Hispanic Target Remains a Challenge
Asians are not targeted in the plan.
30
The Texas Science Initiative
Sensr Grants After school Grants Online
Assessment Pilot
31
The Texas Science Initiative
Completed Contracts
1. University of Texas/TEXAS REGIONAL
COLLABORATIVES 600 Teacher Mentors Trained
in Elementary Science Professional Development
Academies 2. TEA/TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION
COORDINATING BOARD (THECB) Teacher Quality
Grants gr.6-12 at 5.6 million 36 Contracts
with over 30 Colleges and Universities and 6
ESCs 3. GIRLSTART PROGRAM Encouraging
science careers for girls and historically
underserved children
32
The Texas Science Initiative
On-Going Contracts
4. TEA Assessment/Curriculum TAKS Middle
School Science Assessment at Grade 8 by 05-06 5.
TEA/SBEC Master Science Teacher Certification
K-12 6. TEA/ESC 12 Materials Grants for IPC
for low SES districts 7. Charles A. Dana Center
TEXTEAMS Academies Bio, IPC (Chemistry, Physics)
33
The Texas Science Initiative
Future Contracts
8. TEA/TAMU Leadership Grant to convene
groups 9. TEA Texas ASAP Grants Summer and
After School Science Programs SESnet Meeting in
Austin January 23 05 TUSC Meeting in
Austin January 24 05 10. Science Diagnostic
Tools 11. TEA/LCRA STRANDS and PARKnerships
Projects
34
New Middle School TAKS Grade 8 Information
Booklets now on TEA website
  • New Objectives and TEKS that will target by the
    Middle School TAKS at Grade 8
  • Periodic Table and simple formulas
  • Conversions for reference
  • TEST Framework included
  • Field Test
  • New Testing Calendar 06 Science TAKS at Grade
    8 on Wednesday instead of Thursday.

Middle School Grade 8
35
Becoming a Master Science Teacher Includes
5,000 stipend
  • Administered by SBEC
  • THREE LEVELS for Certification EC-4 4-8 8-12
  • Framework for TExMaT is online for your review
  • www.sbec.state.tx.us
  • Educator Standards identify unifying concepts
    across teaching levels and provide a
    breakdown of content appropriate to each of the
    teaching levels in the areas of Life, Earth and
    Physical Science, as
    well as
  • History, Nature and Context of Science
  • Processes of Science Inquiry and Problem Solving
  • Classroom, Lab and Field Safety
  • Science specific pedagogy
  • Assessment of Students
  • Peer Mentoring

Want to be part of the process?
Email Cynthia.maxwell_at_sbec.state.tx.us
36
NEW! 200,000 Grants for STRANDS Project and
Texas Parks and Wildlife PARK-NERSHIPS
Project RFPs to go out mid-spring 05 Also new
Texas Science Grants for After School Programs
to accelerate student achievement RFPs to go out
soon!
37
Teacher Quality Grants
  • Joint effort between TEA and the Texas Higher
    Education Coordinating Board, with two types of
    awards for 04-05.
  • Type A Teacher Quality grants are awards at
    300,000 for the development of uniform, teacher
    training modules for the mathematics and science
    courses for teachers of grades 6 12.  These
    modules were given the SBOE seal of approval
    after review.
  • A total of 6 awards (for a total of 3.6 million)
    for modules Middle School Science Parts I
    (grades 6-7) and II (Grade 8) Biology,
    Chemistry, Physics, and IPC.

38
Science Teacher Quality Module Development Type
A 300,000 Grant Recipients
IPC MODULE Dr. Andrea Foster University of
Houston COE - Dept of Curr 256 Farish Hall
Houston, Tx77204-5027 PH 713-743-4951 FAX
713-743-4951 asfoster_at_uh.edu CHEMISTRY
MODULE Dr. Bob Blake Texas Tech University MS
1061Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry 2607
20th St. Lubbock, TX 79410 PH
806-742-4200 FAX 806-742-1289 bob.blake_at_ttu.edu
BIOLOGY MODULE Dr. Molly Weinburgh Texas
Christian University Box 297920 Fort Worth, TX
76129 PH 817-257-6115 FAX 817-257-5525 m.Weinb
urgh_at_tcu.edu PHYSICS MODULE Dr. Jim
Barifaldi University of Texas Science Education
Center SZB 340 Austin, TX 78712-1294 PH
512-471-9460 FAX 512-471-9244 kjbeily_at_mail.utexa
s.ed
  • GRADE 6-7 MODULE
  • Dr. Sandra West
  • Texas State University
  • 601 University Dr
  • San Marcos, TX 78666
  • PH 512-245-3360
  • FAX 512-245-8713
  • sw04_at_txstate.edu
  • GRADE 8 MODULE
  • Dr. Linda Hodges
  • University of North Texas
  • P O Box 305280
  • Denton, TX 76203-5280
  • Ph 940-565-4450
  • Fax 940-565-4425
  • Lhodges_at_coe.unt.edu

Each presented three TOT sessions in 04
39
               
Type B 80,000 Grants Round One Held Summer
04
40
Type B Grants 80,000 Second Round Held
from fall 04 to end of Summer 05
  • Abilene Christian University-Chemistry
  • Blinn College-Grade 8
  • Jarvis Christian College-Gr. 67
  • Lamar University-Biology
  • Our Lady of the Lake University-Physics
    Chemistry
  • Rice University-Gr. 67
  • Texas AM University, Commerce-Chemistry
  • Texas AM University-Texarkana-IPC
  • Texas Christian University-Biology
  • Texas State University-Gr. 67
  • Texas Tech University-Chemistry
  • Texas Wesleyan University-Gr. 67
  • University of Houston-Victoria-IPC Gr. 67
  • University of North Texas-Gr. 67Gr. 8Physics
  • University of Texas at Arlington-Physics
  • University of Texas at Dallas-Gr. 6-7 IPC
  • University of Texas at Tyler-Gr. 67
  • University of Texas-Pan American-Physics
  • University of the Incarnate Word-Gr. 8IPC

41
Example of class summary report teachers can
create after administering a diagnostic to
students. Report summarizes individual student
performance by Science strand and aggregate class
performance
The Texas Science Portal And Diagnostic has been
funded!
42
GirlStart Program
  • Encourage females to take rigorous science
    courses that will lead to science careers
  • Provide professional development for pre-service
    and in-service teachers and provide technology to
    support improved science instruction
  • 400-500 In-service Teacher Training at
  • CAST and 3 area Mini-casts
  • 400-500 Pre-service Teacher Training at
  • San Antonio, Dallas, El Paso, and Houston areas
    in cooperation with IHE
  • Service to children at 10 statewide events

43
Teacher Quality Grants for Elementary Teachers
through the Texas Regional Collaboratives 2.2
Million Dollars
20 Area Trainings Elementary Workshops
Bridging II TAKS Module 2 Tools to Teach
Science
Professional Development Academies for Elementary
Teachers
44
University of Texas Charles A. Dana Center
  • NEW! TEA SCIENCE Funding 1.9 Million
  • TEXTEAMS ACADEMIES FOR HIGH SCHOOLS ACROSS THE
    STATE
  • MS TAKS Chart and Formula Chart at CAST
  • Also will unveil MS TEKS Charts
  • Grant Awardees First Round
  • 95 Districts
  • Spur ISD, Lisa Leech ESC 1
  • North Central Texas
  • ESC VII
  • Gainesville, TX
  • OLLU, Peggy Carnahan
  • Victoria, TX
  • ESC 12
  • Little Cypress, TX
  • Mesquite, TX Joel Palmer
  • Beaumont, TX

Grant Awards for Round 2 announced in November
45
TAKS How We Performed
46
How We Did Overall
Science
47
2003-2004 Elementary Science Percent of Average
Items Correct
03 Commended Performance 4 04
Commended Performance 16
OBJECTIVES 2003 2004 1
Nature of Science 76 83 2 Life Sciences
74 79 3 Physical Sciences 66 74 4
Earth Sciences 53 60
48
Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills Spring
05 Performance Standards English-Version TAKS
GRADE 5 BLUEPRINT
49
Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills TAKS
GRADE 8 BLUEPRINT
50
03-04 HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE Average Items Correct
By Objective
51
Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills Spring
2005 Performance Standards TAKS HIGH SCHOOL
BLUEPRINT
52
What you need to know to prepare for the Science
TAKS
53
Putting the Pieces Together Administrators and
Leaders Should
  • Serve as an advocate for student success in
    science
  • Provide funds and resources for science
    materials,
  • Equipment and Consumables
  • Serve as a broker for professional development
    based on student data
  • Facilitate curriculum alignment, selection and/or
    development based on TEKS
  • Set goals for the science program, include in the
    Campus Plan and monitor progress
  • Coach teachers and provide mentoring and time for
    planning and sharing best strategies
  • Troubleshoot problems
  • Anticipate more students taking more science

54
Elementary Science TAKS
  • PASSING RATE 05 at PANEL RECOMMENDATION 30/40
    Items
  • No Release of Tests Scheduled for 05
  • Updated version of ARD Manual is now on Student
    Assessment Website
  • Spanish TAKS Changes
  • Last year for Trans-Adaptation is 05
  • Spanish Science TAKS begins
  • separate item development and
  • separate field test

55
Whats New in the Revised TAKS Information
Booklets?
  • Separate booklets
  • No SDAA for TAKS Science at any grade.
    Therefore, the ARD committee can recommend that a
    student take the grades 5,8,10 and exit level, if
    appropriate.
  • If the ARD determines that the TAKS Science tests
    are not appropriate for a student, then the
    student may be exempt.
  • Exempt students must take a LDAA
  • LDAA e.g. portfolio, modified released test.

56
Revised Science TAKS
Information Booklets
  • EMPHASIS on teaching ALL Student Expectations
  • Objective 1
  • precise measurementse.g. cylinders that are
    graduated triple-beam balances, lengths in
    centimeters.
  • Scientific processes should be taught as part of
    integrated units
  • Mapping skills are necessary
  • Accuracy Repeated trials may increase
    reliability of results

57
Elementary Science TAKS Revised Information
Booklets
  • Objective 2
  • Emphasis on Organisms do not consciously adapt
    to their environment. Instead, genetic
    variations allow for adaptations that may or may
    not be an advantage
  • Arrow direction in Food Web.
  • Objective 3
  • Students need hands-on experience with magnets.
  • Recognize that a circuit is a system with many
    parts

58
Elementary Science TAKS Revised Information
Booklets
  • Objective 4
  • Students will be expected to be familiar with
    physical characteristics of Earth and the moon,
    but they will not always be expected to compare
    them.
  • Examples of flow in 5.11(A) might include mud,
    lava, ice, or water.
  • TAKS uses the nine-planet system with planets in
    their relative orbital positions from Sun.
  • Objects in the skye.g. planets, comets, stars,
    clouds, lightning.

59
Preliminary Cumulative Pass Rate-Grade 11 Exit
Level Spring 2004-July 2004
  • Percent of 11th Grade Students Who Met Standard
    in Spring 04
  • ELA89
  • Mathematics-87
  • Social Studies-98
  • Science-88
  • All Tests Taken-78
  • Percent of 11th Grade Students Who Met Standard
    in July 04
  • ELA 47
  • Mathematics 38
  • Social Studies 71
  • Science 49

60
TAKS July 2004 Administration
  • Number of
  • Students Tested
  • ELA..15,487
  • Mathematics...18,146
  • Social Studies..3,984
  • Science18,530
  • More 11th Grade students retook the Science Exit
    Level TAKS than any other subject area.
  • July 2004 Retest in Science
  • Of the 18,530 students retested
  • 6,812 were male
  • 11,699 were female

61
Science TAKS
  • No Release of Tests Scheduled for 05
  • Update Version of ARD Manual is now on Student
    Assessment Website
  • The TAKS science assessments will include two
    griddable items one live and one field tested
  • Students may see GRIDDABLE ITEMS in questions
    from ALL Objectives
  • Students will be expected to know and make
    measurements from the equipment listed in TEKS
    4(A) in Grades K-8.
  • Field experiences may include
  • On-going field investigations
  • Field trips
  • School grounds indoors and outdoors.

62
Middle School TAKS
  • Includes SEs from Grades 6, 7, 8
  • 5 Objectives
  • A Periodic Table
  • A Formula Chart
  • New Contractor for Items
  • Assessed in Spring 2006
  • Field Test this Spring!

63
Why Is a Strong Science Program Important in
Middle School?
  • Critical knowledge and skills are introduced in
    Middle School
  • Conceptual strands are brought to logical
    conclusion in Middle School
  • Success on Exit Level Assessments depends on
    Middle School
  • Student Retention depends on Middle School

64
Critical Knowledge and SkillsIn Grade 6 Students
Are
  • Introduced to chemical change
  • Working with laboratory equipment like beakers,
    test tubes and field equipment such as telescopes
    and computer probes for the first time
  • Using percent, average, range, and frequency and
    applying these in identifying patterns in
    collected information
  • Applying concepts of force and motion geologic
    events including volcanic activity and uplifting

65
At 7th Grade, Students
  • Study potential and kinetic energy
  • Are introduced to photosynthesis
  • Lay the foundation for genetics and homeostasis
  • Learn how compounds are different from elements
  • Investigate ecological succession

66
8th Grade students
  • Learn Interactions among solar, weather, and
    ocean systems
  • Are introduced to specific heat
  • Investigate Exothermic and Endothermic reactions
  • Can describe Interdependence in Systems

67
At The Middle School Level Students Should
Collect, Analyze, and Record Information Using
Tools Including .
  • Beakers
  • Petri dishes
  • Meter Sticks
  • Graduated cylinders
  • Weather instruments
  • Hot plates
  • Spring scales
  • Magnets
  • Microscopes
  • Telescopes
  • Field equipment

and this is NOT the complete list!
68
Keep in Mind.
  • Maps and Interpretation of Maps
  • Importance of Minerals in understanding
    weathering, erosion, deposition and natural
    resources
  • All students are expected to have experience with
    equipment and supplies in TEKS 8.4(A), as well as
    7.4(A) and 6.4(A)
  • Additional Process Skillse.g. TEKS 8.4
    (B)Extrapolation

69
Teachers should know that
  • The SYSTEMS Strand culminates at the Middle
    school level
  • Watersheds
  • Introduction to Chemical Properties and Compounds
  • Formulas and Equations
  • Simple Machines
  • Kinetic and Potential energy

70
Students Will Need to Learn About
  • Surface Water and Groundwater
  • The cause of Seasons and the length of the day
  • Predicting results of modifying Earths nitrogen,
    water, and carbon cycles
  • Earths Geologic history
  • Extinction
  • Lunar Cycles

71
IT IS IMPORTANT TO NOTE
  • Grade 8 is the culmination of the Strands that
    began in elementary school
  • Earth Science will now be tested through grade 8
  • The middle school TEKS provide the FOUNDTION for
    the Biology, Chemistry and
  • Physics concepts ALL students must know to get
    their diploma
  • We MUST Teach the Middle School TEKS In Depth

72
Exit Level Science TAKS
  • The terms litmus paper pH paper or pH
    meter may be seen on items with background
    information.
  • Scientific Observation is a complex skill,
    including
  • Use of multiple senses, when appropriate
  • Importance on multiple observations, observations
    over time
  • Focus on dependent variable

73
Exit Level Science TAKS
  • Questions on TEKS 3A may include analysis or
    evaluation of established scientific theories
    situations in everyday life student
    investigations current science.
  • Objective 2 questions may present students with
    situations involving current events in genetics,
    such as genetic fingerprinting, etc.

74
Exit Level Science TAKS Keep in Mind
  • Connections between ecology, genetics and
    evolution.
  • Humans may be part of food chains, webs.
  • Newtons Laws may include the Law of Universal
    Gravitation
  • Impact of energy sources on the environment may
    include solar cells, fossil fuels, rechargeable
    batteries, wind power, hydrogen, hydroelectric or
    geothermal.

75
Whats New in the TAKS Information Booklets?
  • If the ARD determines that the TAKS Science tests
    are not appropriate for a student, then the
    student may be exempt.
  • Exempt students must take a LDAA
  • LDAA e.g. portfolio, modified released test.
  • Separate booklets
  • No SDAA for TAKS Science at any grade.
    Therefore, the ARD committee can recommend that a
    student take the grades 5,8,10 and exit level, if
    appropriate.

76
Grade 10
  • Objective 1
  • Students may be asked to apply basic earth/space
    science concepts to questions
  • Objective 2
  • Be familiar with carbohydrates, fats, and
    proteins, and their role in living systems
  • Objective 3
  • Some plant and animal diseases caused by bacteria
    and viruses. Background information is usually
    given

77
Grade 10 and Exit Level
  • Limited English proficient (LEP) students can be
    exempted from the grade 10 test.
  • But LEP students can receive only a one-time
    postponement from Exit-level.
  • Beginning in the 2004-05 school year, all
    students will take 3 years of science.
  • Importance of Interdisciplinary units on student
    retention of information.

78
Exit Level
  • Objectives 1, 3, 5
  • Same as Gr. 10
  • Objective 2
  • Use Punnett squares and probability to find
    possible genotypes and phenotypes. Predict
    possible genotypes involving sex-linked traits
    and multiple alleles.
  • Objective 4
  • EMPHASIS on use of periodic table and on factors
    that affect solutions
  • Calculate density and apply it to buoyancy,
    density columns, substance identification
  • .

79
What Should Teachers Remember About Helping
Students be Prepared for Gr. 10 11 TAKS?
  • Bio 4 Dstudents need to know that bacteria cause
    disease by producing toxins
  • IPC 6Fyou may see both light bulbs and batteries
    in both series and parallel circuits
  • IPC6Ayou may see energy in an ecosystem in IPC

80
Some Guidelines
81
What Do We Know About Student Achievement?
Nationally 12th Grade Achievement In Math and
Science is UpSomewhat
82
High School Achievement Math and Science
Source NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress.
83
TIMSS
Source NCES 1999-081R, Highlights From TIMSS
84
PISA US 15 Year-Olds Rank Near Middle Of The
Pack Among 32 Participating Countries
85
1. Can we agree on a single, overarching goal
for high school that will give clearer purpose,
focus to our reform efforts?
So, What To Do?
Four questions to help frame our improvement
efforts.
86
Kids and Parents are Clear Their Goal is
College
SourceMetropolitan Life, Survey of the American
Teacher 2000 Are We Preparing Students for the
21st Century?, September 2000.
87
Indeed, Most High School Grads Do Go On To
Postsecondary Within 2 Years
Source NELS 88, Second (1992) and Third (1994)
Follow up in, USDOE, NCES, Access to
Postsecondary Education for the 1992 High School
Graduates, 1998, Table 2.
88
Thats Good, Because Education Pays Annual
Earnings of 25-34 yr-olds by Attainment, 2001
Source US bureau of Labor Statistics and Bureau
of the Census, Current Population Survey, March
2002
89
But Many of Those College Freshmen Not
Preparedand Do Not Return for Sophomore Year
Source Tom Mortensen, Postsecondary Opportunity,
No. 89, November 1999
90
To break through
  • ALL students must graduate from high school ready
    for postsecondary education.
  • 2. It is increasingly clear that student
    success--in college, on assessments, and in
    gaining access to decent jobs--depends on
    completing a rigorous, college prep-level
    curriculum.

91
Transcript Study single biggest predictor of
college success is QUALITY AND INTENSITY OF HIGH
SCHOOL CURRICULUM
  • Cliff Adelman, Answers in the Tool Box, U.S.
    Department of Education.

92
Even Bottom Quartile Students Gain More From
College Prep Courses
Grade 8-grade 12 test score gains based on 8th
grade achievement.
Source USDOE, NCES, Vocational Education in the
United States Toward the Year 2000, in Issue
Brief Students Who Prepare for College and
Vocation
93
Challenging Curriculum Also Results in Lower
Failure Rates, Even for Lowest Achievers
Ninth-grade English performance, by high/low
level course, and eighth-grade reading
achievement quartiles
Source SREB, Middle Grades to High School
Mending a Weak Link. Unpublished Draft, 2002.
94
Requirements for tool and Die Makers Four or
five years of apprenticeship and/or postsecondary
training Algebra, geometry, trigonometry and
statistics Average earnings 40,000 per year.
And theyll be better prepared for the workplace
  • Requirements for sheet Metal Workers
  • Four or five years of apprenticeship
  • Algebra, geometry, trigonometry and technical
    reading

95
3. Organizing Time and Staff in Pursuit of
Different Outcomes
96
Classes in High Poverty High Schools More Often
Taught by Underqualified Teachers
Teachers who lack a major or minor in the
field Source National Commission on Teaching and
Americas Future, What Matters Most Teaching for
Americas Future (p.16) 1996.
97
Students in Low Track Classes Are More Often
Taught by Under-qualified Teachers
Source Ingersoll, The Problem of Underqualified
Teachers in American Secondary Schools
Educational Researcher, Vol. 28, No 2 (March
1999) pp. 26-37
98
The Full Year Calendar
Time
99
Less Summer Vacation
100
Less Weekends, Holidays, Summer Vacation
101
Less Professional Development Days Early
Dismissal/Parent Conferences
102
Less Class Picnic, Class Trip, Thanksgiving
Feast, Christmas, Kwanzaa, Hannukkah, Awards,
Assembles, Concerts
103
Less State and District Testing
104
Bottom Line
Time and Staff
  • Roughly 13-15 Eight-Hour Days Per Subject Per
    Year!

Lets get our teachers into quality professional
development Lets align our time and effort to
intellectually engage all students With
effective inquiry activities and stop teaching
what is not effective!
105
4. Are there better ways to accelerate our top
students?
  • Fastest growing part of the high school
    curriculum? AP/IB (college-level) courses
  • Lets get more kids into more rigorous courses!

106
Resources for Success
107
www.tea.state.tx.us/list/
  • Searching for the latest information in Science
    and Student Assessment?
  • Join the list serve today!

108
Safety and Facility Resources Should be in every
school library!
Also available online www.tenet.edu/teks/science/
safety
109
Library Resources
www.nsta.org
www.aaas.org
These national science documents help you find
background information on the content that is
contained in the TEKS.
110
Recommended Science Resources
PHYSICS Science Traveler
  • Who is this for
  • 10th Graders not taking IPC
  • 11th Graders needing review of physics concepts
  • Students not successful on Objective 5
  • Educators who want to integrate biology and
    chemistry with physics
  • Anyone wanting to refresh their physics knowledge
  • www.texassciencecenter.org

111
(No Transcript)
112
STATE FINALISTS 04 Elementary Division
Kay Stanson 6th Gr. Teacher Woodlake Hills
Judson ISD Science Supervisor Christy
Scott
Mimi Halferty 2nd Gr. Teacher Joe Dan Mills
Elem. Austin ISD Science
Supervisor Barbara ten Brink
Lonna Sanderson 3rd Gr. Teacher Will Davis Elem.
Austin ISD
Science Supervisor Barbara Ten Brink
04-05 Gr. 7-12 Teachers Apply www.nsf.gov/PA
113
PAEMST 03
www.paemst.org
National Texas Awardee Gail Bromily-McGee
Please nominate excellent teachers 05 Grades
7-12 science
114
Who to Contact
  • TEA Science Staff
  • Chris Castillo-Comer
  • Director of Science
  • ccomer_at_tea.state.tx.us
  • Irene Pickhardt
  • Assistant Director
  • ipickhar_at_tea.state.tx.us

512-463-9581
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