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Title: DEVELOPING YOUR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN 2 Sources of


1
DEVELOPING YOUR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN
2
Dick Spohr NCA Ambassador 21712 Oak Road Atwater,
IL 62572 (217) 854-5238 dspohr_at_motion.net
3
2 Sources of Information
  • Illinois NCA CASI State Office nca.uillinois.edu
    Susie Morrison, State Dir.
  • NCA CASI Tempe, Az ncacasi.org Ken
    Gose, Executive Dir.

4
Housekeeping Matters
  • Creature comforts
  • Adult Learning Experience
  • Audience participation required
  • Relax, learn, and enjoy

5
Todays Conversation
  • What is NCA?
  • How are NCA members different?
  • What makes school improvement planning effective?
  • How can an effective school improvement plan be
    developed?

6
AGENDA
  • 900-1015 NCA, SIP, Profile
  • 1015-1030 Break
  • 1030-1145 Profile, Environ. Scan and Goals
  • 1145-100 Lunch (working)
  • SIP Elements
  • 100-110 Break
  • 110-200 Logistics and Process Recomm
    ended Next Steps Evaluation

7
COMMISSION ON ACCREDITATION AND SCHOOL
IMPROVEMENT
8
North Central Association
  • Commission on Higher Education
  • Chicago, Illinois
  • One Centralized
  • Office
  • Commission on Accreditation and School
    Improvement(K-12)
  • Tempe, Arizona
  • Offices in 19 states, the Navajo Nation and
    DoDDS.

9
North Central Association
New England
ND
MN
Northwest
SD
WI
Middle States
WY
MI
NE
IA
IND.
IL
OH.
North Central
IN
CO
WV
KS
MO
NN
OK
AR
Western
AZ
NM
AZ
Southern
East Team Central Team West Team
10
  • NCA CASI member schools Commit to
    Higher Standards and complete a yearly review
    of membership and improvement criteria
    (On-line Report)
  • Engage in a documented cycle of school
    improvement (SIP) External Peer
    Review (Documentation/Accreditation Visit)

11
7 Standards 56 Indicators
  • Vision and Purpose
  • Governance and Leadership
  • Teaching and Learning
  • Documenting and Using Results
  • Resources and Support Systems
  • Stakeholder Communications Relationships
  • Commitment to Continuous Improvement

12
The Process ofSchool Improvement
13
ImprovementSTUDY PLANACT DO
14
Performance Accreditation(PA)
  • The NCA CSI School Improvement framework.
  • A school may select to use a different protocol
    such as ISBE, High Schools That Work, Steps to
    Success, etc.
  • Bottom Line Schools must improve the performance
    of their students. Results are determined by
    performance and improvement.

15
Performance Accreditation Protocol
16
Protocol
Continuous School Improvement
Phases
Gaining Commitment
1.
Getting Started
2.
Collecting and Analyzing Data
3.
4.
5.
Implement Improvement Plan
6.
7.
Continue the Process
8.
17
The Bigger Picture
Record Improvements in a Documentation Report
Implement the School Improvement Plan
Baseline Data

Action Plan
Conduct an Environmental Scan and Identify
Beliefs
G o a l s
Design a School Improvement Plan
Mission Statement
Assessments
Interventions
Collect, Categorize, and Analyze Data and
Identify Implications

School Profile Document
18
NCA Protocol PA
Phase I Making or Renewing the Commitment Phase
II Getting Started Phase III Collecting and
Analyzing Data Phase IV Developing the
Mission Statement and Selecting Appropriate
Goals Phase V Developing the School
Improvement Plan Phase VI Implementing the
School Improvement Plan Phase VII Monitoring
the Implementation of the School Improvement
Plan and Documenting Student Success Phase
VIII Continuing the Process
Year 1
First Chair Contact/Visit
Year 2
First Peer Review Team Visit
Years 3, 4, 5
Peer Review Documentation Visit
19
PROTOCOL COMPARISON
  • ISBE
  • Performance Targets
  • School Information
  • Data Collection and Information
  • Data Analysis
  • Family Community Inv.
  • Action Plan
  • Professional Development
  • Ill Learning Standards Implementation
  • Support Systems
  • Review, Monitor, Revise
  • PA
  • Commit
  • Get Started
  • Collect/Analyze Data
  • Mission/Goals
  • Develop SIP
  • Implement/Monitor
  • Document Results
  • Act on Findings

20
Elements of Effective School Improvement
  • Data Collection (Profiling and Scanning)
  • Mission
  • Goal Setting (Performance Targets)
  • Interventions (Strategies)
  • Assessments
  • Professional Development
  • Monitoring
  • Documentation of Results

21
Developing the Profile
22
School Improvement Concept
  • Profile

A concise, stand-alone document which gives a
snapshot or picture of a school in data terms as
a cycle of school improvement begins.
23
Profiling Tasks
Step 1 Gather Data
Step 2 Sort Your Data into Categories
Step 3 Identify Implications
School Improvement Plan

Categories of Data
Compendium (Compilation of Data)
  • Unique Local Insights
  • Former Students
  • Students
  • Instruction
  • Community

Goals Assessments Interventions Action Plan
24
Findings
  • A simple presentation of the data without making
    judgments.

25
Analysis
  • Collect Data
  • Sort Data
  • Present Data (Findings)
  • Analyze Data
  • Trying to determine and describe why.

26
Implications
  • Student Performance Goals
  • Did our analysis indicate a need for a goal that
    will increase student performance?
  • Non-Student Performance Goals
  • Did our analysis indicate that areas other than
    student performance may need to be addressed?
  • Other Data To Be Collected
  • Did our analysis indicate that we did not have
    enough data to make a decision? If so, what other
    data must we collect?
  • Clarification of Goals
  • Did our analysis provide us with specific areas
    of concern or was it too general?
  • Identification of Intervention Groups
  • Did our analysis indicate that certain groups of
    students might benefit from one intervention,
    while other students might need different
    interventions?
  • Other Actions Needed Did our analysis indicate
    other actions than those above are necessary?

27
Disaggregation Categories
  • After data has been collected, determine
    categories for disaggregation. (NCLB plus?)

28
Disaggregation of Data
Disaggregations
  • Gender
  • Ethnicity
  • Socio-economic status
  • Quartiles
  • Family Structures/Design
  • Mobility Factors
  • Title I
  • ESL
  • Rural vs. Urban

29
To be blind is bad, but worse it is to have eyes
and not to seeHellen Keller
30
Profile
  • What is the MUST HAVE data that a school should
    collect for EACH category?
  • Plan a visual display for one of these.

Table Activity
31
Environmental Scan
32
Environmental Scanning
  • Environmental scan data is information about
    society and the world that a faculty may use to
    determine what skills and knowledge students will
    need to be successful after leaving their school.

Current definition in NCA CASI material
33
  • The scan helps us understand the world in which
    our school may exist at various times in the
    future, and how we may have to adapt to be
    successful in such a new world.

34
The Scan
  • Pulls together key trends and predictions from
    good sources to give us a sense of the range of
    possible futures we may see.

35
Aguilar (study of the information gathering
practices of managers) defines scanning as the
systematic collection of external information in
order to (1) lessen the randomness of
information flowing into the organization and
(2)provide early warning for managers of changing
external conditions.
36
Some Areas to Scan
  • Demographic trends in population
  • Employment
  • Technology
  • Human Resources
  • Workforce
  • Work Environment
  • Health Care
  • Legislation
  • Socioeconomics
  • Income Projections
  • Public Attitudes

37
Some Sources of Scan Information
  • Review current literature
  • Search the internet
  • Hold discussions with experts
  • Interview major decision makers regarding their
    view of the most critical trends and developments
    that could affect the institution.

38
Future Work
  • www.dol.gov/dol/asp/public/futurework/ report
  • Provides a school with environmental scan data in
    the following categories
  • Workforce
  • Employment
  • Wages and benefits
  • Work and family
  • Workplace
  • Workplace conditions
  • Technology
  • Implications of workplace change

39
No shortage of resources
  • Newspapers such as The New York Times, The
    Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The
    Miami Herald, The Chicago Tribute, The Los
    Angeles Times, The Times of London, and USA
    Today.
  • Magazines include Vital Speeches of the Day,
    Time, Newsweek, U. S. News and World Report, The
    Forum for Applied Research and Public Policy,
    Atlantic, The Nation and The Futurist. Also, the
    U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and the
    Department of Labor.

40
Environmental Scan Getting Information to Staff
-- Daily bulletin, popular print
materials. -- Gary Marx Ten Trends Educating
Students for a Profoundly Different Future
-- 21st Century Skills http//www.ncrel.org
/engauge/skills/indepth.htm -- (Futurework)
www.dol.gov/dol/asp/public/futurework/report --
(General Trends) www.kent.wednet.edu/district/st
rat_plan
41
Environmental Scan The Key Question
What are the most important things we can
develop in our students, based upon the kind of
world in which they are likely to live?
42
Mission
43
Mission Statement

A statement that identifies the priorities and
educational beliefs of the school/district with
regard to what is to be developed within its
students.
44
Mission Statement Boiler Plate
1) General philosophical statement.
2) Support of the district mission. 3) Self
imposed duty regarding the preparation of
students. 4) What needs to be developed within
students. Think about the skills you
needed when you graduated from high school.
Contrast those with the skills your current
students will need when they graduate from
high school. What skills will they need?
45
Mission
  • What is YOUR school mission?
  • Good, bad and ugly?
  • Use the rubric to evaluate mission statements.

Table Activity
46
From Eric Hoffer
  • In times of change, learners inherit the earth,
    while the learned find themselves beautifully
    equipped to deal with a world that no longer
    exists.

47
Once the profile is completed and the mission is
written, it is time to write your student
performance goals.
"Bridging from Profile and Mission to Goal
Writing"
48
Student Performance Goals
49
School Improvement Concept Writing Goals
  • Writing appropriate student performance goals is
    one of the most important steps in the
    development of the school improvement plan.

50
Whoever writes the goals owns the goals.
51
Understanding the Goal
Goal Types
Essence of the Goal
Student Performance Goals
Sources
Mission
Rubrics to Evaluate Goals
Profile
A Boiler Plate for Writing Goals
All students will increase ______________________
across the curriculum. clients will
improve across the school
in a variety of contexts.
52
Goal Types
  • Type I Knowledge
  • Type II -- Ability to Apply Knowledge
  • Type III --Habits/Patterns of Behavior
  • Type IV -- Attitudes, Perceptions, Beliefs,
    Opinions, Feelings
  • The Type of Goal Determines the Type of
    Assessment

53
Essence
  • Before an intervention can be established the
    essence of the goal must be determined. Essence
    involves determining the dimensions of a concept
    on which the school wishes to focus.
  • Example What does citizenship mean to your
    faculty?

54
Essence of Citizenship
  • 1. Compliance with the rules
  • 2. Understanding participative governance
  • 3. Service to humanity
  • The focus a school takes can drastically
    affect the interventions and assessments the
    school in the School Improvement Plan.

55
  • Essence of the Goal

What does research say about the relationship
between self esteem and achievement in school?
Global Self Esteem
Sense of Belonging
Self Esteem
Perception of Ability Self efficacy
Self Respect
What does it mean to
have self esteem? comprehend what one reads? be
responsible? think critically? respect
someone? be respectful to someone? be a good
citizen?
56
Questions RE Student Performance Goals
  • How many total goals?
  • How many cognitive and affective goals?
  • How are state and district goals addressed?
  • How long does a school keep a goal?
  • Does a school have non-student performance goals?

57
School Improvement Plan(SIP)
58
SIP Components
Assessments that will be used to document
program improvement Interventions that will
be used to improve student performance Professi
onal Development needed to implement the
interventions Logistical/Action Plan that will
support the implementation of the assessments,
interventions and professional
development.
59
  • Note
  • The School Improvement Plan is comprised of the
    SIP Abstract (the basic design) and the
    Logistical/Action plan (which contains the
    details for implementation.)
  • Available at Illinois website nca.uillinois.edu
  • .

60
Assessments
61
Selecting Assessments
  • Identify Assessments That Will Be Used To Show
    Improvement on Each Goal
  • Match Assessment Type with Goal Type
  • How many assessments?
  • Align assessments with goals and interventions.

62
School Improvement Assessments
  • Locally Developed Assessments
  • Developed and used in specific schools or
    districts
  • Usually classroom-based
  • Standardized Assessments
  • Widely administered
  • Recognized and understood by the public

63
Selecting/Creating Assessments
  • Standardized
  • Advantages Greater possibility of validity and
    reliability
  • Politically more acceptable
    to community
  • Procedures are standardized
  • Disadvantages Cost
  • Less likely to match your educational
    program or curriculum
  • Appropriate common metric to
    measure your goal may
    not exist

64
TYPES OF ASSESSMENTS Used for Assessing Student
performance
Portfolios
Nationally Normed Tests
Surveys/Interviews
Criterion Referenced Tests
CURRICULUM
PARENT SURVEY
TEST
STUDENT SURVEY
STAFF SURVEY
Observational Data Collection
Authentic Assessment
Evaluate performance at a "real world task"
which involves higher order thinking
65
Key Questions Assessments
  • How many assessments are needed for each goal?
  • Are we assessing the goal or the intervention?
  • Must every intervention have an assessment?
  • Must every assessment be given to every student
    every year?

66
Interventions
67
Definition
  • An intervention is something that is done to or
    with students that develops something desired
    within the student. For schools involved in the
    NCA school improvement process the something
    desired should be the goal areas.

68
Interventions address the reasons why students
are not being successful.
  • Cause Effect
  • Symptom versus Cause
  • Thorough Analysis of Data

69
How to Use Data to Create Powerful Interventions
  • Start with Findings (facts).
  • Analyze to explain why the facts are what they
    are
  • intuitive analysis
  • analysis using data
  • research based
  • For each explanation or reason,
    identify/determine the Implications for
    interventions/strategies.

70
Keys for Interventions
  • Use the experience of staff for intuitive
    analysis
  • For every reason - identify an intervention
  • Need to put data in the hands of the teachers
  • Regularly assess and revisit

71
Good Interventions develop the goal area within
the student.
  • They should do one of the following
  • Develop Knowledge
  • Apply Knowledge
  • Develop Patterns of Behavior
  • Develop Attitudes

72
Research Based Interventions
  • Discuss the ways schools could locate
    research-based or best practice interventions.

R
73
ASCD
  • Association for Supervision and
  • Curriculum Development
  • 1703 North Beauregard Street
  • Alexandria, Virginia 22311
  • 1-800-933-2723
  • www.ascd.org
  • Magazine Educational Leadership

74
Education Research Service
  • Will provide research to member schools on any
    topic requested.
  • 2000 Clarendon Road
  • Arlington, VA 22201
  • 703-243-2100
  • ers_at_access.digex.net

75
Northwest Regional Lab
  • www.nwrel.org
  • All regional labs available from this website

76
  • Educational Best Practices
  • www.ed.gov/inits/statelocal/sl-best.html

77
Key Questions Interventions
  • How many interventions needed for each goal?
  • Can some interventions only address subgroups and
    not all students?
  • How do we incorporate teacher stuff if we are
    to write interventions in student terms?
  • Do all teachers have to do all interventions?
  • Can some interventions cross over into other
    goals?

78
Intervention Questions Contd
  • Where do we put parent-related pieces in our
    plan?
  • Must all interventions be research-based?
  • How do we get the faculty to select interventions?

79
Professional Development
80
Professional Development
  • Helps faculty learn about the new interventions
    and how to implement them.
  • Needs to be directly linked to the school
    improvement plan.

81
Questions . . .
  • What is required to move faculty from awareness
    to actual transfer into the classroom?
  • How will you know the plan is being implemented
    in the classroom?

82
One purpose of staff development is to unite the
staffs of schools in studying ways of improving
the school and engagement in continuous programs
to make it better. Schools become outstanding
when school improvement is a prominent part of
the staff development activities. Bruce
Joyce and Beverly Showers
83
School Improvement Plan
  • Evaluate the sample SIP in terms
    of Goals Alignment Potential for
    success
  • Make suggestions to improve

Table Activity
84
Action Plan
85
Action Plans
  • For every intervention in a school improvement
    plan there is created at least one action plan
    page. This page contains all the details that go
    into the plan. The important word here is
    details. Always provide more information than
    you think necessary.

86
LOGISTICAL ACTION PLAN
  • Logistical Details what has to be done to
    implement the interventions
  • Action Who will do what and when
  • Plan . . . of mice and men . . .

87
Action Plan Template
88
2 ADDITIONAL ITEMS TO DO
  • Complete the Capacity Assessment Instrument
  • Collect Baseline Data

89
Capacity Assessment Instrument (CAI)
  • Complete at time of SIP and end of cycle
  • 80 questions elongated rubric of 20 items
  • Reach consensus among the faculty
  • Complete for first team visit
  • Complete for Documentation Visit
  • NCA CASI Website

90
Capacity Assessment Instrument
91
Baseline Data!!!!!!!
  • Pre-test or PRE INTERVENTION
  • Post-test or END OF CYCLE
  • Same assessments
  • Collect for each subgroup

92
Never be afraid to try something new. Remember,
amateurs built the ark and professionals built
the titanic.
93
NCA CASIandIllinois NCA CASIThank You for
Participating
  • We are here to help you with your school
    improvement process.

94
APPENDIX
95
Preparing Students for Contemporary Work and
Society
96
Conventional AcademicSuccess has Involved
  • Mastery of basic skills
  • Largely solitary study
  • Generally uninterrupted work
  • Concentration on a single subject
  • Much written work
  • High analytical ability

97
Workplace Success Involves
  • Mastery of basic skills
  • Working with others
  • Constant distractions
  • Working at different levels across different
    disciplines
  • Mainly verbal skills
  • Problem-solving and decision-making

98
Does it have to be either or?
  • No, it must be both. However workplace skills do
    not always come from academic skills.
  • Academics are neither good at finding novel
    solutions, nor at synthesizing , nor at living
    with ambiguity, nor making difficult decisions.

99
Real Life Skills
  • In a world of continuous change where creativity,
    personal responsibility and innovation are in
    ever greater demand, the ability of individuals
    to plan and implement their own ongoing learning
    without external direction has to be the key to
    success.

100
Here is the problem
  • Society is recognizing the restrictive and
    unimaginative.
  • Now television, video, linked with active
    technologies such as the computer, CD ROM systems
    and the Internet, provide an astonishing array of
    tools for constructive learning.
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