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Boy Scout Troop 477

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SECTION 11. DOUBLE SPRING GAP TO THUNDER ROCK CAMPGROUND. 11.2 miles. Strenuous. ... It includes many steep climbs and descents over several mountain tops. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Boy Scout Troop 477


1
Boy Scout Troop 477
  • 2004 Outdoor Program Planning

2
Ideas for Troop Outings!
Backpacking Trips
3
Backpacking Trips
  • Bartram Trail
  • Benton Mackaye Trail
  • Appalachian Trail
  • Georgia
  • North Carolina
  • Standing Indian
  • Cohutta Wilderness

4
Backpacking Trips
  • Bartram Trail

Bartram Trail is designated a National Recreation
Trail and stretches from the Georgia-North
Carolina border southwest over the summit of
Rabun Bald(Georgia's second highest peak) turns
south-southeast to the Chattooga River and then
heads northeast paralleling the river to the GA
28 bridge. The trail approximates the route of
18th century naturalist and explorer William
Bartram and is part of a much longer trail that
is, in many places, unmarked and poorly
maintained. In North Georgia the portion of
the trail that winds through the Tallulah Ranger
District is well maintained. About 37 miles long,
this trail retraces a portion of the naturalist's
path. Bartram actually traversed a significant
portion of North Georgia from Savannah to
Ellicott Rock. The trail begins at the North
Carolina-Georgia border and passes over Rabun
Bald, the second tallest peak in Georgia.
5
Backpacking Trips
  • Bartram Trail Rabun Bald Section

The trail may be viewed in sections, as most
people do the Appalachian Trail. Just south of
the North Carolina border the Bartram Trail
crosses Hale Ridge Road. It continues generally
southwest from here to just past Raven Knob. The
route rises and falls until the base of Rabun
Bald. Here, about 3 miles into the trail, the
path begins to rise to the bald and is rocky. A
structure at the top provides for great 360
degree views. Experienced hikers can go to Rabun
Bald and return in a day. From the bald the trail
falls, rising to one of the many mountains in
Georgia named Flat Top, and repeats this familiar
pattern. The tops offer good views, particularly
Wilson Knob. After the trail turns south at
Raven's Knob, a number of waterfalls are nearby,
including a fifty foot drop on Martin's Creek and
Becky Branch Falls, near Warwoman Dell. The path
crosses Warwoman Road into the Dell.
6
BARTRAM TRAIL RABUN BALD SECTION
7
BARTRAM TRAIL RABUN BALD SECTION
8
Backpacking Trips
  • Bartram Trail Rabun Bald Section

Trail Section Length Hale Ridge Road to
Warwoman Dell 17.2 miles. Location Rabun
CountyFeatures falls, scenic, stream,
camping.This section includes a forest service
road crossing which can be used to create a
backpacking opportunity for less experienced
backpackers. There is also an alternate northern
trail head cutting off 2 miles.
Directions to Northern Trail Head Take US
441 north from Clayton to Dillard. A mile north
of Dillard, turn right onto Ga 246 towards
Highlands, N.C. Continue on Ga 246 and Ga 106 for
7 miles and turn right on Bald Mountain Road.
Continue for 2.1 miles then take Forest Service
Road 7 (Hale Ridge Road) for 1.1 miles. Southern
trail head access is at Warwoman Dell on Warwoman
Dell Road.
9
BARTRAM TRAIL RABUN BALD SECTION
10
BARTRAM TRAIL RABUN BALD SECTION
11
Bartram Trail Rabun Bald Section
This is Martin Creek Falls located on the Bartram
Trail about 2.5 miles above Warwoman Dell in
Rabun County Georgia. This is one of many
waterfalls which are accessible to hikers in the
area.
12
Backpacking Trips
  • Bartram Trail Rabun Bald Section

13
Backpacking Trips
  • Bartram Trail Chattooga Section

14
Backpacking Trips
  • Bartram Trail Chattooga Section

This section of the Bartram Trail begins at
Worwoman Dell. From Warwoman Rd. to Chattooga
River Trail - 9.0 milesChattooga River Trail to
Warwoman Ford - 3.5 milesWarwoman Ford to
Highway 28 - 6.0 miles From Warwoman Dell, the
path winds in a generally easterly direction.
When it reaches Sandy Ford Road, the trail turns
north along the Chattooga River for about three
miles to its present point of completion on the
south bank of the West Fork of the Chattooga
River. The trail ranges from easy to moderate in
difficulty.
15
Backpacking Trips
16
Backpacking Trips
  • Benton Mackaye Trail

SECTION 1 SPRINGER MOUNTAIN TO THREE FORKS.
5.8 miles. Easy. This section essentially
traverses the pre-1977 corridor of the AT. It is
well constructed and well blazed. Access roads
are FS 42 and FS 58 (Noontootla Creek Road).
17
Backpacking Trips
  • Benton Mackaye Trail

Section 1 Springer Mountain to Three Forks
18
Backpacking Trips
  • Benton Mackaye Trail

SECTION 2 THREE FORKS TO GA 60. 11.4 miles.
Moderate. This section is contiguous in part
with the AT and entirely with the Duncan Ridge
Trail. It is essentially an overnight hike.
Highlights of this section are the dramatic
Forest Service suspension bridge over the Toccoa
River and the newly created wildlife opening
where many animals and plants may be readily
seen. Access roads are FS 58 and GA 60.
19
Backpacking Trips
  • Benton Mackaye Trail

Forest Service suspension bridge over the Toccoa
River.
20
Backpacking Trips
  • Benton Mackaye Trail

SECTION 3 GA 60 TO SKEENAH GAP. 5.7 miles.
Difficult. This section is the most strenuous
part of the BMT. The view from the top, however,
after the character-building climb up the south
face of Wallhalah Mountain, is worth the effort.
Note that at Rhodes Mountain the Duncan Ridge
Trail turns east-northeast, while the Benton
MacKaye Trail regains its own identity and
proceeds westward. Access roads are GA 60 and
Skeenah Gap Road.
21
Backpacking Trips
  • Benton Mackaye Trail

SECTION 4 SKEENAH GAP TO WILSCOT GAP. 5.3
miles. Moderate. An up-and-down hike through
general forest area. This is a very nice day
hike, especially in winter, with views of the
adjacent ridges and pastoral valleys. Access
roads are Skeenah Gap Road and GA 60 at Wilscot
Gap.
22
Backpacking Trips
  • Benton Mackaye Trail

SECTION 5 WILSCOT GAP TO SHALLOWFORD
BRIDGE. 7.1 miles. Moderate. The most difficult
part of this hike is the initial climb up Tipton
Mountain. After this portion, the trail undulates
over Brawley Mountain and Garland Mountain before
descending to the beautiful Toccoa River. The
climbs are challenging, and the beauty of the
forest is rewarding. Access is by GA 60 and
adjacent Forest Service roads, Dial Road and Aska
Road. The number of access points allows for
shorter hikes if desired.
23
Backpacking Trips
  • Benton Mackaye Trail

SECTION 6 SHALLOWFORD BRIDGE TO GA 5. 11.4
miles. Moderate. This section is a good overnight
trek and provides many sites atop Rocky and/or
Davenport mountains or Scroggin Knob to stop,
rest, and enjoy the views. Fall Branch Falls is a
highlight right at the start, and the view from
Scroggin Knob near the end of the hike is also
pleasurable. It is here, climbing Rocky Mountain,
that the BMT begins to follow the western arm of
the Blue Ridge. White square blazes designating
the contiguous Rich Mountain Trail will also be
seen here.
24
Backpacking Trips
  • Benton Mackaye Trail

SECTION 7 GA 5 TO BUSH HEAD GAP. 6.5 miles.
Easy. First part of this section uses an
easement on private property. Hikers will
encounter superb spring wildflowers and a
picturesque creek with picnic table. This section
also contains the only shelter on the BMT. The
remaining 2.5 miles are on Gilmer County roads to
Bush Head Gap.
25
Backpacking Trips
  • Benton Mackaye Trail

SECTION 8 BUSH HEAD GAP TO DYER GAP. 12.6
miles. Moderate. A long day hike or a very
pleasant overnight trip, this part of the BMT is
located entirely along the Tennessee Valley
Divide. This is general forest land and many
activities of the multiuse forest, such as
logging, will be seen here. Road access is by the
Bush Head Gap Road and FS 64 south of Watson Gap
at the northern end.
26
Backpacking Trips
  • Benton Mackaye Trail

SECTION 9 DYER GAP TO WATSON GAP. 4.5 miles.
Easy. A very short segment of the BMT, this
footpath traverses riverside forest timber
management activity areas, and then climbs a
mountain with views of the Cohutta Wilderness
before returning to the trailhead. Road access is
by FS 64 at Dyer Gap and the old GA 2 at Watson
Gap.
27
Backpacking Trips
  • Benton Mackaye Trail

SECTION 10 WATSON GAP TO DOUBLE SPRING GAP. 8.5
miles. Moderate. This section along the high
ridge is located primarily within the Cohutta
Wilderness boundary. It is minimally blazed and
semiprimitive in construction. The BMT is
contiguous with the Hemptop Trail north of Dally
Gap. The blazing changes once again, but the
former Forest Service road provides an easily
followed path. Road access is at Watson Gap.
Double Spring Gap is at the Georgia/Tennessee
state line in the middle of the wilderness. A
trail here leads north.
28
Backpacking Trips
  • Benton Mackaye Trail

SECTION 11. DOUBLE SPRING GAP TO THUNDER ROCK
CAMPGROUND. 11.2 miles. Strenuous. This newly
opened section leads to the Ocoee River in
Tennessee and lies primarily within the Big Frog
Wilderness. Trail ascends Big Frog Mountain, a
very steep climb, then descends on a network of
old trails and Forest Service roads, along with
the new trail, before reaching Thunder Rock
Campground in the Cherokee National Forest and
Ocoee 3 powerhouse on US 64. The 1996 Summer
Olympic venue for whitewater events is just east
on the Ocoee River.
29
Backpacking Trips
30
Appalachian Trail In Georgia
The GATC is a voluntary association of
individuals who, because of their love of our
wilderness areas, have assumed responsibility for
maintenance of the Appalachian Trail in Georgia.
31
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32
Appalachian Trail In Georgia
  • The Trail in Georgia extends some eighty miles
    through the primitive areas of the Chattahoochee
    National Forest. Rising at times to elevations
    over 4400 feet, the Trail offers unlimited hiking
    adventure of exceptional challenge and variety.

33
Appalachian Trail In Georgia
  • The Trail has numerous sections with access by
    paved highway and Forest Service Roads allowing
    planning for a variety of different trips.
  • Hikers might choose to trek North to South, or
    start in the South at Amicalola Falls State Park,
    on the Approach Trail.

34
Appalachian Trail In Georgia
Approach TrailFrom Amicalola Falls State Park,
the blue-blazed Approach Trail begins behind the
visitor center. The trail goes 8.3 miles north to
summit of Springer Mountain. Frosty Mountain is
at mile 4.9 of Approach Trail, and Nimblewill Gap
is at mile 6.1.
35
Appalachian Trail In Georgia
  • Miles 75.4
  • Elevation range2,510 4,461 feet
  • Best time to hike
  • April-May
  • September-October
  • Areas of heavy use
  • Blood Mountain
  • Springer Mountain
  • The entire Georgia portion in March and April

36
Appalachian Trail In Georgia
Springer Mountain This plaque on Springer
Mountain in Georgia's Chattahoochee National
Forest marks the southern terminus of the
Appalachian Trail. Springer Mountain sits at the
southern end of the western Blue Ridge. Most
thru-hikers begin their trek here in the spring
and hike north to Maine.
37
Appalachian Trail In Georgia
Blood Mountain Shelter This stone shelter is
perched on top of the highest peak on the Georgia
section of the A.T.Blood Mountain (4,461 feet).
The mountain's name is said to derive from a
battle between the Creek and Cherokee Indians.
The fighting on the slopes of the mountain was
said to have been so deadly that the mountain ran
red with blood.
38
Appalachian Trail In Georgia
  • South to North Section 1
  • AT Springer Mountain to Woody GapTrail
    Length20.0 miles Location Lumpkin Union Fannin
    CountyFeaturesAT, scenic, falls, camping.Type
    of trailPoint-to-point

39
Appalachian Trail In Georgia
  • South to North Section 2
  • AT Woody Gap to Neels GapTrail Length11.5 miles
    Location Lumpkin Union CountyFeaturesscenic,
    AT, camping.Type of trailPoint-to-point

40
Appalachian Trail In Georgia
  • South to North Section 3
  • AT Neels Gap to Hogpen GapTrail Length6.8 miles
    Location Lumpkin Union CountyFeaturesscenic,
    AT, camping.Type of trailPoint-to-point

41
Appalachian Trail In Georgia
  • South to North Section 4
  • AT Hogpen Gap to Unicoi GapTrail Length13.43
    miles Location Towns White Habersham Rabun
    CountyFeaturesscenic, AT.Type of
    trailPoint-to-point

42
Appalachian Trail In Georgia
  • South to North Section 5
  • AT Unicoi Gap to Dicks Creek GapTrail
    Length12.4 miles Location White Habersham
    Rabun CountyFeaturesscenic, AT.Type of
    trailPoint-to-point

43
Appalachian Trail In Georgia
  • South to North Section 6
  • AT Dicks Creek Gap to Bly GapTrail Length 9.8
    miles Location White Habersham Rabun
    CountyFeaturesscenic, AT.Type of
    trailPoint-to-point

44
Appalachian Trail In Georgia
  • If you've hiked the Georgia section of the A.T.
    you're eligible for a GA Thru-Hiker certificate
    and GA Thru-Hiker patch.
  • Just answer the following questions to see if you
    qualify.
  • 1. Have you hiked the entire 78 miles of the
    Appalachian Trail in Georgia since January 1,
    1986?
  • 2. Would you like to receive a Georgia
    Appalachian Trail Club Thru-Hiker Certificate
    suitable for framing?
  • If you answered "YES" to both questions, then you
    are eligible to receive a certificate at no
    charge.

45
Appalachian Trail In North Carolina
  • Appalachian Trail Hiking in North Carolina Total
    Miles 88.1

46
Appalachian Trail In North Carolina
  • Fontana Dam to Wesser/Nantahala River
  • Section miles 29.4
  • Elevation range
  • 1,7255,062 feet
  • Overview
  • Once known as the most difficult section of the
    entire Trail,
  • relocations have smoothed this section
    considerably, but it still
  • features significant elevation gain and loss.
  • Like much of the Trail in the deep South, you
    have a feeling of
  • remoteness, and a sensation of being in deep
    forests, with
  • stunning displays of wildflowers in spring, and
    rhododendrons,
  • flame azalea, and mountain laurel in bloom in
    early summer.

47
Appalachian Trail In North Carolina
  • Wesser/Nantahala River to N.C./Georgia Border
  • Section miles 58.7
  • Elevation range
  • 1,7255,498 feet
  • Best time to hike
  • Mid-May through October
  • Overview
  • The section from the Nantahala River to the
    Georgia border
  • features the best-graded trail at high elevations
    anywhere in the
  • Deep South, with a couple of short exceptions.
  • There are lots of views from natural openings and
    fire towers,
  • some requiring short side trips.

48
Appalachian Trail In North Carolina
The Wesser/Nantahala River to N.C./Georgia Border
Section of the Trail in North Carolina includes
Standing Indian Mountain. Standing Indian
Mountain from Deep Gap - (5 mi. the Deep Gap par
the Clay County line (small sign) then turn left
onto FS 71, which is(5 mi. moderate, mile gravel-
road ending at Deep Gap. At the gap, the Appalrt)
crosses through the parking area. Go East on the
AT (you pass a wilderness registration booth - if
you don't, you're not on the right trail!). The
trail does a long, gentle climb of the mountain
for 2.5 miles, passing a trail shelter side-trail
on the way. When you reach the blue-blazed Lower
Ridge Trail, turn right - you are near the
summit. Follow this trail to the summit with it's
nice Southwesterly views. Standing Indian is the
highest mountain South of the Smoky Mtns. in this
area (5500 ft.).
49
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50
The Cohutta Wilderness
51
  • Cohutta Wilderness

Hiking Trails of the Cohutta Wilderness With 95
miles of trails, the Cohutta Wilderness is a
hiker's dream come true. After heavy rains, both
the Jacks and Conasauga rivers can become raging
torrents, virtually impossible to cross safely.
Those planning a hike to the Cohutta Wilderness
should watch weather forecasts carefully. Use a
walking stick or staff to help cross rivers, and
if water is raging, do not even try. In bad
weather a trip may get extended. Be prepared for
this possibility with extra food. Make sure
people know the route of the hike and expected
time of return. Even in low water, plan on
getting wet. For example, the Conasauga River
Trail between Betty Gap and FS 17 has 38 river
crossings. Hiking boots will quickly become soggy
foot weights. Many experienced hikers on the
Conasauga and Jacks River Trails wear old tennis
shoes and simply resign themselves to having wet
feet. Bring dry shoes for camp.
52
  • Cohutta Wilderness

Camping is permitted anywhere except in the
trails and at trailheads. The trick is to find a
spot flat enough. Fires are permitted using dead
and down wood only. No permits are required.
Please obey wilderness regulations posted on
bulletin boards at trailheads. Horses are
prohibited on certain trails. These trails are
also posted on bulletin boards. Text mileages
that follow are from Tim Homan's book, The Hiking
Trails of North Georgia. Homan's figures are
regarded as accurate, since he walked and
rewalked the trails using a measuring wheel.
Wilderness maps are available from the U.S.
Forest Service District Office in Chatsworth or
from patrolling Forest Service officers.
53
  • Cohutta Wilderness

CONASAUGA RIVER TRAIL. 13.1 miles. Marked by
yellow blazes, a moderately difficult hiking
trail that fords the river 38 times. Large
Eastern hemlock trees are a feature of this
trail, which is the roadbed of an old railroad.
Bray Field is a popular, but sometimes crowded,
camping area. Directions Southeastern
trailhead at Betty Gap. From the FS 68/FS 64
three-way junction, turn right onto FS 64 and
travel 1.4 miles to the Conasauga River Trail
sign and parking area. Northwestern trailhead.
At 3.2 miles, turn right onto FS 17 at the
Conasauga River Trail sign. Go straight on FS 17
for 3.6 miles and turn left at FS 17-B and
another Conasauga River Trail sign. FS 17-B ends
shortly at the trailhead and parking area.
54
  • Cohutta Wilderness

TEARBRITCHES TRAIL. 3.2 miles. A moderately
difficult to strenuous, orange-blazed trail,
which climbs Bald Mountain (over 4,000 feet
elevation) and then descends steeply to Bray
Fieldthe junction for the Conasauga River and
Hickory Creek trails and nearby Panther Creek
Trail. Directions At the FS 68/FS 64
three-way intersection, turn left toward Lake
Conasauga. Pass Chestnut Lead trailhead.
Trailhead is 3.5 miles from intersection.
55
  • Cohutta Wilderness
  • CHESTNUT LEAD TRAIL. .14 mile. An easy to
    moderately difficult, blue-blazed trail which
    provides a good look at skeletons of giant
    chestnut trees that thrived in this forest before
    the chestnut blight.
  • Directions See Tearbritches Trail, above.
    Trailhead is 2 miles past FS 68/FS 64 three-way
    intersection on FS 68. Parking at trailhead.

56
  • Cohutta Wilderness
  • PANTHER CREEK TRAIL. 3.4 miles. A moderately
    difficult to strenuous, blue-blazed trail, very
    popular and scenic, passing a high waterfall.
    This trail has some very rugged, rocky sections.
  • Directions See East Cowpen Trail for eastern
    end. Trail is 2.3 miles from East Cowpen's
    southern trailhead. See Conasauga River Trail
    above for western end. Trail is 4.9 miles from
    Betty Gap.

57
  • Cohutta Wilderness

HICKORY CREEK TRAIL. 8.6 miles. An easy to
moderately difficult, white-blazed trail, used as
access to the Conasauga River, which can be
reached from either trailhead. From the western
trailhead, the Conasauga is a little more than
1.5 miles. Directions See Crandall Access for
western trailhead. Continue through the FS 630/FS
17 intersection on FS 630. The trailhead is .3
mile. Northern trailhead. After crossing the
Conasauga River, turn right on FS 51. Travel 4.8
miles to the trailheads of Rice Camp and East
Cowpen. Hickory Creek Trail starts about 140
yards along East Cowpen Trail.
58
  • Cohutta Wilderness

EAST COWPEN TRAIL. 7 miles. This moderately
difficult to strenuous trail is a good,
high-elevation trail, which follows the former
route of Old Highway 2, on which erosion control
was done before it was closed. Though not
necessarily a good destination trail, it can
provide relatively quick access to other trails.
Directions See Hickory Creek Trail, northern
trailhead (above), for northern trailhead. See
Ellijay Access for southern trailhead. At the
three-way junction, take FS 64 right for 4.4
miles to the East Cowpen parking lot.
59
  • Cohutta Wilderness

JACKS RIVER TRAIL. 16.7 miles. This moderately
difficult, orange-blazed trail is the roadbed of
an old railroad. It is the longest and wettest
trail in the Cohutta Wilderness, crossing the
river 42 times. It is often crowded at the falls.
The least-used portion of the trail is from
Alaculsy to Jacks River Falls. In the middle of
Horseshoe Bend are several beautiful spots to
camp. Directions See Cisco Access for
northwestern trailhead. See Blue Ridge Access for
southeastern trailhead. At Watson Gap turn right
on FS 22 and travel 3.6 miles to Dally Gap and
Jacks River trailhead.
60
Other Trails In Georgia
61
Other Backpacking Trails
  • ASKA TRAILS Ranger District Toccoa Length 17
    miles Open to Hiking, mountain bicycles These
    trails include Long Branch 2.5-mile loop, Flat
    Creek 5-mile loop, Green Mountain Trail, and
    Stanley Gap Trail. The area is accessed from Aska
    Road parking area at Deep Gap and from Stanley
    Gap and Shady Falls Road. A mixture of single
    track and former logging roads with elevations
    changes of 1,700 feet area encountered. The
    trails offer gentle to moderate hiking grades but
    are challenging for mountain bikes. Directions
    From Blue Ridge, go east 0.25 mile on Old U.S. 76
    to Aska Road. Turn right (south) and continue 4.5
    miles to Deep Gap. The trail crosses the road
    just below gap. To reach Stanley Gap, go on Aska
    Road an additional 3 miles to Stanley Gap Road.
    Turn right on a gravel road and travel 4.2 miles
    to the trailhead. To reach the lakeshore, go 2.5
    miles on the Aska Road and turn left on Campbell
    Camp Road. Travel 2 miles on Forest Service Road
    711 to the trailhead.

62
Other Backpacking Trails
  • MOUNTAINTOWN CREEK TRAIL Ranger District
    Cohutta Length 5.6 miles Open to Hiking and
    mountain bicycles Experience the roaring
    cascades and waterfalls of Mountaintown Creek
    gorge as the trail threads its way through stands
    of white pine and hemlock. Be prepared to get
    your feet wet as the trail crosses the creek
    several times. Sections are rocky and narrow and
    the upper part of the trail is steep. Hills Lake
    on the lower access road is privately owned and
    not open to the general public. Access is from
    the upper trailhead. Directions Take GA 52
    west from Ellijay for 5 miles. Turn right onto
    Gates Chapel Road and go about 4.9 miles to the
    end of the pavement. Turn right onto Forest
    Service Road 90 and go 1.7 miles to the junction
    with Forest Service Road 68. Turn right and go
    3.3 miles to the T-intersection. Turn right onto
    Forest Service Road 64 and go 7.1 miles to the
    upper trailhead.

63
Other Backpacking Trails
  • EMERY CREEK TRAIL Ranger District Cohutta
    Length 6.4 miles Open to Hiking Twin
    waterfalls highlight this trail which follows the
    path of two major mountain streams. From the
    lower trailhead, the trail crosses Holly Creek,
    requiring a difficult ford. It then leads along
    the banks of Emery Creek and ends at the group
    camping area atop Grassy Mountain. An outstanding
    vista of Fort Mountain is available near the
    mountain top. Directions Take U.S. 411 north
    from Chatsworth and go 3 miles to Eton. Turn
    right at the only traffic light and follow the
    road which becomes Forest Service Road 18 for 7.5
    miles to the trailhead parking area.

64
Other Backpacking Trails
  • DUNCAN RIDGE TRAIL Ranger District Brasstown and
    Toccoa Open to Hiking Length 35.5 miles
    This challenging trail follows high, dry ridges
    for most of its length. The trail begins on Long
    Creek near Three Forks on the Appalachian Trail,
    goes north, and crosses the Toccoa River on a
    260-foot swinging bridge. The trail then leads
    north and west along Duncan Ridge through Mulky
    Gap to Slaughter Gap. It includes many steep
    climbs and descents over several mountain tops.
    The trail is blue blazed for all of this section
    but also has yellow blazes on the eastern
    portion, where the Coosa Backcountry Trail shares
    the same treadway and also will have the white
    diamonds of the Benton MacKaye Trail from Long
    Creek Falls for Rhodes Mountain. About 1.25 miles
    on the eastern end are within the Blood Mountain
    Wilderness. A 60 mile loop trail can be made by
    combining this trail with the Appalachian Trail.
    Directions Take U.S. 19 and 129 south from
    Blairsville for 9.5 miles. Turn right (west) onto
    GA 180 and go 3 miles to Wolfpen Gap. The trail
    crosses GA 180 in the gap. The trail can also be
    reached in Mulky Gap by Forest Service Road 4,
    Mulky Gap Road.

65
Other Backpacking TrailsPanther Creek Trail
  • Ranger District Chattooga Length 5.5 miles
    Open to Hiking This trail follows Panther
    Creek through stands of white pine and hemlock
    along steep, rocky bluffs of the creek. The trail
    passes a series of cascades and Panther Creek
    Falls. It terminates where Davidson Creek joins
    Panther Creek. Hikers who carry large packs
    should be cautious of rocky overhangs.
    Directions Take U.S. 441 north from Cornelia
    16 miles. Turn left onto Glen Hardman Road, then
    right onto Old 441 for 1 mile to the parking lot.

66
Other Backpacking TrailsChatooga River Trail
67
Other Backpacking TrailsChatooga River Trail
A past favorite backpacking location of Troop 477
is the Chatooga River Trail. The Chatooga River
Trail is a ruggedly beautiful trail that
traverses one of the wildest river corridors in
the U.S. The trail goes back and forth from
riverbottom to ridgetop many times along the
route. The river starts in the Highlands area of
North Carolina and makes its way south to form
the border between Georgia and South Carolina.
The river is one of the finest whitewater rivers
in America. The Chatooga trail hooks up with both
the Bartram trail and the Foothills trail. There
are many access points and thus many different
hikes that can be done in this area.
68
Other Backpacking TrailsChatooga River Trail
Chatooga River TrailThis moderately difficult
10.7-mile river walk (marked by White Diamond
blazes) meanders along the river, giving you
plenty of places to sit on boulders by the water
in solitude. Hike any time, but it's at its best
in spring and fall. Use Rainy Mountain,
Quadrangle GA-SC, Chatooga Wild and Scenic River
maps. High point is 1,582 ft.
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Other Backpacking TrailsChatooge River Trail
  • Ranger District Tallulah Length 10.7 miles
    Open to Hiking This trail begins at the
    intersection of U.S. 76 and the Chattooga River
    and continues north along the west bank of the
    river. It intersects the Bartram Trail near Sandy
    Ford Road and is often within the boundaries of
    the Chattooga Wild and Scenic River corridor.
    Several spur trails leading to the Chattooga
    River are not maintained. Anticipate numerous
    stream fords. Directions Take U.S. 76 east
    from Clayton for 9 miles. Parking area is on left
    before the Chattooga River bridge.

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Other Backpacking TrailsLadyslipper Trail
  • Ranger District Chattooga Length 6.2 miles
    Open to Hiking and horseback riding This horse
    and foot trail winds up and down hillsides
    through wooded areas. Wildflowers bloom
    abundantly along the trail in the spring and
    summer. You will also find several panoramic
    views along the trail. Directions Take U.S.
    441/GA 365 north from Cornelia to Clarkesville
    exit (GA 197). Turn right on Old 197, at second
    stop sign, turn right onto Dicks Hill Parkway. Go
    0.8 mile and turn left on Forest Service Road 59
    (Lake Russell Road). Turn left to Nancytown Lake
    and follow signs to parking. Trailhead is 0.2
    mile on paved road behind the gate.

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Other Backpacking TrailsSlaughter Creek Trail
  • Ranger District Brasstown Length 2.7 miles
    Open to Hiking Located partly on old roadbeds,
    the trail leads from Lake Winfield Scott
    campground to the Appalachian Trail at Slaughter
    Gap. This moderate blue-blazed trail enters the
    Blood Mountain Wilderness about 1 mile before
    reaching Slaughter Gap. Blazes will be farther
    apart on this section of trail. Directions
    Take U.S. 19 and 129 south from Blairsville for
    9.5 miles. Turn right (west) onto GA 180 and go 7
    miles to the main entrance to Lake Winfield Scott
    camp-ground. Turn left into the campground.
    Follow this road over a hill and continue
    straight ahead into a gravel parking lot at the
    foot of the hill. From the parking lot, hike
    along the paved road passing the guard rail at
    the head of the lake. The trailhead is on the
    right of the road just past the guard rails.

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Other Backpacking TrailsCoosa Backcountry Trail
  • Ranger District Brasstown Length 12.7 miles
    Open to Hiking This yellow-blazed loop trail
    begins in Vogel State Park and returns there
    after many ups and downs, crossing through gaps
    and over mountains. Some ascents are made
    gradually around the slopes and others steeply up
    the ridges. It is somewhat easier if hiked in a
    counterclockwise direction. Approximately one
    fourth of the trail crosses through the Blood
    Mountain Wilderness. Blazes will be farther apart
    on this section. A permit is required for both
    day hiking and backpacking and is available free
    from Vogel State Park Visitor Center.
    Directions Take U.S. 19 and 129 south from
    Blairsville for 10 miles. Turn right into Vogel
    State Park. NOTE There is a parking fee in the
    park. The trail begins to the right of the road
    behind the Park Visitor Center.

73
Other Backpacking TrailsJacks Knob Trail
  • Ranger District Brasstown Length 4.5 miles
    Open to Hiking This blue-blazed trail begins
    with a short climb out of the Brasstown Bald
    parking lot, then descends nearly 1,500 feet
    through a series of switchbacks that cover about
    2 miles. It crosses GA 180 in Jacks Gap and then
    climbs about 2.2 miles to the Appalachian Trail
    at Chattahoochee Gap. Approximately 0.2 mile
    south of Jacks Gap, the trail enters the Mark
    Trail Wilderness. Blazes will be farther apart on
    the wilderness portion of the trail.
    Directions Take U.S. 19 and 129 south from
    Blairsville for 8 miles. Turn left (east) onto GA
    180. After 8 miles, turn left (north) onto GA 180
    Spur and follow it 3 miles to the Brasstown Bald
    Visitor Center parking lot. NOTE There is a
    parking fee. The trail begins at the southern end
    of the parking lot.

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Other Backpacking Trails ARKAQUAH TRAIL
  • Ranger District Brasstown Length 5.5 miles
    Open to Hiking Trail descends along a ridge
    from Brasstown Bald parking lot to Track Rock
    Gap. There are lips and downs, some steep along
    the way. The final mile has several swithbacks.
    Open ridge tops provide excellent views. This
    trail is within the Brasstown Wilderness for
    about 5 miles of its length. This trail is not
    blazed. Directions Take U.S. 19 and 129 south
    from Blairsville for 8 miles. Turn left (east)
    onto Georgia 180. Go 8 miles and turn left
    (north) onto Georgia 180 Spur. Follow this road 3
    miles to the Brasstown Bald Visitor Center
    parking lot. NOTE There is a parking fee. The
    trail leaves the parking lot from the northwest
    corner near the restrooms. To reach the lower end
    of the trail at Track Rock Gap, go east of
    Blairsville on U.S. 76 for 6 miles. Turn right
    (south) on Track Rock Road and drive 3 miles to a
    gravel parking lot on the right just past the
    petroglyphs in the gap. The trail begins across
    the road from the parking lot.

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Backpacking Trips
This concludes the presentation of backpacking
opportunities.
76
Canoeing Trips
  • TOCCOA RIVER CANOE TRAIL Ranger District Toccoa
    Length 17 miles Open to Canoeing The put-in
    point for this canoe trail is at Deep Hole
    Campground and the takeout at the gauging
    station. Caution Do not trespass on adjacent
    private land bordering some sections of the
    river. River is rated Class I and II, with
    currents averaging 3 miles per hour. Expect low
    water levels in midsummer. Directions Take GA
    60 north from Dahlonega for 27 miles or take GA
    60 south from Morganton for 15.5 miles.

77
Mountain Bike Trails
  • TOWN CREEK BIKE TRAIL Ranger District Oconee
    Length 15 miles Open to Motorcycles,
    all-terrain vehicles, and bicycles This double
    loop trail has numerous creek crossings in the
    rolling piedmont of middle Georgia. It starts at
    a hunt camp. We ask that you do not ride when it
    is wet for safety and environmental reasons.
    Directions Take Penfield Road north from
    Greensboro to Shiloh Church. Turn right on a
    dirt, county road and follow until it dead ends.
    Turn left on another dirt, county road and go
    0.75 mile to a hunt camp on the left. Signs mark
    the trail.

78
Boy Scout Troop 477
  • 2004 Outdoor Program Planning
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