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Effective Implementation of SIG Webinar Series Based on the Handbook on Effective Implementation of School Improvement Grants Improving Student Achievement

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Title: Effective Implementation of SIG Webinar Series Based on the Handbook on Effective Implementation of School Improvement Grants Improving Student Achievement


1

Effective Implementation of SIG Webinar
SeriesBased on the Handbook on Effective
Implementation of School Improvement
GrantsImproving Student Achievement Through
the Use of Student Data and Differentiated
Instruction Student Data to Drive Instruction -
Russell Gersten Differentiating Instruction -
Christy Murray
2
The Center on Instruction is operated by RMC
Research Corporation in partnership with the
Florida Center for Reading Research at Florida
State University Instructional Research
Groupthe Texas Institute for Measurement,
Evaluation, and Statistics at the University of
Houston and The Meadows Center for Preventing
Educational Risk at The University of Texas at
Austin. The contents of this PowerPoint were
developed under cooperative agreement S283B050034
withthe U.S. Department of Education. However,
these contents do not necessarilyrepresent the
policy of the Department of Education, and you
should notassume endorsement by the Federal
Government.2010The Center on Instruction
requests that no changes be made to the content
or appearance of this product.To download a
copy of this document, visit www.centeroninstructi
on.org
3
Part 1 Purpose
  • Bring clarification to common areas of confusion
    and inefficiency in the use of student assessment
    data
  • In addition
  • Highlight key points in material in SIG Handbook
  • Mention resources

4
School Action Principle 1Universal screening
  • Screen all students.
  • Screening measures should be brief and/or
    efficient . (Hamilton, Halverson, Jackson,
    Mandinach, Supovitz, Wayman, 2009 Gersten,
    Beckmann, Clarke, Foegen, Marsh, Star, Witzel,
    2009 Gersten, Compton, Connor, Dimino, Santoro,
    Linan-Thompson, Tilly, 2008)

5
School Action Principle 1Universal screening
  • Key Question 1
  • What are the most important technical issues to
    look for in selecting a screening measure?
  • Participation Item 1 - Mark with highlighter the
    two most important issues to consider
  • 1. Concurrent validity with a standardized test
  • 2. Predictive validity of scores on standardized
    test two years later
  • 3. Reliability of parallel forms
  • 4. Reliability across testers

6
School Action Principle 1Universal screening
  • Key Question 2
  • Is it important to ensure that the content of
    the screening measure carefully aligns to
    district and state standards?
  • Participation Item 2 - Mark with highlighter
    whether you think this is
  • 1. Yes or
  • 2. No

7
School Action Principle 1 Universal screening
  • Key Question 3
  • Is it a good idea to use screening measures for
    both diagnostic purposes as well as screening
    purposes?
  • Participation Item 3 Think about this for 30
    seconds.

8
School Action Principle 1 Universal screening
  • Key Question 4
  • I have been told that I have to screen all
    students each fall but it seems a waste of time
    to screen the students who consistently succeed
    in mathematics or reading. Should I keep
    screening them?

9
School Action Principle 1Universal screening
  • Key Question 5
  • Can I use last springs state assessment data as
    a screening measure for 4th to 9th graders?

10
School Action Principle 1 Universal screening
  • Key Question 6
  • How important is it that all students in a
    school are screened within the same two weeks?
  • Participation Item 4 How important is screening
    within 2 weeks?
  • Essential
  • Important
  • Not at all important

11
School Action Principle 2Progress monitoring
  • Use efficient, easy-to-use progress monitoring
    measures to track the growth of students who are
    receiving intervention services towards critical
    academic outcomes.
  • (National Center on Response to
    Intervention, n.d. Hamilton, Halverson, Jackson,
    Mandinach, Supovitz, Wayman, 2009 Gersten,
    Beckmann, Clarke, Foegen, Marsh, Star, Witzel,
    2009 Gersten, Compton, Connor, Dimino, Santoro,
    Linan-Thompson, Tilly, 2008).
  • Make sure to also track the students who score
    slightly above the at-risk category on screening
    measures!

12
School Action Principle 2Progress monitoring
  • Key Question 1
  • What are key features to look for in a progress
    monitoring measure?
  • Participation Item 5 Which of these are key
    features to look for?
  • Covers all key grade level standards or focal
    points
  • Efficiency
  • Sensitivity to change
  • Whether or not it is a timed measure

13
School Action Principle 2Progress monitoring
  • Key Question 2
  • What content should be included in a progress
    monitoring measure?

14
School Action Principle 2Progress monitoring
  • Key Question 3
  • Which students should have their progress in
    mathematics monitored on a regular basis?
  • Participation Item 6 Pick one
  • All
  • Those below benchmark
  • Below benchmark and slightly above benchmark

15
School Action Principle 2 Progress monitoring
  • Key Question 4
  • Is there any research demonstrating that regular
    use of progress monitoring improves students
    proficiency in mathematics and reading?

16
School Action Principle 3Formative assessments
  • Consider use of a range of formative assessments
    and curriculum-embedded assessments to assist in
    progress monitoring. Open-ended formative
    assessments attempt to assess level of student
    understanding using performance assessments.
  • (The National Center for Fair and Open Testing,
    2007).
  • Formative assessments are embedded within the
    learning activity and linked directly to the
    current unit of instruction.
  • (Perle, Marion Gong, 2007 as cited in
    Hamilton, Halverson, Jackson, Mandinach,
    Supovitz, Wayman, 2009, p.47).

17
School Action Principle 3Formative assessments
  • Key Question 1
  • What is the difference between formative
    assessments and progress monitoring measures?

18
School Action Principle 3 Formative assessments
  • Key Question 2
  • Can I use a combination of progress monitoring
    measures and these much more informal assessments?

19
School Action Principle 3Formative assessments
  • Key Question 3
  • Is there much research on formative assessments?

20
School Action Principle 4Identify areas of need
  • Review of data might show that one teachers
    students scored worse than the others did. Wont
    this be humiliating or embarrassing?

21
District Action Principle 1Tracking system
  • Develop a data system or adopt an available data
    system that enables analysis of student
    performance data at the district and school
    level. (Hamilton, Halverson, Jackson, Mandinach,
    Supovitz, Wayman, 2009).

22
District Action Principle 2Identify areas of
need (again)
  • Use annual state testing performance data to
    pinpoint specific areas of strength and weakness
    in student academic performance.
  • (Hamilton, Halverson, Jackson, Mandinach,
    Supovitz, Wayman, 2009)
  • Consider use of documents such as the Needs
    Assessment from Center on InstructionMathematics.
    (Dimino, Taylor, Koontz, Ketterlin-Geller,
    2010)

23
District Action Principle 1Tracking system
  • Key Question
  • Should we cluster items to correspond to state
    standards or Common Core State Standards (when
    relevant)?

24
District Action Principle 3Reliability
validity
  • Determine the reliability and criterion-related
    validity of these measures.
  • (Hamilton, Halverson, Jackson, Mandinach,
    Supovitz, Wayman, 2009 National Center on
    Response to Intervention, n.d.)

25
District Action Principle 3Reliability
validity
  • Key Question 1
  • Should each school do this on its own?
  • Participation Item 7 Think about this question
    for 30 seconds.
  • Key Question 2
  • What is the role of the state department of
    education in this?

26
District Action Principle 4Put data to use
  • These activities should be linked to RtI
    activities that are ongoing in the district.
  • (National Center on Response to Intervention,
    n.d.).
  • They also should include professional development
    on data interpretation and use of data to provide
    differentiated instruction.

27
Other Considerations Special education
  • Use of screening and benchmark data in RTI.
    Consider only students who fail to respond to
    effective interventions for possible special
    education referral for reading or mathematics
    disabilities.
  • Participation Item 8 How important will this be
    in 3 years?
  • Not at all
  • Depends a lot on state regulations and federal
    legislation
  • Not sure
  • Very

28
  • Questions

29
Introduction
  • What is differentiated instruction?
  • Research-based practices used to accommodate
    student differences in the classroom
  • Scaffolding
  • Various grouping practices
  • Modification of assignments
  • Multiple modes of response
  • Other effective instructional strategies

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30
Your TurnWhich are examples of differentiated
instruction?
  • Developing separate lesson plans for every
    student in your class.
  • Pulling two students aside for extra instruction
    on fractions during silent work time.
  • Giving a writing assignment to all your students
    except your most severe LD students these
    students are allowed to draw a picture instead.
  • Allowing students to always choose their groups
    for cooperative assignments.
  • Engaging students in a vocabulary lesson where
    students are asked to generate and record (in
    journals) examples and non-examples of conceptual
    words in their science unit.

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Examples and Non-examples of Differentiated
Instruction
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Overview of School Action Principles
  • Implement ongoing progress monitoring to obtain
    valid student data, and use this data to inform
    instructional decisions and determine appropriate
    grouping patterns (Tomlinson Allan, 2000
    Tomlinson, 2001 Moon, 2005).
  • Use grouping strategies to meet the individual
    needs of students within the broader group
    context and design instructional tasks for each
    group to align with educational goals (Hall,
    2002).
  • Use differentiated instructional strategies to
    include special education students in the general
    education curriculum (Boderick, Mehta-Parekh,
    Reid, 2005) and to respond to the unique needs of
    diverse gifted learners (VanTassel-Baska
    Stambaugh, 2005).

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School Action Principle 1
  • Implement ongoing progress monitoring to obtain
    valid student data, and use this data to inform
    instructional decisions and determine appropriate
    grouping patterns (Tomlinson Allan, 2000
    Tomlinson, 2001 Moon, 2005).

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Progress Monitoring/Data-Based Decision
MakingKey Question 1
  • 1. What data are important to collect to inform
    instructional decisions?
  • Screening measures, progress monitoring,
    curriculum based assessment and measurement,
    observations, weekly classroom quizzes.
  • These data sources alert teachers to which
    students are struggling, are at risk for not
    meeting end of year benchmarks and are in need of
    supplemental instruction so that they may make
    data-based decisions and differentiate
    instruction.

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Progress Monitoring/Data-Based Decision
MakingKey Question 2
  • 2. How can principals and school leadership teams
    support differentiated instruction and data-based
    decision making?
  • Promoting the use of assessments
  • Implementing school-wide data management
  • Providing meaningful professional development
  • Scheduling data meetings
  • Providing leadership for planning and
    implementation of interventions

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Helpful Resources
  • Teaching all students to read in elementary
    school A guide for principals. Center on
    Instruction. http//www.centeroninstruction.org/re
    sources.cfm?categoryreadingsubcategorymaterials
    grade_start0grade_end3148
  • Improving literacy instruction in middle and high
    schools A guide for principals. Center on
    Instruction. http//www.centeroninstruction.org/re
    sources.cfm?categoryreadingsubcategorymaterials
    grade_start6grade_end12121
  • Using student achievement data to support
    instructional decision making (NCEE 2009-4067).
    IES http//ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/publications/practi
    ceguides/

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School Action Principle 2
  • Use grouping strategies to meet the individual
    needs of students within the broader group
    context and design instructional tasks for each
    group to align with educational goals (Hall,
    2002).

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Use Grouping StrategiesKey Question 1
  • 1. What grouping formats support the individual
    needs of students?
  • Differentiated instruction can be delivered in a
    whole-group format, but struggling students need
    to receive differentiated instruction within a
    small-group setting.
  • Research indicates that small group, supplemental
    instruction is most effective for elementary
    students when students are taught in a 13 or 11
    group size.

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Use Grouping StrategiesKey Question 2
  • 2. How can teachers design effective small group
    and student center activities?
  • Make use of student centers
  • Design a management system
  • Explicitly teach academic skills (with modeling,
    guided practice, and supported application) prior
    to students engaging in center work independently

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Helpful Resources
  • Using Student Center Activities to Differentiate
    Reading Instruction A Guide for Teachers
  • http//www.centeroninstruction.org/resources_searc
    hresults.cfm?searchtermsUsingStudentCenterActi
    vitiestoDifferentiateReadingInstruction3AA
    GuideforTeachers
  • Student Center ActivitiesFlorida Center for
    Reading Research (FCRR)
  • http//www.fcrr.org/Curriculum/SCAindex.shtm
  • Various Modules from the IRIS Center
  • RTI (Part 4) Putting it all together
    http//iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/rti04_alltogeth
    er/chalcycle.htm
  • PALS A Reading Strategy for Grades K-1
    http//iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/palsk1/chalcycl
    e.htm
  • PALS A Reading Strategy for Grades 2-6
    http//iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/pals26/chalcycl
    e.htm
  • PALS A Reading Strategy for High School
    http//iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/palshs/chalcycl
    e.htm
  • CSR A Reading Comprehension Strategy
    http//iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/csr/cresource.h
    tm

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School Action Principle 3
  • Use differentiated instructional strategies to
    include special education students in the general
    education curriculum (Boderick, Mehta-Parekh,
    Reid, 2005) and to respond to the unique needs of
    diverse gifted learners (VanTassel-Baska
    Stambaugh, 2005).

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Support Special Education GT StudentsKey
Question 1
  • 1. What are some specific ways to make
    instruction more intense to support special
    education students?
  • Instruction can be made more intense by altering
  • group size
  • instructional delivery
  • instructional time

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Support Special Education GT StudentsKey
Question 2
  • 2. What considerations should be made when
    differentiating instruction for gifted learners?
  • Provide additional time for enrichment
    (curriculum compacting)
  • Extending instruction when students are ready to
    move ahead

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Helpful Resources
  • Instructional Decision-Making Procedures
    Ensuring Appropriate Instruction for Struggling
    Students in Grades K-3
  • http//buildingrti.utexas.org/PDF/Instructional_De
    cision-making_Procedures.pdf

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School Reflection Question
  • What processes and procedures might be helpful at
    the classroom and building level to ensure proper
    and effective use of differentiated instruction?

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Overview of District Action Principles
  • Provide professional development on
    differentiating instruction for classroom
    teachers
  • Utilize coaching methods to support teachers as
    they learn to differentiate instruction in their
    classrooms (Newman Singer, n.d.).

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District Action Principle 1
  • Provide professional development on
    differentiating instruction for classroom
    teachers.

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Provide PD on Differentiating InstructionKey
Question 1
  • 1. What are the most important instructional
    concepts and strategies that need to be taught
    during professional development on
    differentiating instruction?
  • Explicit instruction with modeling
  • Systematic instruction with scaffolding
  • Ample practice opportunities
  • Immediate, corrective feedback
  • Flexible grouping strategies
  • Management of student centers and small groups
  • Ongoing data collection and data-based decision
    making

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Provide PD on Differentiating InstructionKey
Question 2
  • 2. How can I make professional development
    meaningful and effective for school staff?
  • Connecting content to school improvement, student
    learning goals, and curriculum
  • Having PD facilitators model instructional
    strategies and provide examples
  • Implementing intensive, ongoing, and job-embedded
    PD through follow-up time and on-site support.

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Helpful Resources
  • Differentiated Instruction, Part I PD Module
    (Texas)
  • http//www.centeroninstruction.org/resources.cfm?c
    ategoryspecialEdsubcategorymaterialsgrade_star
    t0grade_end12302

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District Action Principle 2
  • Utilize coaching methods to support teachers as
    they learn to differentiate instruction in their
    classrooms (Newman Singer, n.d.).

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Utilize Coaching MethodsKey Question 1
  • 1. Why is ongoing instructional coaching needed
    to support teachers as they learn how to
    differentiate instruction in the classroom?
  • Provides authentic learning opportunities
    (Lieberman, 1995)
  • Allows for reinforcement of skills and strategies
    (Newman Singer, n.d.)
  • Provides teachers with an opportunity to work
    collaboratively to refine their practice
    (Annenberg Institute for School Reform, 2004
    Neufeld Roper, 2003, Poglinco et al., 2003)

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Utilize Coaching Methods Key Question 2
  • 2. How are effective instructional coaches
    identified, selected, and supported?
  • Instructional coaches must be
  • Well-versed in research and best practices
  • Have strong communication skills
  • Demonstrate effective coaching practices
  • Be provided with opportunities for professional
    growth and refinement of coaching skills
  • (Kinkead, 2007)

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Helpful Resources
  • Annenberg Institute for School Reform (AISR).
    (2004). Instructional coaching Professional
    development strategies that improve instruction.
    Retrieved from www.annenberginstitute.org/pdf/Inst
    ructionalCoaching.pdf
  • Kinkead, S. (2007, June). Improving instruction
    through coaching. Silverdale, WA Center for
    Strengthening the Teaching Profession. Retrieved
    from www.plcwashington.org/coaching/resources/CST
    P-coaching-brochure.pdf
  • Neufeld, B., Roper, D. (2003). Coaching A
    Strategy for Developing Instructional Capacity,
    Promises, and Practicalities. Washington, DC
    Aspen Institute Program on Education and
    Providence, RI Annenberg Institute for School
    Reform, 2003. Retrieved from www.annenberginstitut
    e.org/pdf/Coaching.pdf

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District Reflection Question
  • How does the use of differentiated instruction
    align with and support the goals of other federal
    priorities and initiatives like college and
    career readiness, common core standards, and the
    ESEA Blueprint?

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English Language Learners
  • Explicit, systematic instruction
  • Data-based decision making
  • Modeling
  • Scaffolding
  • Ample opportunities to respond
  • Immediate feedback
  • Flexible grouping strategies
  • Targeted support for vocabulary
  • Assessment in both languages

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Resources and Examples
  • Resources and examples to support the key
    questions and action steps are available for
    download as an accompaniment to the PowerPoint on
    the Center on Instructions website.

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58
  • Questions

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