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National hui

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National hui National Aspiring Principals Programme The role of the principal April 2010 Margaret Bendall This session An exploration rather than a revelation! – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: National hui


1
  • National hui
  • National Aspiring Principals Programme
  • The role of the principal
  • April 2010 Margaret Bendall

2
This session
  • An exploration rather than a revelation!
  • The (optimistic) objective to clarify a little
    (a) your own current thinking about the role
    (within some suggested frameworks)(b) how you
    might shape your professional learning in
    readiness for the role
  • Through presentation, group thinking, guided and
    personal reflection

3
Reflection for action your personal Reflection
Sheet (in your own time)
  • Reflection is the process of stepping back from
    an experience, to ponder, carefully and
    persistently, its meaning to the self
    (Daudelin 1996)
  • One workshop is not learning, until you expand
    your PPK through doing something yourself, with
    the information, designing something trying it,
    evaluating it and redesigning on the basis of
    what you have found (John Edwards FTPP 2009)

4
Shared thinking guided thinking
  • Thinking is about using creative, critical and
    metacognitive processes to make sense of
    information, experiences and ideas (to)
    actively seek, use and create knowledge NZC
    Key Competencies
  • Group worksheets for shared thinking on tables
    (A3) maximum of 5 people?
  • Guided thinking framework later

5
The role of the principal what are you thinking
now?
  • In groups of five - each first think about
    principals I have known, and what you have
    learned about the role so far.
  • At speed and briefly, each person then defines
    for the group one aspect of the role of the
    principal, as she or he currently sees it -
    continue in turn until stopped!
  • Record ideas on the groups worksheet (bottom
    section, as indicated)

6
First-time principals what makes the
principals role uniquely challenging?
  • (5 FTP workshops numbers number of groups that
    came to this conclusion)
  • The role is multi-faceted, with many
    responsibilities, and extensive knowledge is
    expected of the principal - many balls in air -
    one drops and others follow there is a need to
    hold things together (x7)

7
Sense-making a need to hold things
together (with thanks to Dr Graeme Aitken)
  • Complexity cognitive overload
  • Eisner(about curriculum development) What
    members of the field of education in general and
    curriculum in particular have increasingly come
    to understand is that given a competition between
    the general and the particular the particular
    will win every time

8
Sense-making (cont)
  • Spillane - teachers(school leaders?) do not
    deliberately resist or misconstrue when faced
    with change, but we all need sense-making,
    interactions between individual cognition, social
    situation and clarity of material
  • So, as leaders of change, do the sense-making,
    make the connections, understand and clarify
    understandings, develop the whole picture

9
The whole picture (Aitken) a need to hold
things together (FTPP)
  • Learning that is purposeful In your groups,
    using the top section of the worksheet,
    co-construct a statement in response to the
    question What is the purpose of an education
    at any New Zealand school?

10
What is the purpose of a school?
  • Successful school leavers
  • Have a positive sense of identity (ies)
  • Take responsibility for themselves and are
    motivated, reliable and confident
  • Are resilient and active seekers, users and
    creators of knowledge
  • Understand and can critique the nature of the
    world around them and make informed decisions
  • Participate effectively in a range of life
    contexts, including family, community, learning
    and work
  • Are equipped to engage in learning throughout
    life
  • Are thoughtful and capable citizens
  • Brewerton, MOE

11
New Zealand Curriculum
  • Our vision - for each young person to be
  • confident (positive in their own identity,
    motivated and reliable, resilient)
  • connected (able to relate well to others, members
    of communities , international citizens)

12
New Zealand Curriculum
  • Our vision - for each young person to be
  • actively involved (participants in a range of
    life contexts, contributors to the well-being of
    New Zealand, cultural, social, economic and
    environmental
  • lifelong learners (literate and numerate,
    critical and creative thinkers, active seekers
    users and creators of knowledge, informed
    decision-makers

13
The purpose of schooling other voices
  • Learning to know, learning to do, learning to
    be, learning to live together - Unesco the four
    pillars of learning for living in the 21st
    century
  • Knowing, learning and doing things with
    knowledge are now more important than knowledge
    itself. Jane Gilbert Catching the
    Knowledge Wave?
  • 2005

14
The purpose of schooling other voices
  • To prepare the nations citizens to positively
    participate in society (Apryll Parata, Deputy
    Secretary FTPP Residential last week)
  • To realise Maori potential, inherent capability
    (Ka Hikitia)
  • To deliver to all students their right to learn
    how to learn especially dispositions for learning
    Professor Guy Claxton (see also NZC principle
  • To ensure the presence, engagement,achievement
    of every student MoE

15
The purpose of schooling other voices
  • Education has an avidly social justice agenda
    redolent with moral purpose and needs to be
    communicated as such (my emphasis)
  • that all young people progressively develop
    the knowledge, understanding, skills, attitudes
    and values in the curriculum and become
    effective, enthusiastic and independent learners
    committed to lifelong learning and able to handle
    the demands of adult life
  • David Hopkins
  • University of Londons Institute of Education

16
Connections and alignment NAPP map! (Guided
thinking)
  • Learning is supported by
  • Connection - making connection to students lives
  • Alignment - aligning experiences to important
    outcomes
  • Community - building and sustaining a learning
    community
  • Interest - designing experiences that interest
    students
  • BES Effective Pedagogy (in the Social Sciences)

17
  • Guided Thinking On your own map (a possible
    starting point for aligning your thinking about
    the role of the principal and related
    professional learning), quickly draft a possible
    purpose for the school you will lead, drawing on
    group thinking and the other voices.

18
The role of the principal professional learning
  • Your workshops and keynotes at this hui
  • Principal Professional Standards NAGS and
    NEGs(National contexts for your work?)
  • Unpacking the BES Coaching for Performance
    Appraisal to improve Student Learning Using Data
    to to improve student learning (Pedagogical
    leadership, being the head teacher?)

19
The role of the principal
  • Workshops Leading Change the practices of
    Bi-cultural Principalship Difficult
    Conversations Self Review Strategic Planning
    Keynotes Building Relational Trust, Leading
    People through Change, Culturally Responsive
    Leadership (Professional tools for building a
    learning culture?)
  • Self Development through Reflection Support for
    principals - personally and through on-line
    resourcing (Developing self as leading learner?)

20
Kiwi Leadership for Principals Educational
Leadership Model
21
Connections and alignment - the need to hold it
all together!
  • In pairs/threes, but using your own map
  • Align recent professional learning in the key
    areas of practice for principals (including
    workshops and keynotes at this and other learning
    events)?NB Just a trial exercise!
  • Use the back of the sheet for any learning you
    found hard to place name any new categories if
    you can
  • Implications? (Any next steps suggested?)

22
The role of the principal the KLP qualities.
  • Manaakitanga leading with moral purpose
  • Ako Being a learner, building collaborative
    learning and teaching relationships in the
    school, maintaining a depth of professional
    knowledge
  • Awhinatanga Guiding and supporting,
    interpersonal care from school leadership evident
    in staff relationships
  • Pono Having the self-belief to lead with
  • integrity and conviction

23
The role of the principal BES Leadership.Knowled
ge, Skills and Dispositions
  • Ensure administrative decisions are informed by
    knowledge about effective pedagogy
  • Analyse and solve complex problems
  • Build relational trust
  • Engage in open-to-learning
  • conversations

24
Principalship through and with others
  • Leadership rather than leaders is what is
    needed. it is unrealistic to expect any one
    leader to possess all the KSDs to a high level.
    What is reasonable is to expect is that all New
    Zealand schools can access these capabilities
    from within or outside their school
  • BES Leadership page 47

25
(No Transcript)
26
The role of the principal NAPP curriculum
  • Understanding the role of the principal
  • In addition to leading learning and leading
    change, the principal has a multi-faceted role
    includingStrategic direction and self-review
    leading in a bi-cultural society managing
    systems and resources understanding the New
    Zealand context (diversity, self management) the
    principal asa member of the Board

27
Strategic thinking
  • Utilising available resources in a plan has the
    desired end firmly in sight and focuses multiple
    components/actions on a shared goal?
  • Your map? The end is your schools purpose, (to
    be detailed further in your school curriculum)
    Viviane Robinson recently strategic
    thinking is making sense of a mess

28
Strategic Thinking
  • All the changes you lead must be consistent with
    your purpose you make sense, for staff, of
    their work in the school
  • Milestone goals, for Annual Planning? but
    purposefulness must always be in sight (Julia
    Atkin, to First-Time Principals - make every
    decision with your vision in mind)
  • Read the BES on Goal Setting
  • Ben Levin - three goals maximum, persistently
    reiterated, monitored,reported on.

29
Strategic thinking/Self -review/inquiry
  • Self-review and inquiry as key leadership smart
    tools
  • ERO definitions of self-review
  • Investigating evidence (data that has been made
    sense of) related to both social and academic
    outcomes for students, to find out where
    improvement may be needed, planning for
    improvement on the basis of the data, setting
    goals and targets, gathering data to evaluate
    shifts/further needs.
  • ECE definition Self review is the deliberate
    and on-going process of finding out how well our
    practice enhances childrens learning and
    development what we do well and what we can do
    better, so that our practice is transformed in
    ways that benefit our children.

30
Managing systems and resources
  • BES Knowledge, Skills, Dispositions Ensure
    administrative decisions are informed by
    knowledge about effective pedagogy
  • BES dimension Resourcing Strategically
  • Educational Leadership
  • ... is leadership that causes others to do
    things that can be expected to improve outcomes
    for students systems in this context?
  • BES School Leadership page 70

31
The NZ context self-management
  • Self-management enables schools to design local
    responses to local needs see NZC
  • But as school leaders our moral responsibility is
    also to the nations children, the network of
    schools - Ben Levin and others note that this
    is both a moral and and an economic imperative
    (The Spirit Level)
  • Beware spending energy on what is good for the
    school, not the students one risk of Tomorrows
    Schools?

32
The NZ context self-management
  • National imperatives, currently the NZC and Ka
    Hikitia (defining the social and academic
    outcomes we value as a country), transcend
    self-management
  • The NZC and Ka Hikitia as our primary guides
    BES School Leadership p72
  • In The New Zealand Curriculum, the desired
    outcomes include selected values, key
    competencies and achievement objectives in eight
    learning areas. In Ka Hikitia, Maori achieving
    success as Maori is the overarching strategic
    outcome (BES page 72-3)

33
Leading in a bi-cultural society
  • Responsive and accountable professional
    leadership
  • Leaders know, practice and widely advocate what
    works best for and with Maori students
  • Leaders develop collaborative relationships with
    whanau, hapu and iwi to share expertise and work
    together to achieve shared outcomes Ka Hikitia
    p28Develop your own knowledge, be willing to ask

34
The New Zealand context diversity
  • Registered Teacher Criteria - every 3 years
  • Teachers (enable) the educational achievement of
    all akonga/learners
  • Have a particular responsibility in Aotearoa
    New Zealand to promote equitable learning
    outcomes (especially Treaty of Waitangi)
  • In an increasingly multi-cultural Aotearoa New
    Zealand need to be aware of and respect the
    languages heritages and cultures of all akonga

35
The New Zealand context diversity
  • NZC Requirements for Board of Trustees
  • through the principal and staff, develop and
    implement a curriculum Years 1-13 that is
  • underpinned by and consistent with the
    principles
  • in which the values are encouraged and modelled
    and explored by students
  • that supports students to develop the
    competencies

36
The school curriculum must be consistent with
principles
  • Treaty of Waitangi
  • A curriculum that acknowledges the principles
    of the Treaty of Waitangi and the bicultural
    foundations of Aotearoa New Zealand p.9
  • Cultural Diversity
  • A curriculum that reflects New Zealands
    cultural diversity and values the histories and
    traditions of all its people

37
NZC Values to be encouraged and modelled and
explored by students
  • Students encouraged to value
  • Diversity, as found in our different cultures,
    languages and heritages
  • Equity, through fairness and social justice
  • and to respect themselves, others and human
    rights

38
The New Zealand context Diversity
  • The goal is positively harnessing Pasifika
    diversity and their multiple world views within
    an enabling education system that works for young
    people, their families and communities Pasifika
    success is critical for the future of Aotearoa
    New Zealand.
  • Pasifika Education Plan

39
The principal as a Board Member
  • The Education Act 1989 (s.75) states that the
    board of trustees "has complete discretion to
    control the management of the school as it thinks
    fit."
  • S.76 states that the principal "has complete
    discretion to manage the day-to-day
    administration within the general policy
    direction of the board."

40
Working with the Board partnership?
relationships?
  • Notwithstanding my recognition that strictly
    speaking under the regime of Tomorrows Schools
    the Principal is legally responsible for the day
    to day management of a state secondary school and
    accountable to the Board of Trustees in its
    ultimate, pervasive governance role, the
    fundamental essence of Tomorrows Schools is the
    maintenance of a very high and comprehensive
    level of trust level of co-operation, respect,
    goodwill and trust between a Board of Trustees
    (and) its Chief Executive for the day to day
    management of a state secondary school and
    accountable to the Board of Trustees in its
    ultimate, pervasive governance role, the
    fundamental essence of Tomorrows Schools is the
    maintenance of a my recognition that strictly
    speaking under the regime of Tomorrows Schools
    the Principal is legally responsible for the day
    to day management of a state secondary school and
    accountable to the Board of Trustees in its
    ultimate, pervasive governance role, the
    fundamental essence of Tomorrows Schools is the
    maintenance of a very high and comprehensive
    level of trust level of co-operation, respect,
    goodwill and trust between a Board of Trustees
    (and) its Chief Executive .igh and comprehensive
    level of trust level of co-operation, respect,
    goodwill and trust between a Board of Trustees
    (and) its Chief Executive . notwithstanding my
    recognition that strictly speaking under the
    regime of Tomorrows Schools the Principal is
    legally responsible for the day to day management
    of a state secondary school and accountable to
    the Board of Trustees in its ultimate, pervasive
    governance role, the fundamental essence of
    Tomorrows Schools is the maintenance of a very
    high and comprehensive level of trust level of
    co-operation, respect, goodwill and trust between
    a Board of Trustees (and) its Chief Executive .

41
Working with the Board
  • Clearly a doctrinaire mutual exclusivity
    approach to the issues of day to day management
    and governance, if rigidly adhered to and
    persisted in by either a Principal or a Board of
    Trustees, will tend to create confrontation
    between them which is the antithesis of the
    cooperative, trusting partnership approach
    contemplated in Tomorrows Schools regime.
  • Judge Palmer, Hobday vs Timaru Girls High
    School (1994)

42
Moving into the role of the principal
  • What do you think your greatest challenge will
    be as you make the shift from senior leader to
    the role of principal?

43
What makes the role of principal uniquely
challenging?
  • (5 FTP workshops numbers number of groups
    whose considerations resulted in the statement)
  • The buck stops here (x9) We experience
    isolation/loneliness (x3)

44
What makes the role of principal uniquely
challenging?
  • And no-one in a school wants to know it is
    often hard for their leaders!
  • Nelson Mandela, about leadership accept pain
    but do not inflict it.
  • Effective leaders in schools demonstrate
    unwarranted optimism, have endless wells of
    intellectual curiosity and a complete absence of
    paranoia or self pity David Woods Chief
    Adviser School Effectiveness, Unit UK Dept
    Education and Skills

45
The role of the principal
  • Active leadership One role that appears
    crucial for gaining and maintaining teachers
    interest in on-going learning is developing
    a realistic vision ... of better student
    outcomes, more meaningful curriculum content, or
    different pedagogical approaches ... in which
    new things are possible
  • Helen Timperley et al
  • Teacher Professional Learning and Development BES
  • (International Academy of Education publication)

46
The role of the principal A new theology of
leadership
John McBeath School of Education, University of
Cambridge
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