1. Australian society is an individualistic society and Australians tend to control the situation and to achieve their goals by themselves. The Power is quite horizontally distributed.   2. Australian society today is multi-cultural and multi-faith. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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1. Australian society is an individualistic society and Australians tend to control the situation and to achieve their goals by themselves. The Power is quite horizontally distributed.   2. Australian society today is multi-cultural and multi-faith.

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Title: 1. Australian society is an individualistic society and Australians tend to control the situation and to achieve their goals by themselves. The Power is quite horizontally distributed.   2. Australian society today is multi-cultural and multi-faith.


1
1. Australian society is an individualistic
society and Australians tend to control the
situation and to achieve their goals by
themselves. The Power is quite horizontally
distributed. 2. Australian society today is
multi-cultural and multi-faith. Aussies generally
respect others opinions. 3. Australian society
is mainly a male society and even women tend to
be assertive and competitive as men (a common
myth is for example the bushranger).
AUSTRALIAN CULTURAL VALUES
2
4. Australians value modesty, humility and
sincerity. They dont draw attention to their
academic achievements, to their status or
position or to their success in general. They
distrust people who do. 5. Australians give
high value to social relationships. They also
commonly exchange small gifts between friends and
between trades people too. They offer their help
to their friends, for example when invited to a
barbecue (a habit in Australia). 
3
6. Australians are direct and assertive in the
way they communicate. They like brevity. They
often use colorful language. 7. Australians
like punctuality and dont like waiting. 8.
Australian are informal and casual in greetings
and clothing. 9. Australians generally respect
nature and are aware of environmental issues.
Nature has also an important role in Australian
everyday life.
4
Links
See the most important links http//en.wikipedia
.org/wiki/Australia http//www.kwintessential.co.u
k/resources/global-etiquette/australia.html http/
/www.geert-hofstede.com/hofstede_australia.shtml h
ttp//fits.depauw.edu/mkfinney/culturaleresumes/au
stralia/WorldView.htm http//www.youtube.com/
(videos with Cate Blanchett, Megan Gale, common
people, ect.). Read and listen to the folk song
of Australia Waltzing Matilda
http//www.youtube.com/watch?v6dVZo5a4_Ok
http//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waltzing_matilda.
Read and listen to the national anthem of
Australia Advance Australia Fair
http//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advance_Australia_Fai
rLyrics (the current version). See the film
Australia, 2008 by Baz Luhrmann, with Nicole
Kidman e Hugh Jackman.
5
Australian English
Part A phonemic level
  • General Australian pronunciation
  • the usage of /a?/ (the "long a") as opposed to
    /æ/ ("short a") of the RP pronunciation in words
    like graph, chance, France, dance,
    demand, castle, grasp, bath, palm,
    start, bard, hard and contrast
  • Other pronunciation differences
  • Australia pronounced ?'st?æ?lj? instead of
    aus.'tra.lja
  • - G-day where day is pronounced dai instead of
    dei as in the other words containing the word
    day
  • - I pronounced a instead of ai
  • Good pronounced g?d instead of g?d.
  • General Australian is also characterized by a
    rising intonation at the end of sentences.

6
Part B morphemic level
  • Most common different spelling
  • 'program' more common than programme and gaol
    instead of jail
  • Australians also use youse as the plural form
    of the pronoun you adding the suffix se as in
    American English 'how are youse?'.

7
Part C lexemic level
  • Suffixation with ie/-y or o
  • Australian(s) that became Aussie(s), then cossie
    for costume, barbie for barbeque, arvo for
    afternoon, journo for journalist, muso for
    musician, servo for service station, brekky
    for breakfast, bickie or bikky for biscuit
    and so on.

8
  • Vocabulary
  • words which are strictly connected with the
    Australian history and landscape
  • Bush or scrub any wooded area or from a social
    and/or political perspective it refers to any
    populated region outside of the major
    metropolitan areas
  • Bushranger a criminal outlaw who had the
    survival skills necessary to use the Australian
    bush as a refuge to hide from the authorities in
    the early years of the British settlement of
    Australia
  • mate a friend a companion
  • paddock a field in British English
  • dinky-di 'true', genuine or devoted in
    expressions like 'dinky-di Aussie' that means
    true Australian

9
- Other useful wordsGday good day, a
stereotypical Australian greeting (it can be used
also at night time)footpath pavement in
British Englishweekender holiday
cottagesheila girl or womanlolly
sweetshanty pubbroke for in need offed
with tired of.
10
- Vocabulary influenced by Australian aboriginal
languagesdingo wolflike yellowish-brown wild
dog of Australiacooee as a high-pitched call
for attracting attentionyakka Hard yakka means
hard workdidgeridoo a well-known aboriginal
wooden musical instrumentdreamtime in the
mythology of most Indigenous Australians, a
"golden age" when the first ancestors and living
things were created.outback a sparsely
populated area, far from townsThere are also
many other many other words which are used
differently in Australian English. See
http//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_English_vo
cabulary andhttp//en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendi
xAustralian_English_vocabulary for more
explanation.
11
Part D syntactic level
  • Different usage of used to
  • - negative form in AusE usednt to against
    didnt used to
  • - interrogative form in AusE used she to do it?
    against did she used to do it?
  • Different usage of prepositions which introduce
    the object of comparison
  • - to/from/than
  • AusE Cricket is different to baseball.
  • BrECricket is different from baseball.
  • AmECricket is different than baseball.
  • Different concord with sport team names and
    uncountable nouns
  • Aussies use the singular with these nouns which
    are usually considered plural nouns in BrE
  • - Ex North Melbourne is playing well.

12
Part E textual level
The use of as if as an exclamatory rejection
- "As if they're real tears! - "The case was
dismissed? As if."
13
Part F (normative) pragmatic level
  • When Aussies meet they use g'day which means
    good day, hello and it the typical Aussie
    greeting. When they leave they say hooroo that
    means goodbye. When they thank, they just say
    ta (thank you, derived from infant speech).
    Australian use Im good to say Im fine.
  • They also use expressions like carn (which is an
    assimilation of "come on!" or "Go on!") to invite
    someone. Australians use expression like Let's
    go take a gander or Take a squiz at to say
    to take a look.

14
- Aussies use also a lot of different way to
express surprise and approval as for
exampleCrikey! (exclamation of surprise)hooly
dooley (exclamation of surprise used when
something out of the ordinary happens similar
"good heavens", "my goodness", "good grief",
etc.)beauty! (exclamation showing approval
which is roughly equivalent to Great!,
Fantastic! or Wonderful!) It was the cat's
pyjamas/cat's whiskers!(which means something
great or perfectly suited)she's apples/ she'll
be apples! (that means everything is all right)
she'll be right (that means it will be okay,
it'll turn out all right).
15
- Australians use idiomatic expression as for
exampleto give it a burl that means to try
something to have a goto feel crook that
means to feel sickkangaroos loose in the top
paddock thats used to refer to someone
considered intellectually inadequate.- Colorful
language is very common and is used also to talk
about common things as for examplepiece of
piss used to refer to an easy task pig's arse
to say I don't agree with youitpissing down
that means its raining heavyshits used in
several expressions including shits me (or more
strongly shits me to tears) and gives me the
shits all meaning a combination of annoys me
and makes me angry - When speaking
Australian often have false starts as III
mean. They also use stock phrases as you
know, yeah, uhm and so on.
16
Links http//www.youtube.com/watch?vKpBYnL5fAXE
featurePlayListp0A3E1F13FA145720index1playne
xt2playnext_fromPL http//www.youtube.com/watch
?v0EYLMmRCXbsfeaturePlayListp0A3E1F13FA145720
index0playnext1 http//www.youtube.com/watch?v
7Rl4rEaAZLMfeaturePlayListpA3926C628DC1C2DEp
laynext1playnext_fromPLindex14 http//www.you
tube.com/watch?vdgYJChshynoNR1 http//www.abc.n
et.au/ra/australia/now/default.htm http//www.lyco
s.com/info/australian-english--general-australian-
english.html http//www.doctorconnect.gov.au/inter
net/otd/publishing.nsf/Content/work-AustralianEng
lish http//reese.linguist.de/English/australia.ht
m http//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_English
http//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_English_ph
onology http//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_En
glish_vocabulary http//en.wiktionary.org/wiki/App
endixAustralian_English_vocabulary http//www.can
berratimes.com.au/ http//blacktown.yourguide.com.
au/ http//www.theage.com.au/
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