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Investing in our Children Protecting our Investment

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Jeff Knaggs. Chris Lee. Leisa Mayette. Fred Meinberg. Janet Norling. Andy Phythian ... Remove lockers from 'Keller West'; add 'locker pod' (Keller only) ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Investing in our Children Protecting our Investment


1
Investing in our Children-- Protecting our
Investment
2
  • QA
  • How did the District decide what needed to be
    done?
  • Strategic Planning
  • Two-year facilities study
  • Assessment by architects and construction manager
  • Intensive study by Facilities Committee Board
    of Education
  • Did the public have much input into the process?
  • Strategic Planning
  • Facilities Committee
  • Selection of architect and construction manager
  • 5 community input sessions

3
Facilities Committee 2001-02
School District Representatives
Community Members
Karen Ball Jan Benson Libby Benton Bill
Briggs Bill Carney Steve Gelenger Dan
Haire Michael Hartman John Janssen
Fred Kline Jeff Knaggs Chris Lee Leisa
Mayette Fred Meinberg Janet Norling Andy
Phythian Tracey Robinson Bob Sterk Rita Weaver
George Guzzio Andy Linell Tom Neville Francis
Renou John Schwartz Eileen Steadman Karen
Vecchi Rita Walker Bill White Rick Wood Tom
Hickey Steve Smith
4
Bond Proposal
  • Total Cost of all Projects 99.4 million
  • Average Yearly Cost to Taxpayer 2.64 mils
  • For 140,000 home 185/year .50/day
  • For Purposes of
  • Constructing, furnishing and equipping four new
    elementary school buildings
  • Remodeling, equipping, furnishing, reequipping
    and refurnishing existing School District
    buildings
  • Constructing, furnishing and equipping additions
    to existing School District buildings
  • Acquiring and installing technology in and
    connecting School District buildings
  • Acquiring school buses and
  • Improving and developing sites, including
    playgrounds, playfields, and outdoor athletic
    facilities and structures, in the School
    District
  • May not be used for Salaries or Other Operational
    Expenses

5
  • New Elementary School Projects
  • Grant, Northwood, Parker, Whittier
  • 54,000-square-foot elementary school buildings
    (Grant, Northwood, Whittier), with adjoining
    19,000 square foot early elementary wing at Grant
    (450 students each)
  • 49,000-square-foot elementary school building
    with adjoining 19,000-square-foot early
    elementary wing (Parker) (350 students)
  • Existing building demolition
  • Site work -
  • Earthwork Paving Fencing
  • Utilities Lighting Playground, playfield

6
  • Elementary School Renovation Projects
  • Oak Ridge, Twain, Upton
  • Site work
  • Paving Sidewalks Lighting
  • Screen walls Playground equipment
  • Fencing Landscaping
  • Exterior
  • New roof Fascias Gutters, down spouts
  • Copings Entrance doors Landscaping
  • Selected windows and associated masonry
  • Interior
  • Replace corridor doors Carpet
  • Terrazzo/ceramic tile and vinyl tile

7
  • Elementary School Renovation Projects
  • Oak Ridge, Twain, Upton (continued)
  • Life safety and barrier free improvements
  • Replacement of kitchen equipment
  • Mechanical
  • Boiler Fans
  • Plumbing, piping and fixtures Pumps
  • Air conditioning installation
  • Electrical
  • Power upgrade Power data raceways/outlets
  • Emergency lighting PA system
  • Fire alarm system Selected lighting

8
  • Elementary School Renovation Projects
  • Oak Ridge, Twain, Upton (continued)
  • Four classroom addition with associated site work
    (Upton only)
  • Multi-purpose rooms (Twain and Upton only)
  • Science labs
  • Total Cost of Elementary/Early Childhood
    Projects 54.3 million

9
  • Middle School Renovation Projects
  • Addams and Keller (including Lockman wing)
  • Cafeteria addition
  • Site work
  • Paving Storm water detention and screen wall
  • Exterior
  • New roof Soffits
  • Copings Exterior doors
  • Threshold, sill and window replacement, and
    associated masonry
  • Interior
  • Replacement of corridor doors Ceilings
  • Carpet, terrazzo/ceramic and vinyl tile

10
  • Middle School Renovation Projects
  • Addams and Keller (including Lockman wing)
    (continued)
  • Life safety and barrier free improvements
  • Replacement equipment kitchen equipment,
    tackboard/chalkboard (Addams only)
  • Mechanical
  • Replace boilers Fans
  • Water service and plumbing piping Water heater
  • Air conditioning installation
  • Electrical
  • Power upgrade Power panels
  • Power data raceways/outlets PA system
  • Replace emergency lighting Fire alarm system

11
  • Middle School Renovation Projects
  • Addams and Keller (including Lockman wing)
    (continued)
  • Replace selected lockers, toilet accessories and
    equipment (Keller only)
  • Remove lockers from Keller West add locker
    pod (Keller only)
  • Total Cost of Middle School Projects
    14.7 million

12
  • High School Renovation Projects
  • Dondero and Kimball
  • Site work
  • Paving Fencing
  • Lighting Concrete walks/pads and benches
  • Concession stands/restrooms/running water
  • Exterior
  • New roof Down spouts Soffits
  • Copings Fascias Canopies, sills
  • Exterior doors Greenhouse (Dondero)
  • Selective window replacement and associated
    masonry
  • Selected bleacher replacement (Kimball)

13
  • High School Renovation Projects
  • Dondero and Kimball (continued)
  • Interior
  • Replace carpet Walls
  • Terrazzo/ceramic and vinyl tile Casework
  • Ceiling Selective auditorium remodeling
  • Life safety and barrier free improvements
  • Replace selected kitchen equipment, lockers,
    toilet equipment

14
  • High School Renovation Projects
  • Dondero and Kimball (continued)
  • Mechanical
  • Replace pneumatic controls Boilers and piping
  • Pumps Water service
  • Fans Fans
  • Plumbing fixtures Water heater
  • Pool dehumidification (Kimball) Air
    conditioning installation
  • Remediate water infiltration (Dondero)
  • Electrical
  • Power upgrade PA system
  • Power data raceways/outlets Fire alarm
    system
  • Replace emergency lighting
  • Total Cost of High School Projects 25.2 million

15
  • Other Projects and Total Cost
  • Churchill 3,800,000
  • Maintenance/Transportation Center Renovations
    388,437
  • Asbestos Abatement 1,000,000
  • Cost of Total Project 99,440,989
  • Cost to Taxpayer 2.64 mils

16
  • Technology Infrastructure
  • Install Fiber Optic WAN (Wide Area Network)
  • Replace phone systems
  • Replace building and district file servers
  • Replace obsolete TV monitors
  • Upgrade/replace LAN wiring
  • Upgrade/replace WAN LAN electronics
  • Install video conferencing, broadcasting, and
    video-on-demand capabilities
  • Technology Budget 2.2 million (from investment
    interest)

17
  • Why this Elementary Plan?
  • Central location of schools south of 12 Mile
  • Replaces oldest (80 year old) buildings with
    smallest classrooms
  • Maintains use of the newest elementary schools
  • Conforms to public input sessions
  • A/C
  • Multipurpose rooms
  • Science labs

18
  • Why this Elementary Plan? (continued)
  • Responds to community concerns
  • Schools south of 11 Mile Road
  • Schools west of Woodward
  • Uses existing buildings with largest classrooms
  • Begins addressing long-term vision Best meets
    both present and future instructional needs

19
  • QA
  • How do elementary renovation costs compare with
    building new?
  • Elementary school renovation, A/C, multipurpose
    rooms, science labs, comparable size and numbers
    of classrooms 42,731,923
  • Elementary schools new and renovated 49,827,548
    (without early childhood wings)
  • How much of 1990 Bond Issue would be unused?
  • By completion of all projects, only 2.2 of
    investment will remain in buildings unused as
    schools.

20
  • QA
  • What instructional advantages will there be?
  • Larger classrooms to accommodate cooperative
    learning groups, centers for reading, math, and
    technology
  • Space in classrooms to accommodate support staff
    working with small groups of children
  • Space for storage because there are many more
    materials used in instruction than in the past
  • Science lab room for hands-on-science instruction
  • New wiring for efficient, effective technology

21
  • QA
  • What instructional advantages will there be?
  • Reading Recovery space
  • Larger, dedicated Art and Performing Arts rooms
  • Additional multipurpose room for performances,
    rehearsals, assemblies, open gym during lunch
    (inclement weather), etc.
  • Improved cooling and heating. With the school
    year getting longer and summer school required by
    the State, air conditioning is very important for
    learning. Students are used to air conditioning
    and dont learn as much when it is very warm.
    Also--more organized summer centers
  • Summer Childcare
  • K-12 Summer School
  • Summer Camps (Boys and Girls Club, YMCA_

22
  • QA
  • What instructional advantages will there be?
  • Wider choice of teachers
  • Increased choices of schools organization
  • Larger pool of friends for each child

23
  • Why this Middle School and High School Plan?
  • Addresses most serious infrastructure needs
  • Addresses small cafeterias at Keller and Addams
  • Removes lockers and replaces with locker pods to
    widen hallways
  • Allows reassessment of middle and high schools in
    2012, when current 3.6 debt mils drop off, and
    current enrollments will be known

24
  • Why spend money on Churchill?
  • Many students educated there (400 students per
    day)
  • Opportunity Center
  • Operation Graduation
  • Adult ESL
  • Continuing Education
  • Board Offices move there, thus saving money by
    closing current Board Office

25
  • Why Early Childhood Wings?
  • Designed specifically for small children
  • More accessible to families in all parts of
    district
  • Saves money by closing Lincoln
  • Specific appointments - height of drinking
    fountains and toilets, lavatories in classrooms,
    gross motor room
  • Allows better integration of pre-school and
    elementary instructional programs

26
How do we compare with surrounding districts?
Existing Debt Retirement Millage Rate
Recently Voter Approved or Proposed
Total Debt Millage Rate
District
Year
Levy
Ferndale Hazel Park Clawson Madison Royal Oak
Proposed Oak Park Berkley Royal Oak
Existing Lamphere
2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002 2002
7.000 3.000 6.989 6.600 3.600 5.300 4.370 3.600 3.
400
4.00 2.640
7.000 7.000 6.989 6.600 6.240 5.300 4.370 3.600 3
.400
Proposed millage rate with successful bond issue
election is projected to be 6.25 mills.
27
What will this cost me?
28
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31
  • Construction Schedule
  • June 2002 - May 2003
  • Design new building
  • Create bid specifications
  • May 2003 - July 2004
  • Build Grant
  • Build Northwood
  • Renovate Oak Ridge, Twain, Upton
  • Begin middle school and high school renovations
  • Renovate Churchill and Maintenance/Transportation
    Center

32
  • Construction Schedule
  • June 2004 - May 2005
  • Rebuild Whittier
  • Whittier students move to Longfellow or Oakland
    for one year
  • Longfellow students south of 11 Mile join Oakland
    and Franklin south of 11 Mile at Grant
  • Rebuild Parker
  • Starr students begin at new schools
  • Parker students attend Starr for one year
  • Complete middle school renovation
  • Continue high school renovation

33
  • Construction Schedule
  • June 2005 - May 2006
  • Complete high school renovation
  • New Parker opens
  • New Whittier opens

34
  • QA
  • What happens to school consolidation plan?
  • Rescinded if election is successful.
  • What happens if election is unsuccessful?
  • School consolidation plan will be implemented
    Fall 2003
  • School building renovation costs go unaddressed
  • Major infrastructure failures (boilers, roofs,
    HVAC) require expenditures that will threaten the
    instructional budget
  • 21st Century instruction must fit into early
    20th Century buildings When do we begin
    planning for our childrens futures?

35
  • QA
  • Will this affect property values?
  • Many realtors believe that new schools will draw
    families to live in Royal Oak
  • New schools for the new millenium may help
    houses sell faster
  • Why build new schools instead of renovating?
  • Classrooms are too small in oldest schools to
    meet the needs of current and future instruction
  • To remedy that problem, plus complete needed
    repairs, A/C, multipurpose rooms, science lab -
    cost nearly equals new
  • Over time oldest schools would still need further
    renovations

36
  • Home Loan Cost vs. Bond Issue Cost
  • Loan Term 25 years, 9 months
  • Interest Rate Assumption
  • Bond Issue 5.5
  • Home Mortgage 7.0
  • Amounts Borrowed Assumption
  • Bond Issue 99,400,000
  • Home 140,000
  • Comparative Results
  • Interest as a percent of amount borrowed
  • Bond Issue 95.2
  • Home 116
  • Total Cost--Interest and Principal
  • Bond Issue 194,000,000
  • Home 302,400

37
QA
Will we need all of these schools in the
future?
  • School Current 2006-07 Students/Building 2011-12 S
    tudents/Building
  • Elementary
  • S of 12 Mile 848 596 298 516 258
  • Elementary
  • N of 12 Mile 1740 1751 350 1701 340
  • Elementary
  • Total 2588 2347 335 2217 317
  • Middle School
  • Total 1455 1280 640 1159 580
  • High School
  • Total 2216 2233 1117 1946 973

38
Q A
  • Why not end Schools of Choice, close more
    schools, and reduce the cost of the bond issue?
  • Non-resident students help fund our instructional
    program. The cost savings realized by closing
    schools cannot keep up with the revenue decrease
    caused by declining enrollment.
  • An elementary example
  • Close 1 more school about 300 non-resident
    students who cannot attend here
  • 300 students 2,225,000
  • School closing savings 304,000
  • Teacher reductions (300 students /
  • 25 students per class 12 teachers _at_
  • 50,000 per teacher) 600,000
  • Deficit Remaining 1,321,000
  • The revenue from non-resident students allows us
    to maintain a superior educational program for
    all Royal Oak students.

39
Q A
  • How has Schools of Choice revenue helped Royal
    Oak kids?
  • Elementary class sizes decreased (six (6)
    students below contractual limits)
  • Expanded elementary foreign language program
  • Guided reading books to support elementary
    reading
  • instruction
  • Added
  • High school graphic arts program
  • High school technology classes (ITA, Cisco)
  • Maintained all elements of our instructional
    services and programs
  • Nearly 30 of choice students are former Royal
    Oak residents whose families moved to a
    neighboring community, but chose to keep the
    children in school here!

40
INITIAL RESEARCH--HOW ARE NON-RESIDENT STUDENTS
DOING?
  • Discipline (as percent of total enrollment)
  • Elementary (Parker)
  • fewer non-resident students referred, and fewer
    are repeat offenders
  • High School and Middle School
  • fewer non-resident students referred, and fewer
    repeat offenders
  • however, of repeat offenders, a greater
    percentage are non-residents
  • Academic Performance
  • Middle School
  • Non-resident students GPA is .12 lower than
    residents
  • High School
  • Non-resident students GPA is .19 lower than
    residents

41
  • Vote June 10, 2002
  • 700 a.m. - 800 p.m.
  • Invest in our Children--Protect our Investment

Revised 4/29/02
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