CCCC Game Programming and Design CertificateOur Experience thus Far - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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CCCC Game Programming and Design CertificateOur Experience thus Far

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... board and card games (playtesters solicited! ... Specialized card game (CCG, TCG) Specialized miniatures games (HeroClix) ... card games. Usually ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: CCCC Game Programming and Design CertificateOur Experience thus Far


1
CCCC Game Programming and Design CertificateOur
Experience thus Far
  • Dr. Lewis Pulsipher
  • Certificate devised by Bob Joyce and Mike Orsega
  • Web site for this talk PulsipherGames.com/teachin
    g1.htm

2
My Goals Today
  • Our experiences with our game classes so far
  • What we did in our first game class
  • How our certificate is organized
  • Discuss the diversity of the industrymuch more
    than video games
  • I am not going to talk about game programming per
    se -- nor about game engines etc.

3
Who am I
  • Began playing commercial wargames in 1963
  • Played the original Atari 2600 and have played
    some PC games heavily, but rarely play any video
    games these days never owned a game console
  • Designer of five commercially-published board
    wargames next one forthcoming this August
    (Britannia Second Edition)
  • Active designer of board and card games
    (playtesters solicited!)
  • My main job is teaching networking, Internet Tech

4
Courses in the Certificate
  • CSC 192 Intro to Gaming (Topics class) Fall
  • CSC 293 Game-based Programming (3 SCH) Spring
  • Students now programming original games in
    DarkBasic
  • GRA 151 Graphics in Gaming (2 credit hours)
    Spring
  • Students programming games in Flash
  • CSC 285 Programming Project Summer
  • CIS 115 (Intro to Prog) CSC 134 C
    Programming
  • MontE Christman, the game programming instructor,
    is talking about Flash programming on Friday

5
Intro to Gaming
  • Two contact and credit hours would be better
    with three or four contact hours
  • Two textbooks, one about game design, one about
    getting into the industry
  • Andrew Rollings and Ernest Adams on Game Design.
    New Riders 1st edition (May 2003) 
  • Break Into The Game Industry How to Get A Job
    Making Video Games by Ernest Adams. McGraw-Hill
    2003.
  • Students individually required to create
    preliminary design for a video game and write a
    game treatment for it
  • Students in groups required to design a prototype
    of a non-video game (board, card, etc.)
  • No programming required in this class

6
Intro to Gaming--Goals
  • Make students aware that
  • you cannot just take some classes and walk into a
    game industry job
  • most people making a living from games do not
    work on Big-Time off-the-shelf video games
  • programming is a small part of video game
    production
  • owing to supply and demand, game programming/
    production is not a way to make much money
  • enthusiasm is required, but is just a start

7
Intro to Gaming--Atmosphere
  • Essentially a literacy class, should be fun
  • Provide real-world examples whenever possible
  • Negotiation
  • Experience of designing published games
  • We did not play or look at video games
  • No time
  • Students already familiar with many games

8
Gaming Community
  • Game and Computer Club
  • Play video games on the big projector
  • Playtest non-video games
  • No required participation
  • As with all clubs at non-residential colleges,
    requires a high critical mass of number of
    studentsat present even CCCC isnt large enough

9
Marketing
  • First time around
  • Flyers in local game shop
  • College Web site
  • Night section offered, no signups
  • 10 people in day version, almost all of them were
    already students (or graduates) of our
    department
  • Next time
  • Department Web site (computers.cccc.edu)
  • Much recruiting in high school classes

10
Results
  • The programming-oriented students have continued
    to the next two classes
  • One of the boardgames produced was quite good,
    being played many times by the group
  • The computer game ideas tended to be quite
    derivative (sounded like lots of existing games),
    but thats the nature of the entire video-game
    industry, little risk-taking

11
Video Games
  • Many types, for example
  • Big-time video games (both console and PC)
  • Sold in Best Buy, Babbages, Staples, and the
    like
  • Very visible but only a part of the industry
  • Console and PC games are quite different
  • Cont forget handhelds
  • Online games
  • Not the massively multiplayer games, the other
    online games
  • Some for a charge, some for advertising
  • Small games on other devicescell phones, PDAs,
    etc.

12
Big-time Video Games
  • Console games are very different from PC games
  • I used to say computer games now I say video
    games
  • Console games are simpler, less intellectual
  • consoles are underpowered
  • consoles market to teens/ Gen Y
  • consoles lack keyboards
  • the buyers dont want intellectual games
  • Attitudes toward PC games from console gamers
  • Would rather play on a console!
  • Console game sales of same game are much larger
    (say from 3-1 to 10-1 ratio)

13
Non-computer Games
  • Family boardgames
  • Board wargames
  • Traditional miniatures battles
  • Role-playing games (DD etc.)
  • Specialized card game (CCG, TCG)
  • Specialized miniatures games (HeroClix)
  • Euro-style boardgames

14
Family boardgames
  • Have a bad reputation among adults as most
    involve a lot of luck
  • Still sell much more than other kinds of
    boardgames
  • Examples
  • Monopoly
  • Game of Life
  • Pachesi

15
Board wargames
  • Conflict oriented strategic games, often
    historically based
  • 15,000 individual attendees each year at
    Origins convention (31st annual in Columbus OH,
    June 30-July 3, 2005) (includes non-video games
    of all kinds)
  • Tends to be the domain of middle-aged gamers
    these days
  • Examples
  • Axis Allies
  • Risk
  • Diplomacy
  • Britannia

16
Traditional miniatures battles
  • Tactical table-top battle games
  • Mostly land-based
  • One inch miniatures most popular, but there are
    other scales
  • Painting and collecting often as important as
    playing

17
Role-playing Games
  • Original commercial success was DD, 1973-4
  • Dungeons and Dragons Third Edition hardcover book
    sales in the millions for the past five years
  • Many DD related novels also published
  • Most major movie/book properties have an
    associated role-playing game
  • 50,000 person-days attendance at GenCon,
    Indianapolis, IN (next one August 05)

18
Specialized card games
  • Usually collectible cards
  • Short game play, lots of tournaments, rules
    change over time
  • These are the biggest moneymakers in the USA
    after big-time video games
  • Examples
  • Magic The Gathering
  • Poke-mon, Yu-Gi-Oh
  • Games for most major book/movie properties such
    as Lord of the Rings

19
Specialized miniatures
  • Many are pre-painted, collectibles with a game
    attached
  • Examples
  • Heroclix
  • Heroscape
  • WarHammer and related baroque Games Workshop
    games are a separate high-revenue hobby
  • have their own retail store
  • attractive to teenagers

20
Euro-style boardgames
  • Especially popular in Germany, where families
    play boardgames together every week
  • Can sell over a million copies, comparable to
    most PC games
  • Family games on steroids
  • Much more strategy, but still enough chance for
    the kids
  • Often somewhat abstract
  • A dislike of dice is very noticeable
  • Emphasis on appearance and tactile satisfaction
  • Examples
  • Settlers of Catan
  • Ticket to Ride

21
Some Observations
  • The current generation (Y or millenialup to
    25 or 26 years old) really is different from
    earlier generations
  • It is hard for many of them to understand that
    they need to work at finding a place in the
    industryit wont just happen even if they are
    skilled programmers
  • Many tend to rely on trial and error, which is
    how theyve learned to play video games
  • They are disinclined to read, preferring to see
    or hear (via computer, usually)
  • Prenskys Digital Immigrants idea
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